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rosa.michelle
June 21st, 2012, 06:05 AM
Many of us start packed with a lot of enthusiasm but end distracted on the way. We donít feel as passionate towards achieving our set targets. We have to push and drag ourselves to work further, and no longer enjoy it the way we used to.

Have you ever experienced a similar situation? Any suggestions to overcome this?

gdanner
June 21st, 2012, 09:03 AM
Many of us start packed with a lot of enthusiasm but end distracted on the way. We donít feel as passionate towards achieving our set targets. We have to push and drag ourselves to work further, and no longer enjoy it the way we used to.

Have you ever experienced a similar situation? Any suggestions to overcome this?

Of course! If you're like me, you've been swimming for a long time and a lot of the meets seem to blend together.

1. Sign up for a meet, whether you're in shape or not. Assuming you're at least somewhat competitive, you'll make yourself practice so you put yourself in a position to perform well.

2. Sign up for an event you haven't done. I didn't participate in Open Water until last year and I had a blast!

3. Sign up for events you haven't done. If you haven't done the 100 breast in ten years, try it out. Maybe you'll surprise yourself and get a best time!

That's all I have for now :)

pwb
June 21st, 2012, 09:20 AM
Of course! If you're like me, you've been swimming for a long time and a lot of the meets seem to blend together.

1. Sign up for a meet, whether you're in shape or not. Assuming you're at least somewhat competitive, you'll make yourself practice so you put yourself in a position to perform well.

2. Sign up for an event you haven't done. I didn't participate in Open Water until last year and I had a blast!

3. Sign up for events you haven't done. If you haven't done the 100 breast in ten years, try it out. Maybe you'll surprise yourself and get a best time!

That's all I have for now :)Greg said my top 3 ideas, but I'd also add some variants on #3:


Try to do the "check-off" challenge one year where you make sure you race every event at least once in a season.
Play around with different events in different seasons: I'm a mid-distance to distance swimmer, but pretended to be a sprinter for one season. It was both fun and rejuvenating.

ande
June 21st, 2012, 12:42 PM
Many of us start packed with a lot of enthusiasm but end distracted on the way. We don’t feel as passionate towards achieving our set targets. We have to push and drag ourselves to work further, and no longer enjoy it the way we used to.
Have you ever experienced a similar situation? Any suggestions to overcome this?

This happens all the time. I've written about it and more in swim faster faster.

Most people begin projects with a lot of enthusiasm and determination, they are all gung ho, but overtime some people notice their enthusiasm decreases. They might encounter set backs, experience injuries, not meet expectations and get disappointed, feel like they are wasting their time, or just feel burned out. Sometimes their efforts decrease, they start skipping practice or not pushing as hard or just going through the motions.

This falls in the category of mental stuff. Goals, Plans, Self talk, Motivation, Decisions / choices, habits, support from yourself and others.

It pretty much boils down to:

What do you want to accomplish?
(your goal)

Why do you want to do it?
(your reasons: what you'll gain if you do and lose if you don't)

How are you going to do it?

What you say to yourself and how you say it?
(self talk)

Your perceptions.
Where are you now and what do you hope to accomplish?
We do best when there's hope. When we feel it's possible to reach our goals. Unrealistic expectations can cause feelings of hopelessness and doubt.

Who's around you?
Birds of a feather do flock together.
Are you around dreamers and doers?
Are you an eagle or a turkey?

My suggestion is Tip 41 Get Truly Inspired

We are at our best when we passionately pursue something. We need a mission. We thrive with challenges. Our finest moments are often in the midst of trouble and struggle, yet we remain determined to overcome.

ALSO, it's OK to change your mind or take a break or adjust your efforts to a more sustainable pace. You can change.

What do you want to accomplish?
Why do you want it?
Get started

What are you saying to yourself? How are you saying it?

Ande

steph2kids
June 21st, 2012, 03:31 PM
I find I lose my motivation if I change my own goals to someone else's, or start comparing my goals to someone else's.

If I keep my own goals and swim for me, I'm a beast. :D

I just have to maybe take one day off (to regret not being in the pool :badday:), then go back and just focus on what *I* want to do. Then my motivation returns with a vengeance.

wwoelbel
June 21st, 2012, 03:34 PM
Let me start by letting you know that I have only been with Masters Swimming for a very short time so my view point may not really apply but...

For me, Masters Swimming with a club is providing the motivation that was starting to drift from my fitness program. I get challenged by the coach to do things that I never would have done on my own. That guy in the next lane over that always beats my by 1/2 body length.... Im even going to a meet in July - even though I had decided that I didnt need to be competitive. I think the people in the club are key. Part of my motivation to get out of bed and hit the pool is the people that I swim with.

My ultimate motivation is that without regular exercise I'll die before I should. Swimming is the only "sport" that I enjoy.

Bill Sive
June 21st, 2012, 09:28 PM
You must be your best motivator. I do, personally, not encourage you to rely on others to motivate you.

I have been informed by certain swimming associates that "If you didn't have such a crappy stroke", or "That was not good enough" etc., etc., etc. Don't tell me they are trying to coach me, or some other nonsense, they are not. Trust me on this.

If I listened to them I would not be swimming today. I met a very respectable swim coach by accident last year. He told me "you have a backstroke, you need to cultivate it a little, keep working on it you'll improve".

I know a few UnAttached Master Swimmers, who are phenomenal. They are motivated, dedicated, and put in as much work as if they were on a team. Plus they set records.

You can do it.

rosa.michelle
June 22nd, 2012, 03:54 AM
Of course! If you're like me, you've been swimming for a long time and a lot of the meets seem to blend together.

1. Sign up for a meet, whether you're in shape or not. Assuming you're at least somewhat competitive, you'll make yourself practice so you put yourself in a position to perform well.

2. Sign up for an event you haven't done. I didn't participate in Open Water until last year and I had a blast!

3. Sign up for events you haven't done. If you haven't done the 100 breast in ten years, try it out. Maybe you'll surprise yourself and get a best time!

That's all I have for now :)

Thanks for such a hearty response!
I have been swimming for long, true, but off and on I feel so sluggish that I leave it altogether..start all over.. leave it again.. start again..

Signing up for an event seems really great, and I think that would work well for me.
Thanks!

rosa.michelle
June 22nd, 2012, 04:10 AM
Greg said my top 3 ideas, but I'd also add some variants on #3:


Try to do the "check-off" challenge one year where you make sure you race every event at least once in a season.
Play around with different events in different seasons: I'm a mid-distance to distance swimmer, but pretended to be a sprinter for one season. It was both fun and rejuvenating.


The first one wont work for me, I am just too lazy at times
However I will be glad to try the second option :)

rosa.michelle
June 22nd, 2012, 04:15 AM
This happens all the time. I've written about it and more in swim faster faster (http://www.usms.org/forums/showpost.php?p=265004&postcount=1794).

Most people begin projects with a lot of enthusiasm and determination, they are all gung ho, but overtime some people notice their enthusiasm decreases. They might encounter set backs, experience injuries, not meet expectations and get disappointed, feel like they are wasting their time, or just feel burned out. Sometimes their efforts decrease, they start skipping practice or not pushing as hard or just going through the motions.

This falls in the category of mental stuff. Goals, Plans, Self talk, Motivation, Decisions / choices, habits, support from yourself and others.

It pretty much boils down to:

What do you want to accomplish?
(your goal)

Why do you want to do it?
(your reasons: what you'll gain if you do and lose if you don't)

How are you going to do it?

What you say to yourself and how you say it?
(self talk)

Your perceptions.
Where are you now and what do you hope to accomplish?
We do best when there's hope. When we feel it's possible to reach our goals. Unrealistic expectations can cause feelings of hopelessness and doubt.

Who's around you?
Birds of a feather do flock together.
Are you around dreamers and doers?
Are you an eagle or a turkey?

My suggestion is Tip 41 Get Truly Inspired (http://www.usms.org/forums/showpost.php?p=35157&postcount=140)

We are at our best when we passionately pursue something. We need a mission. We thrive with challenges. Our finest moments are often in the midst of trouble and struggle, yet we remain determined to overcome.

ALSO, it's OK to change your mind or take a break or adjust your efforts to a more sustainable pace. You can change.

What do you want to accomplish?
Why do you want it?
Get started

What are you saying to yourself? How are you saying it?

Ande

Thanks Ande, I am just going to read your writing :) I hope that will make me all set to go!

rosa.michelle
June 22nd, 2012, 04:29 AM
I find I lose my motivation if I change my own goals to someone else's, or start comparing my goals to someone else's.

If I keep my own goals and swim for me, I'm a beast. :D

I just have to maybe take one day off (to regret not being in the pool :badday:), then go back and just focus on what *I* want to do. Then my motivation returns with a vengeance.

:)
I dont suffer from the same problem.
I wont blame it for the cause of my hopeless situation!

rosa.michelle
June 22nd, 2012, 04:33 AM
Let me start by letting you know that I have only been with Masters Swimming for a very short time so my view point may not really apply but...

For me, Masters Swimming with a club is providing the motivation that was starting to drift from my fitness program. I get challenged by the coach to do things that I never would have done on my own. That guy in the next lane over that always beats my by 1/2 body length.... Im even going to a meet in July - even though I had decided that I didnt need to be competitive. I think the people in the club are key. Part of my motivation to get out of bed and hit the pool is the people that I swim with.

My ultimate motivation is that without regular exercise I'll die before I should. Swimming is the only "sport" that I enjoy.

I tried it some time ago, and a friend really pushed me into a fitness program, but once there, I drifted quite soon!

rosa.michelle
June 22nd, 2012, 04:39 AM
You must be your best motivator. I do, personally, not encourage you to rely on others to motivate you.

I have been informed by certain swimming associates that "If you didn't have such a crappy stroke", or "That was not good enough" etc., etc., etc. Don't tell me they are trying to coach me, or some other nonsense, they are not. Trust me on this.

If I listened to them I would not be swimming today. I met a very respectable swim coach by accident last year. He told me "you have a backstroke, you need to cultivate it a little, keep working on it you'll improve".

I know a few UnAttached Master Swimmers, who are phenomenal. They are motivated, dedicated, and put in as much work as if they were on a team. Plus they set records.

You can do it.

But Bill :afraid: I fail to motivate myself
Once I am off the track, I just cant put myself together again and dont try anymore!