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Grif
May 12th, 2011, 08:24 AM
Strength training is a necessary component to a swimmers training regimen. Without a strength training program a coach leaves his swimmers at more of a risk for muscle imbalances, weaknesses, and inefficiencies, which can lead to injuries and at best will result in swimmers not reaching their potential. It is necessary to include training outside of the water but it takes careful planning to make sure that the content of work is quality and good use is made of this time spent.
An efficient team training format combined with the proper planning and exercise selection allows a coach to address the many different needs of a strength program in a very time efficient format. An organized dryland program will allow coaches to manipulate different variables such as volume, load, speed and other methods of increasing or decreasing intensity. Doing so will allow proper periodization which is crucial to peak performance!
One of our main goals is injury prevention. We realize that in swimming many overuse injuries exist. By using a total body approach to our strength program we address many of the issues that result in our injuries, namely joint instability and muscle imbalances. We also want to emphasize that teaching the proper technique of an exercise is necessary before putting them in a timed circuit that is moving at a fast pace. Running your athletes through a high tempo circuit where everyone has poor technique is pointless. Exercises should be performed slowly at first to make sure they are performed correctly. We teach them one at a time until proper form is attained. Never perform an exercise in a range of motion that shows lack of control, this is so important to ensure the athlete stays injury free. Once control is shown with good technique then it is time to apply it in a circuit format.
The long term goal of these circuits is for an athletes power, ability to tolerate lactic acid, core strength, total body strength, and joint stability all to increase. As we mentioned earlier, if the athlete is hurt then none of these goals will be achieved! Train Hard but more importantly Train Smart!

DJae
June 21st, 2011, 06:36 PM
I agree that spending time on exercises that help with injury prevention is important, but I am only aware of the exercises that are isolating, such as shoulder raises, rather than functional and unfortunately adding these to the 3 day/week program quickly eat up the time I have with the swimmers. I find myself eliminating those all too frequently to leave time for core and circuit workouts. I'm interested in the total body exercises that you mentioned and whether or not they are just as effective as isolated exercises in preventing common injuries.

Grif
June 23rd, 2011, 10:06 PM
I agree that spending time on exercises that help with injury prevention is important, but I am only aware of the exercises that are isolating, such as shoulder raises, rather than functional and unfortunately adding these to the 3 day/week program quickly eat up the time I have with the swimmers. I find myself eliminating those all too frequently to leave time for core and circuit workouts. I'm interested in the total body exercises that you mentioned and whether or not they are just as effective as isolated exercises in preventing common injuries.


Here is an exercise that integrates core and shoulder stability all in one.

YouTube - ‪Dynamic shoulder exerciselGrif Fig and Adam Brush‬‏

A strong core is just as important as strong rotator cuff muscles possibly more important). If someone has a weak core it will not matter how strong their tiny rotator cuff muscles are - they will not be able to handle stress if they have to do all the work.

qbrain
June 24th, 2011, 09:47 AM
If someone has a weak core it will not matter how strong their tiny rotator cuff muscles are - they will not be able to handle stress if they have to do all the work.

Do you have a point of reference for this statement?

aquageek
June 24th, 2011, 10:00 AM
I bought a titanium power bracelet and all my muscle imbalances and deficiencies were immediately solved. And, I don't tip over any more. It also has magic magnets in it so I can point due north whenever I want.

It is Jazzdrip approved (http://www.acemagnetics.com/titanium.html?gclid=CKq8rebZzqkCFUff4Aod2hRWMQ), to boot.

Grif
June 24th, 2011, 02:20 PM
Do you have a point of reference for this statement?


Sorry man - no research to back this up, just a common sense approach. If I wait for the research to come out I'll be doing this training in 15 years if I'm lucky. I use it with my swimmers, Major League Baseball players, volleyball players with great success.

Also, old school rotator cuff exercises are often done with the humerus at the side of the body. The shoulder is most vunerable in the overhead position so at least the exercises should be done this way.

pwb
June 24th, 2011, 02:21 PM
Strength training is a necessary component to a swimmers training regimen. I'm living proof it is not necessary.

If you're looking to advertise here, I'm sure USMS has options for you to pay to advertise. Please don't use the forums as a pitch platform.

Grif
June 24th, 2011, 02:23 PM
I bought a titanium power bracelet and all my muscle imbalances and deficiencies were immediately solved. And, I don't tip over any more. It also has magic magnets in it so I can point due north whenever I want.

It is Jazzdrip approved (http://www.acemagnetics.com/titanium.html?gclid=CKq8rebZzqkCFUff4Aod2hRWMQ), to boot.

Nice! Now that is a great product :)

Grif
June 24th, 2011, 02:35 PM
I'm living proof it is not necessary.

If you're looking to advertise here, I'm sure USMS has options for you to pay to advertise. Please don't use the forums as a pitch platform.

Hey man - I am just here to share my ideas and inspire others to create their own ideas in dryland training and create discussions. I dont think I ever asked anyone to buy anything on this board.

On the first comment - you got me. It is not "necessary" to have a strength program to be a swimmer. That is correct, you can have some success. However, it is obvious that strength training will benefit someone's swimming career. I would't think someone would imply that just swimming is better than swimming and strength training. Who knows, its 2012 and people still are static stretching right before a 50 free like its 1975...

aquageek
June 24th, 2011, 03:08 PM
It is not "necessary" to have a strength program to be a swimmer. That is correct, you can have some success. However, it is obvious that strength training will benefit someone's swimming career. I would't think someone would imply that just swimming is better than swimming and strength training. Who knows, its 2012 and people still are static stretching right before a 50 free like its 1975...

This statement, alone in a vacuum, is potentially true but we aren't kids. Time constraints, such as kids, jobs, travel, etc dramatically impact the time we can spend training. This leaves most swimmers with trade-offs to make. I'm not sure that sacrificing swim training for strength training gives you the bang for the buck that many believe. I do have a hunch, but can't prove it, that a well rounded fitness routine may keep your interest in your favorite sport (i.e. swimming) higher.