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View Full Version : I have a question about world records and non-textile suits



havepoolwillswim
April 7th, 2011, 12:10 AM
I'm pretty ignorant about this subject so I appreciate your feedback to this basic question. If the non-textile suits are now illegal, why are world records that were set in them still recognized?

Bobinator
April 7th, 2011, 01:05 AM
I guess because they were legal when they were wearing them.
Did they keep track of the type suit the record holders were wearing?
Unless they kept impeccable suit records it would be hard to withdraw a record or ** it.

Rykno
April 7th, 2011, 06:11 AM
the official records stand, but those that like stats are always making reference to the fastest time since before tech suits.

for example the recent 400m swim Sun Yan (19) swam 3:41.48. the current WR 3:40.07 Biedermann and the pre-tech suit era 3:40.08 Ian Thorpe.

so people who care about stats know. for the rest of us we'll just have to wait until 2012 to see how many of the 2009 records will get broken.

knelson
April 7th, 2011, 10:29 AM
I guess because they were legal when they were wearing them.

Exactly correct. Rules change all the time. The world records are never "reset" due to rules changes.

havepoolwillswim
April 7th, 2011, 11:37 AM
Thanks for the feedback.

Does anyone know why the non-textile suits were made illegal?

I know that equipment technology has evolved in other sports. I suppose it was bound to happen with swimming.

ande
April 7th, 2011, 12:13 PM
That's how FINA the ruling body decided to do it

In my opinion, it's not really fair. Some rubber suit WRs will get broken by swimmers in textile suits. Last year Ryan Lochte broke the 200 & 400 SCM IM WRs. But many WRs done by swimmers wearing full body rubber suits are extremely fast and may never get broken.

WRs have returned to normal which is: hard to break and seldom broken.

Swimming World now refers to the fastest times ever in the new suits as "TEXTILE BESTS"

If all the suit records were to be askerisked and reset.
How far back should the ruling body go?
Full body suits have been around since 92 but more wide spread since the 2000 olympics. However many swimmers opted to wear jammers and legskins in the 2004 Olympics. Not as many in the 2008 Games.
Many WRs fell when the Speedo PRO came on the market and even more got broken with swimmers wearing LZRs & Jakeds.

I'm not as worried about masters records, because as younger faster swimmers age up, records will continue to fall. Especially if swimmers (who trained and competed at elite levels into their mid to late 30's and even early 40's) take up masters swimming, they should be able to easily obliterate masters records. I bet in a decade or 2 we're likely to see a 50 year old break 20 in the 50 free & 45 in the 100.

Here's what suits are currently legal.



I'm pretty ignorant about this subject so I appreciate your feedback to this basic question. If the non-textile suits are now illegal, why are world records that were set in them still recognized?

pdjang
April 7th, 2011, 12:26 PM
I'm not as worried about masters records, because as younger faster swimmers age up, records will continue to fall. Especially if swimmers (who trained and competed at elite levels into their mid to late 30's and even early 40's) take up masters swimming, they should be able to easily obliterate masters records. I bet in a decade or 2 we're likely to see a 50 year old break 20 in the 50 free & 45 in the 100.

Rowdy Gaines went 46.90 in the 100 free at USMS SCYNats in a rubber suit last year. I believe his best time in college was a 42 low for the 100. I'd wager that Ande's prediction is almost a given. If one expects a 5 second increase given a 30 year span, Nathan Adrian has a pretty good chance (assuming he stays in shape and swims).

havepoolwillswim
April 8th, 2011, 12:25 AM
Thanks Ande

Dolphin 2
April 8th, 2011, 12:44 AM
I'm pretty ignorant about this subject so I appreciate your feedback to this basic question. If the non-textile suits are now illegal, why are world records that were set in them still recognized?

Your question accentuates the problem of how a previously "unmechanized" athletic activity (that required only a bare minimum of clothing to perform -no pun intended) became complicated by the introduction of "suit technology".

Trying to revisit the issue of whether the world records (gained through suit technology) should remain is going to be a rather messy process (like a cat trying scratch up a pile of you-know-what on a marble floor). So just for the sake of not making an even bigger mess, the past records should just be allowed to remain.

However my opinion for the future is to go back to the 70"s and 80's era suits and see how records are set with everyone playing on a level field (a level pool to be exact). That would fianlly get the the can of worms sealed up. :worms:

D2