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sh50
April 24th, 2012, 10:57 AM
If one is not comfortable with bilateral swimming or swimming three strokes but wants to breathe every single stroke on one side and perfect one's rhythmic breathing, it would probably be inhale 1000-1 and exhale 1000-1,1000-2 isn't it? It looks pretty straight but the exhalation does not always come out rhythmically. I went through some of the posts on breathing on this but could not find anything . I know that single stroke breathing would not require the rhythmic breathing skills to the same degree but the idea is to improve as much as possible.

orca1946
April 24th, 2012, 12:29 PM
Do I understand you in saying - take 1 breath on the side for every 2 arm strokes? Breathe in on the right as you carry forward with that hand , exhale under water while the left is pulling thru to come back to the right hand would be how I describe it. Yes , many swimmers do just this.

sh50
April 24th, 2012, 09:00 PM
Thanks for replying. What I was asking was that is Inhale exhale ratio of 10001/1000110002 right for this kind of swimming. If not, what is the right inhalation/exhalation ratio?I just want to be sure.

Fins25
April 24th, 2012, 11:24 PM
Don't over think your breathing too much. Get as much air in as you can and breath it all out as quickly as you can. The only thing I would say about breathing to one side is ensure that you are rotating to both sides. If you find that 1 arm or shoulder is getting more fatigued than the other you need to look that you are rotating to the side you are not breathing to.

sh50
April 25th, 2012, 11:13 AM
I asked somebody in the pool this morning. He said that I must be over inhaling. If true, how much should one inhale?. Normally, the emphasis in swimming is on exhaling. Even for single stroke swimming there has to be some kind of rhythm. Normally, rhythm is discussed when you breathe every three, four strokes which coaches make you go through during bubbling exercises-1001-1005. There must be some rhythm if one wants to breathe after every stroke. Sometimes, I seem to get it right, sometimes I don't which is why I am asking this.

Rob Copeland
April 25th, 2012, 01:53 PM
For me breathing is more of syncopated timing rather than a rhythmic. Inhalation is dictated by arm recovery on your breathing side. And exhalation is dictated by how quickly you can expel air just prior to inhaling. Inhale, hold, exhale, and repeat as needed…

As for over inhaling, this sounds a lot like breathing through your eyelids. Personally I usually can’t get too much air. However, if inhaling is causing a delay in your stroke, then you most likely need a stroke correction not a reduced inhalation.

As for bubbling exercises, they teach you to comfortably exhale underwater turn your head and inhale. However, when you begin to incorporate this into your crawl stroke, the pattern becomes inhale rapidly/forcefully, hold then exhale explosively.

swimslick
April 25th, 2012, 04:47 PM
I don't think I hold my breath at all when breathing every stroke cycle.....if I do it is for a split second as I return my head to a normal position. But pretty much as soon as my face is back in the water I exhale. In other words (I think), inhale 1001/exhale 1001 per stroke cycle. You just need to inhale as much as you need to get to your next breath. I definitely do not take in a full lung if I'm breathing every stroke cycle. You might be holding your breath for too long or not be exhaling fast enough if you are finding that you are not 'ready' for your next breath when it comes around....is that your problem? Seems you need to inhale less or exhale faster?

sh50
April 27th, 2012, 11:55 AM
I think I inhale more sometimes. Where exhaling is concerned, I exhale slow through the nose and when I am turning, I start exhaling from the mouth so that there is enough momentum for the final spurt out just before inhaling. Thanks for the 1001/1001 ratio. I wanted to confirm that.

I read in a couple of websites that when the arm just touches the water ahead, one should turn to breathe on the opposite side. What role would the recovering arm have in all this?. Will it not turn a bit along with the body(while breathng)and then go out of the water slightly later than the catching arm touching the water on the opposite side just before one begins to turn breathe. I have not understood the connection between the recovering arm and breathing if there is any in this single stroke breathing

__steve__
April 27th, 2012, 06:13 PM
I've made it a practice to hum out air immediately after inhaling, but also at a rate according to the following breath to maintain buoyancy. The point to constantly bleed air was suggested at a clinic and has something to do with physical properties of rising CO2 concentrations, pressure, and accurate levels sensed by the body. I try to leave some air in prior to inhaling. It also keeps rhythm and control

sh50
April 27th, 2012, 08:18 PM
Humming and exhaling at even pace is fine but one has to exhale all air completely from a majority of what I have read. I think that applies to all kinds of swimming-single or multiple.

vo2
April 28th, 2012, 07:59 AM
If one is not comfortable with bilateral swimming or swimming three strokes but wants to breathe every single stroke on one side and perfect one's rhythmic breathing, it would probably be inhale 1000-1 and exhale 1000-1,1000-2 isn't it? It looks pretty straight but the exhalation does not always come out rhythmically. I went through some of the posts on breathing on this but could not find anything . I know that single stroke breathing would not require the rhythmic breathing skills to the same degree but the idea is to improve as much as possible.

Are you exhaling underwater or holding your breath? There is a wiiiiiiiiiiide chasm b/t the amount of O2 you can use, CO2 build up and amount you can take in depending on what you do with you head in the water. This goes hand in hand with you rhythm. When some folks get hypoxic they start to rush things and as you know it's all about rhythm and timing.

Think about it like this. If you were a runner, cyclist or any other kind of aerobic based athlete would you be doing your workouts while holding your breath? Racing while holding your breath? You may very well not be holding your breath, but I wanted to point out an analogy anyway.

Fins25
April 29th, 2012, 02:15 AM
I read in a couple of websites that when the arm just touches the water ahead, one should turn to breathe on the opposite side. What role would the recovering arm have in all this?. Will it not turn a bit along with the body(while breathng)and then go out of the water slightly later than the catching arm touching the water on the opposite side just before one begins to turn breathe. I have not understood the connection between the recovering arm and breathing if there is any in this single stroke breathing


What you are saying is fairly accurate. You need to breathe when the as the opposite hand enters the water. In terms of the recover arm and you taking too long to breathe, I think you need to focus on getting your face back in the water as you hand gets to you head. If your hand is going past your face while you are still breathing in then you are likely taking too long.

Again, don't over think it too much just try to make the whole thing as smooth as possible without any pauses in the stroke.