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gelooc
June 14th, 2012, 09:28 AM
Hello everyone! :) Im new here , and I would like to help me in something here!

Well, I was playing football from the age of 7 and im 18 now! I was very good and I had an invitation to an other country! But I didn't went because of my injury! I stopped footbal cause of that! They said me to start swimming because I have a nice body and a good heart! (Thank god :D). Never mind, I started swimming everything is good! I love that sport! But I still play football but not in a team! With some other team with bet and in 5x5 - 7x7 - 8x8 championships! What's my question now? I want to start martial arts but not stopping swimming! Im doing 3 times a week swimming in about 50 minutes each practise! Can I make them both without any injures or problems?

Thanks in advance! :)

gdanner
June 14th, 2012, 10:11 AM
Injuries go hand-in-hand with many martial art forms, so it depends on the style. Stay away from BJJ, Muay Thai, and other full contact sparring martial arts and you could be fine. What form were you planning on practicing? If you're just hitting pads and shadowboxing, it could be great cardio.

ande
June 14th, 2012, 12:09 PM
Hello everyone! :) Im new here , and I would like to help me in something here!
Well, I was playing football from the age of 7 and im 18 now! I was very good and I had an invitation to an other country! But I didn't went because of my injury! I stopped footbal cause of that! They said me to start swimming because I have a nice body and a good heart! (Thank god :D). Never mind, I started swimming everything is good! I love that sport! But I still play football but not in a team! With some other team with bet and in 5x5 - 7x7 - 8x8 championships! What's my question now? I want to start martial arts but not stopping swimming! Im doing 3 times a week swimming in about 50 minutes each practise! Can I make them both without any injures or problems? Thanks in advance! :)

You can choose to do both.

You're not swimming much. Just 3x per week. Swimming injuries tend to be repetitive use type stuff and sometimes aches, strains, and pulls. Sometimes fatigue, expecially when you increase yardage, intensity or frequency.

Martial arts are likely to cause many more injuries. Read the waiver your do jo, academy or training center requires you to sign.
here's one I pulled off the web:


the martial arts techniques which I learn at the Academy are capable of causing minor or serious physical injury (including abrasions, bruises, bleeding, broken bones or cartilage, or other tissue or organ damage), emotional or psychological injury, death, or property damage, whenever I use them against another person or physical objects, either in class at the Academy or elsewhere.

All that stuff can happen and there's no way to guarantee that it won't.

steph2kids
June 17th, 2012, 09:47 AM
My son stills does taekwondo, even though I'm sure his coach would prefer he didn't and come to practice on those days. :blush: It has done nothing but good and has filled in some of the things lacking in his swimming experience, like strength training and real every day lessons in sportsmanship. (Absolutely no trash taking, envious actions, everyone helps each other and moves together through the ranks...not like an individual race. Think Buddhist.)

If you do this and you want to keep swimming, pick a martial art that is strict about safety. Also, look at the school. Don't pick a place that advances people through the belts quickly, because in my experience that means they want your money (you pay for tests) and are less concerned with safety. Taekwondo is an Olympic sport with strict rules and regulations. It is a defensive martial art, so not just attacking, it has strict sparring rules and padding and other safety equipment... Or will, if it's a good school. If someone gets hurt, then someone screwed up and it's embarrassing, so the kids try not to let it happen as they move up the ranks. Sparring is about points in TKD, not beating someone to the ground, so you are less likely to get injured. You can also concentrate more on just forms and even compete only in that side of the sport.

Fins25
June 17th, 2012, 06:31 PM
You can absolutely do both but I don't think there is anyone that can say you won't get injuries. Our bodies just sometimes like to break down when we push them. Good luck with it. :)

selkie
June 17th, 2012, 10:19 PM
I took an adult beginner taekwondo class a few years ago and had a lot of fun (and no injuries) at it. The one thing that drove me nuts though was that I've got a classic longtime swimmer's floppy ankles, and I felt like I really had to concentrate harder than a non-fish would in order to keep my ankles in an L shape to do the kicks properly. My toes kept wanting to just go to a 'natural' pointed position on me.

chaos
June 17th, 2012, 10:48 PM
Approach swimming as a martial artist would... strive for perfection.

west1
July 16th, 2012, 07:15 PM
I tried to do both in college (TKD) and lasted about 4 weeks. the exhaustion was ridiculous. swimming just takes too much out of you so i gave up the TKD to focus on swimming. but if you're not swimming full time, it should be a problem.

MickYoung
July 17th, 2012, 12:34 PM
If you do this and you want to keep swimming, pick a martial art that is strict about safety.


I wholehearted agree.

Two defense issues.

1) The best thinkg any martial can do is to give you a heightened awareness of the intentions of peopel you see. The best defense is knowing when you can avoid trouble just by crossing teh street or going around the block.

2) As an ex-boxer, I'm aware that the striking arts are much more likely to raise violence levels and lead to injury than the wrestling arts, which tend to pacify. (not the you can't get seriously hurt in the clinches, but...)

mino
July 18th, 2012, 08:18 PM
Good for you buddy, your a champ. More athleticism is never a bad thing. What kind of martial arts were you thinking about?

Fresnoid
July 18th, 2012, 10:38 PM
I've participated in a variety of martial arts. I'm not a Black Belt, but both my daughters are and I help manage the dojo where they train (long story involving the early death of a revered sensei)

A couple quick observations

1) The Jiu Jitsu guys are the ones who are always getting injured
2) I have chronic should problems from swimming. The boxing part of Muay Thai (working out punching the heavy bag hard) makes my shoulders feel better.

orca1946
July 21st, 2012, 05:39 PM
Do both as your body will tell you if you over do it :cane:quickly !!

Nickel
July 22nd, 2012, 11:38 AM
I think the more diverse your athletic training is the better off you are. As many have said, you can tell if you are overdoing it and when that happens you need to take a break. Remember, you want to do this for a long time so taking a couPle of weeks off isn't much in the big picture.
Stretch, stretch, stretch is going to be key as well.
Also, be picky about which martial art you do. Hard verse soft, linear verse circular etc.
Good luck