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Paredes
November 27th, 2011, 01:10 AM
So I'm pretty "swimmers shoulder" is a well known subject, and there's no need for me to explain it. Here's some background information:

Monday the 14th of November I had some right shoulder pain after my 100 yard freestyles swims. My coach was concerned about the pain, and started asking me questions. However I was unable to answer them because I only felt the pain after I finished swimming, and it was already the end of practice.

Tuesday the 15th there was no pain in my right shoulder, but instead my hand was going numb after about 14 100's and hand a tingling feeling. My coach was relieved saying that this is most likely a nerve issue instead of a muscle issue. She suggested I go see a chiropractor.

I haven't swam or workout-ed since then because I had my wisdom teeth removed, but now I want to get in the water but I'm also concerned about my shoulder.

My arm feels as if that tingling feeling can come up at an instant, but maybe thats just mental :D

So basically all I'm asking here is for some advise, and these are the options I have proposed, please feel free to add your own :)

Option 1: Skip Swimming again and go see a chiropractor, and use more money :bitching:

Option 2: Strap workout? There's this swimmer (girl) who's in my PE class who spends her time doing these strap workouts. I know its because of her shoulder because she had some serious injuries earlier in the year. Basically she grasps this tension strap attached to the door and just tugs. I heard this strengthens the muscles in the shoulder that swimming does not to prevent injury. If you know more about this please tell me, because I have the equipment, I just have no idea what to do XD

Option 3: Go to swim practice, and doggy paddle :anim_coffee:
Last season we had this swimmer who had some shoulder problems, and the coach told him to doggy paddle. I have no idea what this does, but I do remember it was because of his shoulders!

geochuck
November 27th, 2011, 08:52 AM
Don't do any thing that causes pain. Don't use any of your three options...

Modify your stroke so you do not feel pain when swimming. I swam several marathon races after fraying the tendons in both shoulders by modifying the stroke. I rolled more, kept the head a little lower. adjusted my kick.

norascats
November 27th, 2011, 09:05 AM
Do a lot of kicking. I injured my shoulder last year and couldn't use my arm for six months.
Keep swimming, even if it is frustrating. Work on your rotation. Work on placing your arms in the water and riding over them. Let the pain and tingling be your guide to what motions to avoid.
Do a lot of kicking.
My shoulder came back slowly. I avoided swimming and missed practices. This is not the way to go! Keep up the schedule to maintain your aerobic fitness.

smontanaro
November 27th, 2011, 10:07 AM
I'm still struggling with tendinitis in my right shoulder (my breathing side). I took off the entire summer and only started swimming again about a month ago. I second geochuck's statement about not doing anything which causes pain. This is not about pushing past your aerobic threshold. The pain in your shoulder is telling you to back off.

This year I've chosen to do some things differently.

Swim on my own instead of with a team. No matter how much you want to adapt, when you're in a lane with several other swimmers and the coach on deck is running a workout for the entire team, I think there is only so much you can do to bend the workout to your needs. In addition, I can swim at the local YMCA pretty much anytime I have the free time, instead of being tied to the schedule of a team.
Change my warm-up routine significantly. In my experience, most team warmups feature something like 200-400 yards swim/kick/pull. That's an awful lot of work to ask a sore shoulder to do while it's cold. My warm-ups now feature a lot of easy drills and kicking, rarely any pulling. I try to make the drills focus more on kicking, things like six kick switch drills or the backstroke equivalents or near equivalents. If my shoulder seems sore, I kick more or do some breaststroke, which doesn't tend to hurt my shoulder nearly as much as free or back.
Don't write down a workout. I've never been good at that anyway, but I think the act of writing down a specific workout tends to make you work through the pain. "Dammit! It says on my sheet that this set is 4x200! I have to complete it!" Of course, the downside is that my workouts tend to be kind of repetitive and boring, but that's a small price to pay for a healthier shoulder.
Kick more, pull less. I used to treat my zoomers as cheaters, and the pull buoy as my friend. Now the pull buoy is often left in my locker or at home, while I use the zoomers without guilt during warm-up or for aerobic sets. Even when swimming, the sets tend to be shortish and feature some drill aspect, not just "how fast can you go?" (a recent favorite is 8x50 golf free, summing the time and number of strokes to get my "golf" score).
Swim shorter workouts more frequently. It's rare that a workout now goes over 2,000 yards, but I'm trying to swim four or five days a week, depending on how my shoulder feels. When swimming with a team, workouts were more like 3,500-4,000 yards, and I could rarely make more than three workouts per week. If I missed a practice, I might only get in two swims during the week.
Learn to love Advil and ice. I never take ibuprofen before practice (not wanting to suppress the pain which signals that I should back off), but have no qualms about taking it afterwards. I also have reusable ice packs at work and home.
Listen to my shoulder. If my shoulder is giving me problems, there's no guilt in skipping a day, cranking up the amount of kicking, or shortening the workout.


I'm sure what I do won't work for everyone, but perhaps you can use some of these ideas to adjust your workouts so you can stay in the water and heal your shoulder.

Skip

swimBRCT
November 27th, 2011, 11:08 AM
Strap workout, AKA resistance bands / stretch cords / rubber tubing... just so if someone else uses different terminology you'll know you're on the same page.

First, think about something for a sec... tense your hand up, as if bracing yourself for a crazy high-five. Feel how just your forearm was engaged.

Then try again- but this time visualize that you're grabbing something. Stick your thumb out to the side. Really kill that stress ball or whatever! You should have felt the little stabilizer shoulder muscles come into action the 2nd time.

Too many swimmers swim along without engaging all the muscles around their rotator cuff. Thinking about grabbing the water, engaging the little stabilizers helps me out a lot.

Short answer about the tubing... you gotta have a plan. Tugging randomly won't have any effect. Copying swim motions doesn't help either because most people have muscle imbalances from just doing 1 rotation motion over and over... usually people train the opposite motions with tubing (ex external rotation). Plan depends on which part of your shoulder hurts, and whether it's tendinitis, impingement or an imbalance.

For more detailed answer, hit up these links.

I'll paste a couple resources for you right below!

http://www.swimmingscience.net/2011/11/swim-coaches-guide-to-shoulder-injury.html

Start the 5 part "stuff every swimmer should know about the shoulder" right here
http://saycoperformance.com/blog/shoulder/the-shoulder-what-every-swim-coachathlete-should-know-%E2%80%93-part-1/

msgrupp
November 27th, 2011, 11:13 AM
If this is a high school or college swimmer--I say see the athletic trainer connected with your teams. Or 2nd choice--see a doctor.

With the kind of yardage you are doing-you could cause some damage that could keep you out of the water for alot longer than a few weeks.

Been there as an adult swimmer putting in too much yardage too often--result---6 shoulder surgeries and possibly a 7th and 8th.

__steve__
November 27th, 2011, 11:20 AM
Modify your stroke so you do not feel pain when swimming. I swam several marathon races after fraying the tendons in both shoulders by modifying the stroke. I rolled more, kept the head a little lower. adjusted my kick.This philosophy worked for me. As my form improved my shoulders felt better, and I became faster.

Paredes
November 27th, 2011, 05:35 PM
I'll paste a couple resources for you right below!

http://www.swimmingscience.net/2011/11/swim-coaches-guide-to-shoulder-injury.html

Start the 5 part "stuff every swimmer should know about the shoulder" right here
http://saycoperformance.com/blog/shoulder/the-shoulder-what-every-swim-coachathlete-should-know-%E2%80%93-part-1/

Thanks for the links! Now I know what to do with tubing! And about those hand motions you mentioned, I didnt feel anything, maybe I'm healed or I did it wrong XD