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aquageek
September 22nd, 2011, 09:18 AM
I frequently hear folks whine about not doing OW because open water is gross, dirty, scary, full of germs, etc.

Well, here you go:

http://www.cnn.com/2011/09/22/health/chlorine-indoor-swimming-pools/index.html?hpt=hp_bn11

pendaluft
September 22nd, 2011, 10:48 AM
My favorite paragraph:

"In June, Bernard published a study in the International Journal of Andrology linking chlorine with testicular damage. Swimming in indoor, chlorinated pools during childhood was shown to reduce levels of serum inhibin B and total testosterone, both indicators of sperm count and mobility. Bernard notes in the study summary that the "highly permeable scrotum" allows chlorine to be absorbed into the body."

Glad we converted to salt water!

Seriously though, the respiratory effects of chlorine are still being debated in Pulmonary circles -- I think the issue is far from settled in that regard.

Peter Cruise
September 22nd, 2011, 11:00 AM
Yes, but just think of all the bad-for-you sodium being absorbed through that same highly permeable area, as well...

KatieK
September 22nd, 2011, 11:14 AM
So I guess swimmers will be going extinct?

I'm never sure what the difference is between a chlorine pool and a saltwater pool. Salt = NaCl, so when the salt dissolves in the water, you get a pool full of chlorine ions.

pendaluft
September 22nd, 2011, 03:30 PM
I'm never sure what the difference is between a chlorine pool and a saltwater pool. Salt = NaCl, so when the salt dissolves in the water, you get a pool full of chlorine ions.

I've wondered that myself -- but it really feels different on your skin.

yedswim
September 22nd, 2011, 08:36 PM
So I guess swimmers will be going extinct?

I'm never sure what the difference is between a chlorine pool and a saltwater pool. Salt = NaCl, so when the salt dissolves in the water, you get a pool full of chlorine ions.

When you pour Salt on water you don't split the molecule in Na and Cl...you just dissolve the salt in water and get salted water. If you want to split the molecule, you need a chemical reaction like electrolysis applied to molten Salt.

There are clearly health benefits with salt Water pools the downside is that you you need to run your pump 24/7 (energy) and corrosion (maintenance)

orca1946
September 22nd, 2011, 10:51 PM
So all of a sudden , sitting in traffic with my windows open is better??:worms:

nhc
September 22nd, 2011, 11:17 PM
Doesn't salt water make some people's faces swollen, like happening in ocean swimming?

KatieK
September 23rd, 2011, 10:46 AM
When you pour Salt on water you don't split the molecule in Na and Cl...you just dissolve the salt in water and get salted water. If you want to split the molecule, you need a chemical reaction like electrolysis applied to molten Salt.
NaCL is an ionic bond. When its in solution, the positive Na ions and negative Cl ions actually do mill about on their own. That's why saltwater is a better conductor of electricity than fresh water.

jaadams1
September 23rd, 2011, 11:14 AM
NaCL is an ionic bond. When its in solution, the positive Na ions and negative Cl ions actually do mill about on their own. That's why saltwater is a better conductor of electricity than fresh water.

Then we should be just fine swimming in a fresh water lake in a thunderstorm vs. the open ocean?? Yikes!! :afraid:

orca1946
September 23rd, 2011, 06:22 PM
And they kick us out of the INDOOR POOL when they detect lightning!!!!!

yedswim
September 23rd, 2011, 06:52 PM
NaCL is an ionic bond. When its in solution, the positive Na ions and negative Cl ions actually do mill about on their own. That's why saltwater is a better conductor of electricity than fresh water.
I stand corrected....

KatieK
September 23rd, 2011, 07:01 PM
Don't try this at home, BUT, I don't worry about lightning in the pool. If they close the public pool due to lightning, I just head to my neighborhood pool.

Try Googling "pool lightning deaths" and see how many you find. I found zero. Just a bunch of articles on how it could theoretically be a problem. The parking lot is more dangerous than the pool itself. In any case, it's easier to find incidents of people who've been struck by lightning in parking lots.

I *would* be worried about lighting on a boat. It's the tallest thing sticking up out of a large flat surface of water. A pool is a small surface, usually surrounded by taller things that are more likely to draw the lightning strike.

pwb
September 23rd, 2011, 07:19 PM
Don't try this at home, BUT, I don't worry about lightning in the pool. If they close the public pool due to lightning, I just head to my neighborhood pool.

Try Googling "pool lightning deaths" and see how many you find. I found zero.
Hmmm ... I might just try this at home. I found this quote:

"
The Redwoods Group Insurance Program for YMCAs
Risk Management Topic

Lightning Safety

According to the National Lightning Safety Institute, lightning kills more people in the U.S. each year than hurricanes and tornadoes combined, with 756 people killed between 1990 and 2003."


here ...http://www.redwoodsgroup.com/YMCA/RMTLightningSafety.asp ... which seems to be the total number of people killed by lightning, not just by pool - lightning strikes.


Maybe I will try this at home ... swimming through the storm.

orca1946
September 23rd, 2011, 11:37 PM
They say lightning will follow the pipes into the pool area to get us?????

KatieK
September 24th, 2011, 11:39 AM
They say lightning will follow the pipes into the pool area to get us?????

Anything's possible. My old boss used to call this kind of thinking "Too smart by half."