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John316
March 3rd, 2011, 04:36 PM
How do you all feel about parents side coaching kids (10 to 18 years old)?

Is there any time in which you feel side coaching is justified?

I'd love to hear from those of you who are parents of swimmers and admit to have done this before. Where do you draw the line? Do you keep it hidden from your kids coach? Do you agree that most of the best youth swimmers have been side coached to some extent?

Interesting question.:cheerleader:

KevinS
March 3rd, 2011, 05:53 PM
As a coach, I can see the good and bad of it. If a parent is really experienced and knows what he/she is talking about, how can it be bad - we have all benefitted from advice from a variety of coaches. However, I am also a strong believer in quality practices make for a quality swimmer - so if the quality of a practice a parent may be providing is lacking then there could be problems. It is much easier to learn and practice good habits, than to unlearn bad habits that have developed.

I guess as a parent, it all depends on the level of the swimmer. If they are a beginner or a just for fun club swimmer, I don't see how more time in the water could ever be a problem. However if they are a strong USA swimmer AAA/AAAA times and maybe on the verge of some national level cuts, I would say it is best left up a professional coach that is has been training them. But my twins turn 2 next month. Ask me in 10 years and see what kind of response I give.

stillwater
March 3rd, 2011, 07:10 PM
I have never heard the term "side coaching".

If it means giving support and a tip (if asked), I'm all for it. My problem is my kids rarely ask.


If it means being like the knucklehead dad walking up and down the deck during practice, giving poor stroke and training tips, I'm good with it. But, the parent must wear really big shoes, a bright red ball nose, and a shocking pink wig.

jaadams1
March 3rd, 2011, 07:33 PM
I used to coach with a club team in Oregon a few years back, and we discouraged this "side coaching" by the parents. You want to try to maintain the attention of the swimmer with you, the coach, rather than the swimmer always going back to the mom/dad for advice. They need to get directive from one main source, rather than multiple conflicting sources, though both sources may have the same intent. We had "talks" with those over-eager parents that were in a way - overstepping the boundaries, and it seemed to work. We told them to give all the praise they wanted to, for the good and the bad. Encouragement is great, just be proud that your swimmer did their best, and let them know it...let the coach be the "bad guy". :) :2cents:

no200fly
March 3rd, 2011, 07:40 PM
My daughter has the best answer for this - she wouldn't listen to me if I did have advice.

gobears
March 3rd, 2011, 08:13 PM
Do you agree that most of the best youth swimmers have been side coached to some extent?


No. In my experience as both swimmer and coach, I have found that the parents who actually know a lot about swimming or were athletes themselves tend to let coaches do the coaching. And, if they have suggestions, they approach the coach at an appropriate time instead of walking the pool deck with the coach.

It's the athletically frustrated and less knowledgable parent I usually see attempting to "side-coach." Trying to coach your kid during another coach's practice is not only disruptive but rude. How would you like someone "side-coaching" in a business meeting you were running?

gigi
March 3rd, 2011, 08:24 PM
I can't speak to this exact question, but I suspect it's similar to what I call "multiple editor syndrome" in the college essay process. Young achiever writes a college essay and gives it to a trusted adult (teacher, parent, counsellor, sibling, father's college room-mate who works @ the New Yorker, uncle's former boss who works in admissions at Prestigious U), and gets some advice and makes some changes. Young Achiever (or his/her parent) decides that if some advice is good, more is better, and then picks another person from the list above. YA continues this process until all of the above have been consulted. YA then checks in with 9th, 10th, and 11th grade teachers just to be sure.

THe end result is a kid with a nervous breakdown and an essay that's a mish-mash of good intentions and bad juju. I don't imagine that multiple coach syndrome is much different. Too many cooks CAN spoil the broth.

couldbebetterfly
March 3rd, 2011, 10:00 PM
My daughter has the best answer for this - she wouldn't listen to me if I did have advice.

I suggested to my daughter that when she does a 50 free or 50 back in practice she should do flip turns. She was taught flip turns over the last year, but as a separate exercise.

Her response: My coach didn't tell me to.

:frustrated: Guess my advice isn't wanted either

stillwater
March 3rd, 2011, 10:28 PM
The only thing my daughters will admit to is that I taught them to pull on the lane lines in backstroke. While they are correct, they have taken it to a new level.

Bobinator
March 3rd, 2011, 11:14 PM
As a parent of kids in sports I felt my job was to:
1) Make sure they get plenty of sleep.
2) Feed them wholesome and nutritious foods.
3) Encourage and support their efforts in practice as well as in meets.
4) Support the decisions and opinions of their coaches
5) Only give my opinion when it was asked of me. (not very often)
6) Oh, pay the fees, buy the equipment, provide transportation around the clock!!

The child should feel ownership and control of their sport. I've seen too many parents get over-involved and embarrass the child, make a fool of themselves, and ultimately turn their child off to competitive sports totally.

orca1946
March 4th, 2011, 12:21 AM
Why are you paying a coach to teach your kid & then distract them by telling them to do things while in the session???
Save that for when you are in the pool with them.

John316
March 4th, 2011, 12:33 AM
All of these are great answers though I think many of you may have misunderstood or it is my fault for not making the question more clear. What I meant by "side coaching" would be someone who gives instruction outside of normal practices perhaps at another location and without the youths coach having any knowlage about it.

Rykno
March 4th, 2011, 01:49 AM
we have closed practices. Parents and grandparents can site in a designated area off deck and see their kids, but they are not allowed down on deck during practice.

it's the same rule for our swim school. parents can be in the pool area, but not near the groups, because we feel that it's distracting to both the coaches and the kids if one kid tries to talk to his/her parents, or if the parents try to correct their kid.

in order to make parents happy or feel more involved we have two open practices between sept-dec and then again jan-jun. july-aug is either championship season or rest either way it's closed practice those two months.

ande
March 4th, 2011, 09:45 AM
How do you all feel about parents side coaching kids (10 to 18 years old)?
It depends, does the parent know what they're talking about?
Is the parent working with or defying the coach?
What's the parent's communication style with the child?
Usually it's best for parents to get their swimmers where they need to be, with what they need to have, watch and cheer for their kids at meets, then compliment, encourage and support their children so they feel good about the experience and want to do it again. In most sports it's probably best for parents to NOT watch their children train.
The KEY things to avoid are being: overbearing, more into swimming than your child, and too hard on your kid.

I like to encourage talented age group, college and masters swimmers.
Let them know that I believe in them and they can swim faster faster.
Sometimes I offer suggestions for them to consider.

Employees and athletes tend to perform better when they know someone's paying attention to them.
Love your child, encourage them, believe in them, comfort them, support them.
Have a good relationship with them. Partner with their coaches.

The point of swimming is to have fun, be healthy, be too busy to get in trouble, and develop skills to use to be successful in other areas of life.

Is there any time in which you feel side coaching is justified?
It all depends, but usually it's best to let the coach coach.

Where do you draw the line?
Parents in the stands, coaches on deck.

Do you keep it hidden from your kids coach?
probably

Do you agree that most of the best youth swimmers have been side coached to some extent?
Maybe, but it really depends on the situation. Does the coach know their stuff or did they get lucky and wind up with a really talented swimmer in ther program.



How do you all feel about parents side coaching kids (10 to 18 years old)?
Is there any time in which you feel side coaching is justified?
Where do you draw the line?
Do you keep it hidden from your kids coach?
Do you agree that most of the best youth swimmers have been side coached to some extent?

ande
March 4th, 2011, 10:01 AM
this was interesting and useful

THE SPORT OF SWIMMING

The sport of swimming has many benefits, including the people the parent and child will meet. The camaraderie among swimmers is unique; many swimming buddies become life-long friends. In addition to being around fine people, swimming provides one of the most beneficial forms of exercise for cardiovascular and overall fitness. This exercise can be enjoyed throughout one's entire life. For example, we have had swimmers in their nineties setting "masters" world records.

Possibly the greatest benefits of participating in an organized swim program are the life skills your child will develop. These skills include time management, self discipline and sportsmanship. Your child will reap the benefits of swimming long after his/her participation ends. Most swimmers go on to be very successful and productive adults largely due to what they gained from swimming.

Age group swimming can be fun, exciting and rewarding. Many children improve rapidly and it is not unusual to see big time drops during this phase. Children are learning and growing at a greater rate than any other time in their careers. It is difficult to avoid the tendency to push young athletes at his stage. Although a child of eleven or twelve can handle the physical demands of serious water training, most coaches feel that the workload should not be great until a child reaches puberty. The emphasis should be placed on improving stroke technique. It is strongly recommended that these young athletes participate in other sports during this period. Participating in other sporting activities provides children with a variety and can help prevent "burnout". Many swimmers train for more than ten years during their careers. Swimming, especially at the youngest levels, should be fun and relatively pressure free.

After a child reaches puberty, scientists and coaches feel serious training can begin. This can be a particularly frustrating time for swimmers. During this transition from age group swimming to senior swimming an athlete may experience a plateau or what appears to be a "setback". Chunks of time are no longer being dropped, and the training requires more time and dedication. Many parents begin to question whether a child's swimming career is over at this point. This, coupled with the normal demands of teenage life, causes many swimmers to leave the sport prematurely. It is critical that parents and coaches be very supportive during this period of adjustment, realizing that it will pass. Future performance improvements generally follow.

The above is designed to help you help your child succeed in swimming. Remember, not every swimmer becomes a world record holder, but everyone gains from their swimming experience. Supporting your child in swimming can be one of the most rewarding experiences of your life. You will soon find yourself cheering at competitions, timing during the meets (the best place to see the meet) or even going on to become a US Swimming certified official. Whatever your role, your child's experience in swimming has much to do with your positive support. Please ask questions of your coaches, officials and fellow parents, we all have the same goal; to provide the children with the best possible experience in swimming.


The Parents' Role

Competitive swimming allows the swimmer to experience success and to learn how to deal with defeat, while becoming healthy and physically fit. As a parent, your major responsibility is to provide a stable, loving and supportive environment. This positive environment will encourage your child to continue. Show your interest by ensuring your child's attendance at practices and coming to the meets.

Parents are not participants on their child's team but contribute to the success experienced by the child and his/her team. Parents serve as role models and their attitudes are often emulated by their children. Be aware of this and strive to be positive role models by showing good sportsmanship at all times towards coaches, officials, opponents and teammates.

Be enthusiastic and supportive - Remember that your child is the swimmer. Children need to establish their own goals and make their own progress towards them. Be careful not to impose your own standards and goals.

Do not over burden your child with winning or achieving best times. The most important part of your child's swimming experience is that he/she learn about him/herself while enjoying the sport. This healthy environment encourages learning and fun which will develop a positive self-image within your child.

Let the Coach, coach - The best way to help a child achieve his/her goals and reduce the natural fear of failure is through positive reinforcement. No one likes to make a mistake. If your child does make one, remember that he/she is still learning. Encourage his/her efforts and point the things he/she did well. As long as he/she gave their best effort, you should make him/her feel like a winner.

from http://www.aggieswimclub.org/General%20Info/SportofSwimming.htm

WHAT TO EXPECT AT A MEET -
A Guide for Parents and Swimmers

Get to the swim meet approximately 15-20 minutes before the beginning of the assigned warm-up time. The Ags’ warm-up times will be listed on our website three days prior to the meet. Be ready to get in the pool promptly—warm up is short and usually crowded.

Find the CLERK of COURSE and CIRCLE IN all of your swimmer’s events. Bring a pen or pencil to the meet. (If your swimmer is not circled in for an event, he/she will be scratched and will be unable to swim that event).

Swimmers from the team sit together in a team area near the pool. (Depending upon the meet location, sometimes swimmers and parents can sit together). Parents sit together in the stands. (No parents are usually allowed on the pool deck). It is advisable to bring a couple of lawn chairs or an old blanket to sit on. Some pools have easy access to outdoor areas and may also have bleachers.
Parents should purchase a heat sheet ($5-$10) in order to follow what event is being swum. The heat sheets usually have a calculated time for all the swimming events.

Warm up times and lanes are assigned prior to the meet and are listed in the heat sheet. The swimmers should warm-up with their swim coach. If the coach is not available, a swimmer may (with permission) warm-up with another team and its coaches.
Approximately thirty minutes prior to an event being swum, lane and heat assignments are posted. Swimmers MUST go look at this information!!

Swimmers are responsible for getting themselves up to the event and heat. New swimmers may sometimes be assisted to the area behind their swim block by their swim coach. There is NO READY BENCH in USA Swimming!!
Current events and heat numbers may not be announced over the loud speaker…...parents and swimmers must pay attention!! If a swimmer circles-in for his/her event but does not report to swim the event or misses the event there is a $5.00 fine imposed by Gulf Swimming at the end of each season (May and July) for each no-show event.

After the swimmer finishes his/her event, he/she should always go talk with his/her coach. Results are posted after each event that has been swum.

SWIM FAST AND HAVE FUN!!


from Aggie Swim Club (http://www.aggieswimclub.org/Meet%20Info/ExpectAtAMeet.htm)

John316
March 4th, 2011, 10:49 AM
How about situations where coaches have an "investment" on the team such as coaching their own sons or daughters? I find that many of those particular kids spend quite a bit of time being taught "on the side" by the parent. I also find that most parents don't know squat about the technical side of swimming and will only do more harm than good but there are also those who have good insight to the sport and might be able to give their kid that "extra attention" that perhaps the coach can't give due to a large volume of kids. I dunno, I think it can go both ways but to assume that simply because you are labled a "swim parent" and you must not know anything about the sport or that you cannot offer anything positive to your kid is kind of premature. I've been to too many swim meets and know too many swimmers (and I'm talking AAA,AA here) who obviously have been side coached by someone other than the head coach. On the other hand I've also witnessed too many beserk parents who are watching at EVERY practice, sending their kids to meets that the team isn't even going to and making them practice more than they should or need. I Personally think parents can offer alot to a kid if they know what they are doing but most don't and they don't have a clue that they are harming their kids.

aquageek
March 4th, 2011, 11:10 AM
Worrying about someone else's kid is a waste of time.

stillwater
March 4th, 2011, 11:12 AM
What I meant by "side coaching" would be someone who gives instruction outside of normal practices perhaps at another location and without the youths coach having any knowlage about it.

Sure. If my kids are in to it and the person knows what they are doing. It can't be at practice and a different pool is prefered.

Some coaches don't spend enough time on stroke, extra help on stroke is a good thing.

pwolf66
March 4th, 2011, 12:13 PM
How about situations where coaches have an "investment" on the team such as coaching their own sons or daughters? I find that many of those particular kids spend quite a bit of time being taught "on the side" by the parent. I also find that most parents don't know squat about the technical side of swimming and will only do more harm than good but there are also those who have good insight to the sport and might be able to give their kid that "extra attention" that perhaps the coach can't give due to a large volume of kids. I dunno, I think it can go both ways but to assume that simply because you are labled a "swim parent" and you must not know anything about the sport or that you cannot offer anything positive to your kid is kind of premature. I've been to too many swim meets and know too many swimmers (and I'm talking AAA,AA here) who obviously have been side coached by someone other than the head coach. On the other hand I've also witnessed too many beserk parents who are watching at EVERY practice, sending their kids to meets that the team isn't even going to and making them practice more than they should or need. I Personally think parents can offer alot to a kid if they know what they are doing but most don't and they don't have a clue that they are harming their kids.


I'm a past and current (sorta) swimmer, I'm a swim parent and I'm a swim coach. I started coaching with the program where my daughter swims three years ago basically because I was riding the fine line of becoming one of 'those' parents, at least while on deck. The head coach took me aside and said 'you want to coach? Then let's give it a shot', I've been a developmental coach ever since.

The number one hardest thing, in my opinion, is to be an accomplished swimmer and to have your child(ren) also be swimmers. You WANT to help them but you absolutely must not. You HAVE to let them have this sport for themselves, if you don't then you risk spoiling it for them.

In my case as my daughter got a little older, we talked about the Coach/Parent dynamic and we promised each other to respect the role each of us has to play in the relationship. If I'm coaching her practice, I'm the coach, she's the swimmer but once practice is over, that relationship is done, we only talk about swimming (rarely) when she initiates the topic. Other than those times, it's a parent/child dynamic. We each slip up (her more than me lately as she tries to work both sides during practice) but we call each other on it and strive to maintain the boundaries.

Another point is that you as a parent are part of a TRIANGLE consisting of Parent (you), Swimmer (your child) and Coach. If you have concerns or questions, email the coach. If there is something you are seeing in your child's swimming, do NOT speak with the swimmer, speak with the coach away from the pool deck. That is what we encourage are parents to do and in a lot of cases has really helped to reduce the parental stress on the swimmer.

And we pay to have our child(ren) swim with these programs. We send our child(ren) there for a reason (sometimes just to get them out of the house <g>). If there is a perceived lack of instruction, then contact the head coach. And if someone thinks they have the skills, knowledge and ability to coach, try and find out if you can be a volunteer assistant coach just to see if it's something that you can do and enjoy.

Remember, the coach is the third most visible authority firgure in your child's life behind parents and teachers. My daughter spends about 10 hours/week with her swim coaches.

John316
March 4th, 2011, 01:15 PM
Worrying about someone else's kid is a waste of time.

Unfortunately in the sport of swimming it's a given that you have to worry about someone elses kid since it is they your kid has to compete against. You'd be surprised at how many kids take an active interest in their times, who they are competing against and so forth. There's the fun "aspect" of being on a team and there's also the "competitive" aspect which unfortunately most parents take to the extreme.

Chris Stevenson
March 4th, 2011, 01:33 PM
Unfortunately in the sport of swimming it's a given that you have to worry about someone elses kid since it is they your kid has to compete against.

I disagree. You or your child cannot control how others swim. It is great to use competition as a spur to advance, but ultimately the clock is the best measure of improvement. It never lies.

Paul had a great post. My short version: I think parent "side coaching" is never a good idea, unless the parent is a paid coach on the swim team.

Redbird Alum
March 4th, 2011, 01:59 PM
I believe the revised scenario says the coaching is happening separately, without the primary coaches' knowledge.

So, if I'm the primary coach:
1. Can I stop it? - NO, I DON'T KNOW ABOUT IT
2. Can I care about it? - NOT IF I DON'T KNOW ABOUT IT

That leaves the situation where somehow, I find out about it...

When I am actively coaching swimmers, I care about their skills, performance, and well-being within my sphere of influence (the practices and meets where I am present as coach). If the swimmer, or their parent, chooses to seek advice elsewhere, I can not control it.

If they choose to ignore my advice in practice, I can ask them to explain how what they want to do enhances their ability, I can ask that they move aside and allow others to do what I am asking, but I can not physically force them to do what I want.

aquageek
March 4th, 2011, 03:47 PM
Unfortunately in the sport of swimming it's a given that you have to worry about someone elses kid since it is they your kid has to compete against. You'd be surprised at how many kids take an active interest in their times, who they are competing against and so forth. There's the fun "aspect" of being on a team and there's also the "competitive" aspect which unfortunately most parents take to the extreme.

Thanks for the lesson. I disagree with you. I never worry about anyone else's child, just root them along. And, it is untrue that "most" parents take it to the extreme. Most parents don't take it to the extreme, at all.

gobears
March 4th, 2011, 04:30 PM
Thanks for the lesson. I disagree with you. I never worry about anyone else's child, just root them along. And, it is untrue that "most" parents take it to the extreme. Most parents don't take it to the extreme, at all.

Seriously. John316, where the heck do your kids swim that all the parents are hovering over all the kids all the time? My parents had NO idea what other kids' times were and barely knew my best times. They just told me how great it was that I was working so hard and getting to go to so many great meets. If they would have coached me or not let swimming be mine I probably would have burned out before I got to experience elite competition.

geochuck
March 4th, 2011, 07:39 PM
Father Know's Best is not true when it comes to coaching.

rtodd
March 4th, 2011, 08:43 PM
If it is a good program, I think you will find that coaches know exactly what is going on with your kid. I occasionally watch practice and always bite my tongue when I want to speak out and sure enough I eventually see the coaches correcting what I see and probably more than I don't. If you have an open dialogue with the coach, you will find they know alot more about your kid than you think. I have found that swimming is a process that takes years. Gotta be patient.

pwolf66
March 4th, 2011, 09:26 PM
If it is a good program, I think you will find that coaches know exactly what is going on with your kid. I occasionally watch practice and always bite my tongue when I want to speak out and sure enough I eventually see the coaches correcting what I see and probably more than I don't. If you have an open dialogue with the coach, you will find they know alot more about your kid than you think. I have found that swimming is a process that takes years. Gotta be patient.


This is so true. 2-3 years ago I honestly thought there was something physically wrong with my daughter as she had the ugliest freestyle. She was strong but just all over the place. I had serious doubts about her having any real future in swimming. But now she has one of the smoothest strokes and is knocking on the door of AA times in the 200 and 500 free.

Swimming takes time and even then there are no guarantees. But if success can defined as doing your best to improve day after day then swimming can be a wonderful experience.

Tri-ingToTurn40
March 5th, 2011, 09:13 AM
In our swim team manual it says parents are not to talk to the swimmers or the coaches during practice times. That makes sense on so many levels, not the least of which is we're paying for the practice time and there is a finite amount of it.

As for offering supplemental coaching... I never knew I wasn't supposed to. I have even said things to one of her coaches like, "When Z and I were at the pool together the other day..." They didn't bust me. lol

I've felt it was like supplemental teaching. We practice reading at home, drill math facts, do science experiments, etc.

I trust both her school teachers and her swim coaches to do an excellent job. I just know that they have a lot of students/swimmers, and I can give my kid one-on-one attention.

For the record, my daughter is 10 and in her first year of YMCA swim team.

rtodd
March 5th, 2011, 09:41 AM
Yes, we need to help with homework and so many other things. In my opinion, doing well in school is not an option and trying to get to the Olympics is optional. I think a few people have said this already, but it is nice to let your kid have swimming to themselves and take ownership of it. The coach/swimmer relationship can be a great thing without the confusion of what their other coach(parent) will have to say after every race or practice. Having the coach take all the resposibility can be a great thing down the road when they assign hard sets and practices, that way your kids vent on the coach in the car instead of on you and why you are doing this to them.

chowmi
March 5th, 2011, 09:41 PM
This is so true. 2-3 years ago I honestly thought there was something physically wrong with my daughter as she had the ugliest freestyle. She was strong but just all over the place. I had serious doubts about her having any real future in swimming. But now she has one of the smoothest strokes and is knocking on the door of AA times in the 200 and 500 free.

Swimming takes time and even then there are no guarantees. But if success can defined as doing your best to improve day after day then swimming can be a wonderful experience.


Yes, it takes time!

It is not always those with early talent that succeed! And in fact, there are many that I can recall that fade out rather quickly. Somewhat sad when their names become a verb, such as "pulling an SG", meaning to burn out like SG (initials of that girl). No amount of side coaching would have changed anything. My kids love to hear the story of how a USA coach came to our house scouting my brother & sister as 10 year olds. My mom said, OK, but you have to take Michelle, too! I was that bad!!

Here is a cut & paste from the USA team I attach with:






Mustang Monthly- Internet Edition

November 2008
A Refresher on our Team Philosophy


Those that have been on the Dallas Mustangs for a while know what our teamís philosophy is. Those of you who are new to the team might not. Regardless of which category you fall into, it is always a good idea to remember why being a part of the Dallas Mustangs can be a long and worthwhile experience. Much of that experience is driven by the philosophy that the team embraces.
Our philosophy is simply this: to develop an enjoyable and competitive program for each swimmer based on their skill, age, and interest. We donít believe in pushing the younger age groups, mentally or physically. The focus at that age should be on technique and beginning to build an endurance foundation that will continue to help the swimmer throughout his or her swimming career. Pushing a childís development too early or too quickly can be detrimental to the athlete in the long run. United States Swimming research shows the percentage of those athletes, who were ranked in the top 16 when they were younger, that were still ranked when they were in the 17-18 age group. The percentages were:
11% of ranked 10 and under went on to be ranked as 17-18 year olds
16% of ranked 11-12ís went on to be ranked as 17-18 year olds
33% of ranked 13-14ís went on to be ranked as 17-18 year olds
51% of ranked 15-16ís went on to be ranked as 17-18 year olds
This shows that early success does not necessarily translate into long term success. Therefore, itís important to be patient. Let the body grow and develop, while working on correcting strokes and building an aerobic base.
The older Dallas Mustang age groups are challenged and are expected to contribute to the Dallas Mustangsí continued national presence. There is obviously a high level of commitment and sacrifice needed to accomplish this lofty goal. We are also preparing those athletes to be successful at the college level.
We expect all of our swimmers to treat others as they would like to be treated and to take the lessons that they learn from our program into every aspect of their lives. And we expect all of our swimmers to support each other. A big reason for the success of our program over the years is due to our team concept, which really shows when itís relay time!
Swimming is an incredible sport, with incredible people. Thank you for being a part of our great program. GO MUSTANGS!!
Mook Rhodenbaugh Ė Head Coach