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View Full Version : Glad I Decided To Visit Physical Therapist



riseforms
April 7th, 2011, 12:02 PM
I swam a few years ago for the first time in a competitive/push myself kind of way. Gave it up due to shoulder pain. Started a couple months back again and started feeling tweaks. Been watching form, stretching, etc. but visited a PT to look at what I can do.

I'm sharing because maybe you suffer from the same issues. The PT tested my strength in all shoulder muscles/movements. My "front" muscles (the ones used in swimming) were very strong. He put all of his 220 lbs on my arms while holding various positions, pulled on my arms, head, etc. while holding various positions. I wasn't budging and he was impressed.

Then he had me lie down and hold positions that the muscles along the posterior that aren't used when swimming (lower traps, infraspinatus, supraspinatus, etc) and WOW was I weak. It wasn't even a fight actually, my 6 year old daughter could probably have won each of those battles.

To top it off, I have some nasty knots in an around the shoulder blades. When he pressed in certain areas the pain shot to the front and was the exact pain I feel sometimes after swimming. I've always thought the pain on the front of my shoulders and around my traps were from something wrong with them. Turns out it is pain referring from behind.

So he'll be working a few things out with me over the next few weeks and the goal will be Stretching the "front" muscles better, improving posture, building those weak muscles on the back and some massage/techniques to work on the knots on those same muscles. He mentioned "Upper Cross Syndrome" and it makes total sense.

I hunch over a computer all day, drive to client sites a lot of days and have generally bad posture.

I know it has been said in a few forums here but if you are having shoulder pain, don't forget to focus on building those supporting muscles and work on stretching the swimming muscles better.

JimRude
April 7th, 2011, 12:14 PM
I swam a few years ago for the first time in a competitive/push myself kind of way. Gave it up due to shoulder pain. Started a couple months back again and started feeling tweaks. Been watching form, stretching, etc. but visited a PT to look at what I can do.

I'm sharing because maybe you suffer from the same issues. The PT tested my strength in all shoulder muscles/movements. My "front" muscles (the ones used in swimming) were very strong. He put all of his 220 lbs on my arms while holding various positions, pulled on my arms, head, etc. while holding various positions. I wasn't budging and he was impressed.

Then he had me lie down and hold positions that the muscles along the posterior that aren't used when swimming (lower traps, infraspinatus, supraspinatus, etc) and WOW was I weak. It wasn't even a fight actually, my 6 year old daughter could probably have won each of those battles.

To top it off, I have some nasty knots in an around the shoulder blades. When he pressed in certain areas the pain shot to the front and was the exact pain I feel sometimes after swimming. I've always thought the pain on the front of my shoulders and around my traps were from something wrong with them. Turns out it is pain referring from behind.

So he'll be working a few things out with me over the next few weeks and the goal will be Stretching the "front" muscles better, improving posture, building those weak muscles on the back and some massage/techniques to work on the knots on those same muscles. He mentioned "Upper Cross Syndrome" and it makes total sense.

I hunch over a computer all day, drive to client sites a lot of days and have generally bad posture.

I know it has been said in a few forums here but if you are having shoulder pain, don't forget to focus on building those supporting muscles and work on stretching the swimming muscles better.

Begin a regimen of alternating rounds of push-ups and pull/chin ups. Did wonders for my shoulder pain.:2cents:

swimshark
April 7th, 2011, 08:25 PM
Good luck with healing. I know how nasty it is when a swimmer has bad shoulders.

aquajock
April 8th, 2011, 01:45 PM
Most of us live front-of-the-body dominant lives. To bring the upper postural muscles back into balance (which allows everything to move more freely in the shoulder girdle), the back muscles must be stretched and the pectorals stretched. Low and high rows work well along with wall angels and pectoral stretches over a foam roller.