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swimmasterusa
November 12th, 2011, 01:06 PM
I hear that you should not breathe every stroke in fly because it causes you to become vertical for more time during your swim, but one thing that I do not understand is that when I swim fly and come up for a breath everystroke, not only does it seem easier for me, but I take less strokes per lap, and I go faster. Any thoughts or ideas??

White Lightning
November 12th, 2011, 01:23 PM
I believe this is a highly individualized issue. It will depend on your stroke mechanics, training, and natural ability. As much as I would love to breath every stroke, it is simply much slower for me this way--and probably has to do with my poor core strength and depressing kicking ability. In the end you will select a breathing pattern that is faster, and not necessarily the one you like.

jaadams1
November 12th, 2011, 03:35 PM
I will try to maintain a 2-up, 1-down breathing pattern for the 200 Fly, or anything longer, mainly for the reason you stated: keeping the hips from dropping too low in the water and swimming "uphill". The 50 and 100 or more about speed and less breathing though, but don't forget to breathe.

SolarEnergy
November 13th, 2011, 03:00 PM
I hear that you should not breathe every stroke in fly because it causes you to become vertical for more time during your swim, but one thing that I do not understand is that when I swim fly and come up for a breath everystroke, not only does it seem easier for me, but I take less strokes per lap, and I go faster. Any thoughts or ideas?? That's odd though, there's probably some slight glitches with your stroke. It may be that when you breathe, you actually perform the undulation better maybe?

Because normally, you shouldn't be faster breathing every stroke compare to every other stroke. Now that said, in my case when race fit, there's only a .3sec delta between my 50fly (SCM) breathing only 3 or 4 times in the whole 50, and a 50fly breathing every stroke (30.3 vs 30.6). Never really tested breathing every other with breathing every stroke, I'd expect this difference to be even smaller.

That's probably why several fly specialists (100/200) choose to breathe every stroke. The increase in O2 intake compensates for the loss in speed. I might also add that my stroke technique is built on a continuous body undulation including a head movement that goes up and down. That's because in training, I always breathe every stroke, and I do perform speciality sets at my full stroke (along with breaststrokers as I can hardly match their speed on a sets of 100m for instance). Therefore even when I don't breathe, I still need to say 'Yes' a bit whilst swimming. My head must move up and down a bit to ease the undulation, regardless of if I'm breathing or not. This could greatly help you to, ie to raise your head as if you wanted to see the surface, even when you know you won't be taking a puff.

Finally, I certainly disagree with the idea than breathing (alone) could bring your fly down or vertical or would cause your hips to drop in a significant way. All this can be avoid by ensureing that A) you breathe by raising your head (only) above the water, not the entire upper body (see Phelps swimming the fly) and that B) you breathe early enough into the cycle (to avoid having Head, Arms, and Feet outside the water all in the same time) and that C) this breath only lasts for a "blink of the eye". This is easier done by making sure you carefully exhale (in Fly, you definitely can't afford to exhale outside the water, no time for being so sloppy). The bottom line is, head should pop up very shortly prior second kick, and must come back in the water prior the arms and prior first kick.

bud
November 15th, 2011, 09:50 AM
I hear that you should not breathe every stroke in fly because it causes you to become vertical for more time during your swim....
I agree that this is a very individualized issue.

IIRC... Michael Phelps will breathe every stroke, depending on the event, etc.

http://www.google.com/search?q=michael+phelps+fly+breath+pattern

... turned up some interesting nuggets.

;)

ande
November 15th, 2011, 10:43 AM
I hear that you should not breathe every stroke in fly because it causes you to become vertical for more time during your swim, but one thing that I do not understand is that when I swim fly and come up for a breath everystroke, not only does it seem easier for me, but I take less strokes per lap, and I go faster. Any thoughts or ideas??

It depends on:

+ the person, (your technique, conditioning and speed)
how many strokes do you take per length?

+ the course (scy, scm or LCM),

+ the race, which swim the race is in your daily meet schedule
especially how much rest you got before your fly race and

+ how many SDKs you do off each wall

+ breathe on turns

Don't breathe on your 1st stroke on the dive unless you SDKed far and it's a long race
Don't breathe the stroke before your turn
on your last length Don't breathe from the flags in or half way


figure out what works best for you for each race

50 fly
not many, have a breathing plan,
Plan on breathing zones like none on 1st length 1 in middle of 2nd length
take a big breath when you're diving in and hold it


100 fly
every stroke, every other, every 3rd stroke
some plan on so many breaths per length
the american record holder didn't breathe on the last length

100 IM (1, 2 or 3 breaths)

200 fly
every stroke or every other

200 IM
every stroke or every other

400 IM
every stroke or every other

orca1946
November 15th, 2011, 12:45 PM
Coming from a distance background, I have learned to breathe on my right side like free. It works for me & keeps my hips down while allowing me to breathe easier.