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1morelength
October 27th, 2011, 01:20 PM
Hi everyone

Does anyone know of any dry land core strengthening exercises, mainly to help with my body rotation in freestyle, and my general stroke in butterfly.

Cheers

Andy

aquajock
October 28th, 2011, 12:11 PM
Sure! Here's a few of my favs. 1 - Bicycles with elbows behind head and taking shoulders toward opposite knees on the push. 2 - Medicine ball sideways throws with rotation and core bracing. 3 - Side planks, side BOSU planks. 4 - On all fours reach and crunch (extend right arm and left leg and then draw hand and bent knee in under body, crunching abdomen. Do 12 and then switch sides). 5- Ball Pass on back - pass stablity ball back and forth between hands and feet, extending arms and legs in between.

tomtopo
October 28th, 2011, 07:07 PM
List of Exercises using stretch cords / surgical tubing
The exercises listed below are done with opposing muscle groups. Most of the exercises can be done while lying on your back but alternative methods can accomplish the same outcomes. There are different ways to anchor the stretch cord safely. Our team uses numerous round posts that are located in our pool balcony. The posts are cemented into the floor and cannot move. I personally use a three inch nylon belt that has a knot on both ends. I use the door jam located opposite the door knob and then close the door which exposes a loop that provides the anchor. The pool also has sixty feet of metal rope coated with plastic attached to the wall with a series of eye-bolts (two feet apart from each other). Towels are used as a buffer between the rubber and the plastic coated rope.
The resistance of the cord varies but I’ve found that the heavy or large diameter stretch cords don’t hold up very well. We use medium to light resistance stretch cords with soft handles. I suggest that you buy one cord and try it out before you buy a bulk quantity. Most strech cords will hold up very well (a boy’s and a girl’s season of three times per week is about all you’re going to get from a set. The cost of the stretch cords I purchased was approximately seven dollars.
1. LAT PULLS – STRAIGHT ARM, 45 DEGREES, 90 DEGREES
2. TRICEPS – KNUCKLES UP, KNUCKLES DOWN, BUTTERFLY PULL/BREASTSTROKE PULL-OUT, ELBOWS UP PULL DOWNS
3. LAT PULL – OPPOSITE OF A MILITARY PRESS
4. SIT UPS
5. SIT UP ROW – ARMPITS EXPOSED, ELBOWS TO THE SIDE / RIBS, REVERSE FLYS (HIGH, MIDDLE, LOW)
6. REVERSE LAT PULLS – STRAIGHT ARM, 45 DEGREES, 90 DEGREES
7. BICEPS – KNUCKLES DOWN REGULAR CURLS, KNUCKLES UP REVERSE CURLS, ROWING, MILITARY PRESS
8. STANDING CHEST FLYS – HIGH, MIDDLE, LOW
9. STANDING, BENCH PRESS, BENT ARM (NEAR RIBS) PRESS, STANDING TRICEPS PRESS
10. SHOULDER CUFF- EMPTY CAN, FULL CAN, ROTATE KNUCKLES UP, ROTATE KNUCKLES DOWN, ABDUCTOR/ ADDUCTOR (ELBOWS INTO SIDE 90 DEGREE BEND)
11. CORE – HIGH, MIDDLE LOW, OPPOSITE SIDE HIGH, MIDDLE, LOW
12. LUNGE, CALF, SOLEUS
13. BREASTSTROKE SQUAT WITH DIPS
14. ANKLE STRETCHING MANUAL AND WITH TOWEL BEHIND TOES

Strech Cord Exercises for your Swim Team, For your family and for You - YouTube

Jazz Hands
October 28th, 2011, 07:12 PM
Front squat 225 pounds.

The Fortress
October 28th, 2011, 07:13 PM
List of Exercises using stretch cords / surgical tubing
The exercises listed below are done with opposing muscle groups. Most of the exercises can be done while lying on your back but alternative methods can accomplish the same outcomes. There are different ways to anchor the stretch cord safely. Our team uses numerous round posts that are located in our pool balcony. The posts are cemented into the floor and cannot move. I personally use a three inch nylon belt that has a knot on both ends. I use the door jam located opposite the door knob and then close the door which exposes a loop that provides the anchor. The pool also has sixty feet of metal rope coated with plastic attached to the wall with a series of eye-bolts (two feet apart from each other). Towels are used as a buffer between the rubber and the plastic coated rope.
The resistance of the cord varies but I’ve found that the heavy or large diameter stretch cords don’t hold up very well. We use medium to light resistance stretch cords with soft handles. I suggest that you buy one cord and try it out before you buy a bulk quantity. Most strech cords will hold up very well (a boy’s and a girl’s season of three times per week is about all you’re going to get from a set. The cost of the stretch cords I purchased was approximately seven dollars.
1. LAT PULLS – STRAIGHT ARM, 45 DEGREES, 90 DEGREES
2. TRICEPS – KNUCKLES UP, KNUCKLES DOWN, BUTTERFLY PULL/BREASTSTROKE PULL-OUT, ELBOWS UP PULL DOWNS
3. LAT PULL – OPPOSITE OF A MILITARY PRESS
4. SIT UPS
5. SIT UP ROW – ARMPITS EXPOSED, ELBOWS TO THE SIDE / RIBS, REVERSE FLYS (HIGH, MIDDLE, LOW)
6. REVERSE LAT PULLS – STRAIGHT ARM, 45 DEGREES, 90 DEGREES
7. BICEPS – KNUCKLES DOWN REGULAR CURLS, KNUCKLES UP REVERSE CURLS, ROWING, MILITARY PRESS
8. STANDING CHEST FLYS – HIGH, MIDDLE, LOW
9. STANDING, BENCH PRESS, BENT ARM (NEAR RIBS) PRESS, STANDING TRICEPS PRESS
10. SHOULDER CUFF- EMPTY CAN, FULL CAN, ROTATE KNUCKLES UP, ROTATE KNUCKLES DOWN, ABDUCTOR/ ADDUCTOR (ELBOWS INTO SIDE 90 DEGREE BEND)
11. CORE – HIGH, MIDDLE LOW, OPPOSITE SIDE HIGH, MIDDLE, LOW
12. LUNGE, CALF, SOLEUS
13. BREASTSTROKE SQUAT WITH DIPS
14. ANKLE STRETCHING MANUAL AND WITH TOWEL BEHIND TOES

Strech Cord Exercises for your Swim Team, For your family and for You - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDfgpVXhzhI)

Why use tubing as opposed to actual weights?

Agree with Jazz, more bang for your buck with squats, deadlifts, etc.

For isolated core work, I like the power wheel and some suspended exercises on the TRX.

quicksilver
October 28th, 2011, 09:20 PM
-ab wheel*

-lifting mini-coopers off the ground

-volunteer to carry old ladies across the street at busy intersections

-become a rick shaw driver in San Francisco

-join the circus and wrestle alligators and bears

*The ab wheel only costs $10.99 and gives fast results.

SolarEnergy
October 28th, 2011, 09:25 PM
Hi everyone

Does anyone know of any dry land core strengthening exercises, mainly to help with my body rotation in freestyle, and my general stroke in butterfly.

Cheers

Andy What's wrong with your body rotation at the moment? Have you been told things? Or do you feel anything wrong with it?

Age? (roughly)

Already member at some gym?

And when you mention the fly, what would you like to improve?

For fly, an excellent core exercise happens to be in the pool, simple, kick in all position, favor back. Also do kick on both sides. Arms extended over head. Kicking upstraight position, arms above water, kick kick kick. All good for core.

Most people have enough core strength to rotate quite easily when swimming free style, especially at slow to moderate speed. As for fly, hmmmm I'd say you need abdominals which are very nicely trained whilst kicking (fly) on your back (abuse here, like n time 100m of this) and a fair core routine, dryland that targets core muscles, pilates does an excellent job at this. If you take a class, learn some exercises, and do them home you should have a lot of fun whilst improving ability to better feel body rotation and work the fly kicking too.

Pure strength, or requirement for more power becomes important as you want to improve your sprinting abilitites. So if you're at the stage of learning to rotate (like early into your 'freestyler' career), then lifting heavy weight won't make any good to you.

1morelength
October 29th, 2011, 01:10 AM
Thanks for all the suggestions, forgot about the ab wheel will have to get one soon as. My body rotation feels ok as does my fly undulation, but I'm trying to cut my free stroke rate down (currently a fustrating 25 per 25M) and I,m let to belive the rotation of the hips is where the power is generated, and I figure a bit of extra core strength will cause a little fatigue when doing butterfly.
I'm 35 years old, and only been swimming with proper technique for a few years (not sure if I'll make any podiums in 2012!) but I really enjoy it and am just trying to improve as much as I can.

Cheers again

Andy

quicksilver
October 29th, 2011, 06:58 AM
trying to cut my free stroke rate down (currently a fustrating 25 per 25M)Not trying to be critical in any way, but there's no reason you can't be in the teens for this (per lap). A good streamline at the push-off will help drop the stroke count for starters. And so will working on your reach at the catch...which is why you probably asked about rotation to begin with.

Many lap swimmers or new swimmers tend to pull back too early. It not only adds more strokes per lap, but this creates resistance. Try thinking about each stroke like the stride of a speed skater rather than paddling your torso as if it were a rubber raft. When the lead arm is out front...reach for the wall and don't claw backwards right away. Not having seen you swim, it's a good bet that this is what's going on.


...from Coach Emmett Hines...
Whenever you change stroke counts you employ different muscles or muscle fibers. If one is making a large change, say going from 24 spl (strokes per length) to 15 spl or fewer, it means using perhaps 70 percent different (and as luck would have it, completely untrained) muscles. This is the range where someone shifts from swimming primarily with their arms and legs to swimming primarily with their core body, changing the role of the arms to that of transmission rather than engine. From a muscular conditioning standpoint this is almost like starting over from scratch. There is a rather long conditioning curve just as you would expect from taking up a new sport that asks you to use previously untrained parts of your body.http://www.h2oustonswims.org/articles/questionable_stroke_counting.html


best drill for fine tuning a high stroke count: catch up drill (http://www.goswim.tv/entries/5834/freestyle---catch-up-catch.html) Swim - Drill CATCH UP - YouTube


(http://www.h2oustonswims.org)

1morelength
October 29th, 2011, 11:35 AM
Thanks for the advice and links, very helpful. I liked the analogy of a speed skater and will bear that in mind next time I'm in the pool, also I'll hold back with my catch as you suggested. I hoping to break 20 before christmas.

Cheers again

taruky
October 29th, 2011, 04:51 PM
Since this thread is about the core, let me ask something to my expert friends here. I often hear the term "engaging your core". I have gotten to the point (I think) where I do use my core without thinking about it. But I was looking at a Thorpe video I've seen dozens of times and noticed something. He seems to pull his shoulders back a bit when swimming. That reminded me of something I read on the Swimsmooth site, so I went back to it and they were talking about engaging the core by tightening the butt and pulling the scapula together a bit, like you would standing with good posture. I have never really thought about that while swimming and am wondering if I should make an effort to pull my shoulders back. It seems like that would make it harder to extend the arm, but maybe not. Anyone ever made a conscious effort to "engage the core" more besides trying to get EVF?

Jazz Hands
October 29th, 2011, 04:55 PM
Since this thread is about the core, let me ask something to my expert friends here. I often hear the term "engaging your core". I have gotten to the point (I think) where I do use my core without thinking about it. But I was looking at a Thorpe video I've seen dozens of times and noticed something. He seems to pull his shoulders back a bit when swimming. That reminded me of something I read on the Swimsmooth site, so I went back to it and they were talking about engaging the core by tightening the butt and pulling the scapula together a bit, like you would standing with good posture. I have never really thought about that while swimming and am wondering if I should make an effort to pull my shoulders back. It seems like that would make it harder to extend the arm, but maybe not. Anyone ever made a conscious effort to "engage the core" more besides trying to get EVF?

1. I think what you noticed about Thorpe is correct. That's an important part of good pulling technique. High elbows get a lot of attention, but high shoulders are also important. My guess is it puts the large muscles of the upper body in a better position to produce a lot of force.

2. Pulling the shoulder back isn't really a "core" thing as the word is usually used. But I hate that word anyway.

taruky
October 29th, 2011, 05:47 PM
1. I think what you noticed about Thorpe is correct. That's an important part of good pulling technique. High elbows get a lot of attention, but high shoulders are also important. My guess is it puts the large muscles of the upper body in a better position to produce a lot of force.

2. Pulling the shoulder back isn't really a "core" thing as the word is usually used. But I hate that word anyway.

Yeah I know, the core thing confuses me with regard to swimming. So should I try to have that good shoulder back posture all the time or just during the pull on that side?

aquajock
October 30th, 2011, 08:34 PM
Since this thread is about the core, let me ask something to my expert friends here. I often hear the term "engaging your core". I have gotten to the point (I think) where I do use my core without thinking about it. But I was looking at a Thorpe video I've seen dozens of times and noticed something. He seems to pull his shoulders back a bit when swimming. That reminded me of something I read on the Swimsmooth site, so I went back to it and they were talking about engaging the core by tightening the butt and pulling the scapula together a bit, like you would standing with good posture. I have never really thought about that while swimming and am wondering if I should make an effort to pull my shoulders back. It seems like that would make it harder to extend the arm, but maybe not. Anyone ever made a conscious effort to "engage the core" more besides trying to get EVF?

The terminology we now use is to "brace through the core" when doing activities where stability of the abdomen, pelvis and back is necessary for proper form. You can feel the abdomen brace by making a tssss sound. Rolling the pelvis under and squeezing the buttocks can prevent you from over-arching the back.

aquajock
October 30th, 2011, 08:37 PM
Why use tubing as opposed to actual weights?


You can do safer speed work with tubing (than machines and dumbbells) when used properly. It is also an excellent tool to stabilize the shoulder girdle and improve posture to prevent injuries.

Debugger
October 31st, 2011, 08:17 AM
See these videos:


Faster Swimming Core Training #1 - YouTube
Faster Swimming Core Training #2 - YouTube
Faster Swimming Core Training #3 - YouTube
Faster Swimming Core Training #4 - YouTube
Faster Swimming Core Training #5 - YouTube

__steve__
October 31st, 2011, 10:48 AM
Yoga.

I recently started doing some poses I found in a book. I thought it would help my swimming and it does, I think. Some require flexibility or balance, and some need tremendous core strength and stability to maintain, like the peacock. Here you basically hold yourself in the horizontal plank position, but only the hands support your weight, rest of your body is in the air. I can only hold for 15 seconds before I loose balance or stamina.

1morelength
November 3rd, 2011, 04:00 AM
Cheers Steve
Will look into some basic yoga

Sojerz
November 7th, 2011, 10:39 AM
Here's a good article on what is meant by the core swimming muscles :
http://www.swimmingcoach.org/articles/JL06132002.asp .

Had a chance to swim with Coach Silvia during HS in the mid-60s, two or three summers at Pine Knoll SS and some lessons too. Wish I had been older, more of it stuck, and that i kept my notes and handouts.

Sojerz
November 7th, 2011, 05:14 PM
This is a link to a second article by Marshall Adams on this subject:
http://www.swimmingworldmagazine.com/articles/swimtechnique/articles/200007-01st_art.asp
In the first article he points out that Silvia identified four distinct mechanically superior parts of the stroke that Rose, and more recently Thorpe and others utilize. Silvia called them the "big four" and they are:
"
Inertial shoulder girdle elevation and upward scapular rotation
Shoulder joint medial rotation and elbow flexion
Shoulder joint adduction and downward scapular motion
Inertial round-off and release (partial supination and shoulder joint lateral rotation). "

In the first article Marshall indicates:

"The effective 'core' muscles for shoulder adduction used in all swimming strokes are the great trunk muscles that originate from the chest and back of the body (core) and have their insertions on the upper arm (humerus) bone. Many muscles originate from the chest and back but these muscles are the major adductors that work to bring the arm (humerus) in toward the mid-line of the body (adduction). The muscles include the latissimus dorsi, and teres major on the back (posterior) and the pectoralis major on the front (anterior). The teres major originates along the lateral boarder of the scapula, thus this important adductor muscle does not completely follow the definition of a core muscle since it does not arise from the trunk but arises from a bone that is close to the trunk. The scapula glides on the surface of the body's rib cage.
Why are these major muscles that for the most part originate from the 'body core' so important for effective swimming technique over and above other muscles which are also capable of producing or assisting in shoulder adduction? The answer can be found in the structure of the shoulder joint and the nature of these major 'core' muscles. These muscles are large, relatively powerful and are served well by the proximity of the heart's fresh blood supply. "

If you do some dry land work to build strength in these core muscles, drills to build the mechanics described by the Silvia's big four, and KICK drills, you'll soon be swimming like Thorpe! :) At any rate, read the first article if you want to learn where the core concept came from more than 50 years ago, and the second article if you want to learn how we went astray with S strokes.

swimBRCT
November 7th, 2011, 05:15 PM
When you retract your shoulders, you're engaging your trapezius muscles, which help stabilize your shoulders by engaging the little muscles. (I came across an article with citations for this but I don't feel like going through my history right now, if you're curious reply to this and I"ll dig out the citation.)

Food for thought... when you pull just from your shoulder, you've got a second class lever (fulcrum is at the glenohumeral joint = where your upper arm attaches to your torso; effort= muscles around that joint)... but note in Silvia's description the "inertial" parts. (Shoulder girdle elevation and rounding off the end of the stroke).

I have reason to believe that what you get when you retract your shoulders is that you strengthen the connectivity between the two upper arms, such that you get a 1st class lever, which is much more efficient (so some of the downward rotation from the hand dropping down into the entry transfers to the finish of the other arm... Jonty Skinner went over this in closer detail in the goswim.tv forums a while back with his "angular momentum" theorizing. You can get angular momentum to help you out if you use a straightarm recovery, and tightening the traps by retracting the shoulders serves to enable that.

Regarding the core... Todd Sayce ran an excellent series about core work for swimmers. Start with "sit up saga".

http://saycoperformance.com/blog/category/core/

Think about what the core encompasses. It's not just the "abs" (colloquially, the 6 back, aka the rectus abdominus)... think about what you want your core do be doing. Do you want to be flexing (curling forward)while you swim? Or do you want to be keeping a straight and stiff body line?

Core work for short and axis long axis strokes is different. (So what helps your butterfly undulation may not DIRECTLY (at least neurally) help your core stability in freestyle.

I have some other notes about core work, but I would suggest poking around saycoperformance, swimmingscience.net, some of Mike Robertson and Eric Cressey's articles about core strength.

I think the biggest thing with any exercise is to understand WHY you're doing the exercises (rotation? .Flexion? Extension), exactly HOW the exercise should be done, as well as what BAD FORM looks like because you don't want to injure your spinal disks. Have someone watch you.

It's easy to "cheat"... doing russian twists by moving your arms a lot so you touch the ground, but you don't really end up rotating your core... or when doing situps, bending at a bad part of your spine (lumbar, neck... not sure myself whether you want to be flexing your t spine)

Wrote this quickly, hope it makes sense, feel free to ask for clarification.

Grif
November 13th, 2011, 08:57 PM
These are good for long axis rotation

Dryland Exercises for Swimmers - YouTube

Rotational Repeat Slams - YouTube

advanced below

Dryland Swim Exercises - Swimmer push - up - YouTube

and these are good for short axis rotation


Superman - YouTube

Band Extensions - YouTube

Dryland Exercises for Swimmers - Streamline on the Bosu - YouTube

advanced below

Explosive Hypers - YouTube

__steve__
November 14th, 2011, 10:37 AM
Here's one I found:

dryland exercises.wmv - YouTube

aztimm
November 14th, 2011, 12:29 PM
Hanging leg raises give me the most bang for my time:

Hanging Leg Raises - YouTube

jaadams1
November 15th, 2011, 12:41 AM
Hanging leg raises give me the most bang for my time:

Hanging Leg Raises - YouTube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0ysNevIv0w)

I do those, but I bring my feet all the way up to the bar I'm hanging on. Gives a little added fun to the exercise too! And makes the BIG :roids: GUYS look at you and say "Wow". :bow:

robertsrobson
November 15th, 2011, 06:11 AM
I do yoga most weeks, for about 90 minutes. It depends on when I go but it is Ashtanga or Vinyasa. It took me a while to be convinced that it was worth forgoing a swim session for (it still might not be for performance, but for my general health and wellbeing I think it is) and it doesn't work any specific muscles that intensely, so you can be fooled into thinking it's not a workout, but I really value it now. I gain both in flexibility and core strength, though the flexibility focuses much more on legs and hips than shoulders.

poolraat
November 15th, 2011, 09:17 AM
I have recently started doing a 30 minute core class at my gym. Its called CXWorx and is pretty intense. This is in addition to the yoga and other core speciffic work I do as a part of my drylands/strength training work.

slow
November 17th, 2011, 07:17 AM
Thanks to everyone for sharing their ideas and workout routines. It has been helpful to me as I work my way back into shape. I'm doing about ten minutes a day of this stuff every day and it is making a difference.