PDA

View Full Version : back from five year hiatus



sailorstroke
June 25th, 2012, 06:21 PM
Hey, I am looking for a little "aquatic-guidance".

I last swam a masters program at 19. I am turning 24 this summer, and today was the first time I had jumped back into the pool since 19. Needless to say, I lasted about 500m of kick and then hit the shower.

My technique is a little off, but for the most part still holds well. I am obviously very out of shape, and will be needing to hit the pool a lot over the next few months; ready and willing though!

For a Breaster/Free guy, what sort of sets, drills, work-outs might you suggest? Especially geared towards the long hiatus!

J.

thrasher
June 25th, 2012, 07:43 PM
Hey, I am looking for a little "aquatic-guidance".

I last swam a masters program at 19. I am turning 24 this summer, and today was the first time I had jumped back into the pool since 19. Needless to say, I lasted about 500m of kick and then hit the shower.

My technique is a little off, but for the most part still holds well. I am obviously very out of shape, and will be needing to hit the pool a lot over the next few months; ready and willing though!

For a Breaster/Free guy, what sort of sets, drills, work-outs might you suggest? Especially geared towards the long hiatus!

J.

First off, you are going to want to take things slow. Don't up your yardage too quickly or you increase the risk on injury.

Listen to your body. If something hurts, back off a bit. If you feel good, push it a little bit more.

And don't expect to be swimming record breaking times a month or two from now. It's going to take a while to get into the swing of things, so enjoy the journey; it's what Masters Swimming is all about.:applaud:

Swimosaur
June 26th, 2012, 02:49 PM
... what sort of sets, drills, work-outs might you suggest? Especially geared towards the long hiatus!

Having come back from a 33 year long hiatus, and now finishing my fourth year in the water ... What worked for me, instead of specific sets, was having a series of mini-goals I could work towards, each of which took a few weeks or months to accomplish. The mini-goals were fun, kept me moving forwards, and kept me in the water.

For the first bit, when I was really out of shape, my goal was to be able to swim a 1650 without stopping, nevermind the time. That turned out to be a pretty good choice, because I developed some level of conditioning. That took about 10 weeks. I didn't use a clock at all.

About that time my wife spied an article about Senior Olympics in the local paper, shoved it at me, and said, "You should be doing this, old man!" So my next goal was to enter a little local Senior Olympics meet. I decided I didn't want to swim all freestyle, so I started swimming backstroke as well, and had to teach myself the new-fangled turn all you young whippersnappers use these days.

After that ... state senior olympics, first USMS meet, first 200 IM, first 400 IM, first 1650, first USMS short course nationals, first long course nationals, first 200 fly in competition, first senior games nationals, and just this spring, first 500 done all fly. There were a bunch of others.

The point is, pick a fairly near-term athletic goal you'd like to accomplish, and the workouts will write themselves. Nothing outrageous! Make the goals fun, have fun doing it, and stay in the water!

ElaineK
June 26th, 2012, 04:11 PM
Having come back from a 33 year long hiatus, and now finishing my fourth year in the water ... What worked for me, instead of specific sets, was having a series of mini-goals I could work towards, each of which took a few weeks or months to accomplish. The mini-goals were fun, kept me moving forwards, and kept me in the water.

For the first bit, when I was really out of shape, my goal was to be able to swim a 1650 without stopping, nevermind the time. That turned out to be a pretty good choice, because I developed some level of conditioning. That took about 10 weeks. I didn't use a clock at all.

About that time my wife spied an article about Senior Olympics in the local paper, shoved it at me, and said, "You should be doing this, old man!" So my next goal was to enter a little local Senior Olympics meet. I decided I didn't want to swim all freestyle, so I started swimming backstroke as well, and had to teach myself the new-fangled turn all you young whippersnappers use these days.

After that ... state senior olympics, first USMS meet, first 200 IM, first 400 IM, first 1650, first USMS short course nationals, first long course nationals, first 200 fly in competition, first senior games nationals, and just this spring, first 500 done all fly. There were a bunch of others.

The point is, pick a fairly near-term athletic goal you'd like to accomplish, and the workouts will write themselves. Nothing outrageous! Make the goals fun, have fun doing it, and stay in the water!

We are SO much on the same page, Swimosaur! I remember thinking the same thing when we set our goals for 2012; ours were very similar, including Geezer Games.

I am approaching my swimming the same way as you and truly believe it is what keeps me motivated and enthusiastic for the water. No matter how lousy my sleep was the night before (and, it's lousy quite often...), I can't wait to get into the pool the following day. The reason? I set realistic goals that I was excited about attempting to accomplish. And, I continue to add more to the list.

By the way, always write your goals in pencil- and leave room at the bottom of the page for more. Nowhere in my list was it my goal to win the 2012 Georgia Championship Series for my age group or swim a 2,000 (or 900) yard continuous butterfly. But, I am in the lead to achieve that first added goal (I could clinch it at the Georgia Games Open Water Swim, on July 14) and I just accomplished the second one on Sunday (I had only hoped to make it to 1,000 yards, but what the heck?). I also had NO goal to swim 400 IM or 200 fly- ever- but, now I can't wait to give it a try, since I now know I can swim a non-stop 200 (2,000!) fly. Even though my time may be slow :cane:, I still want to do it!

TMNELSON01
June 26th, 2012, 07:05 PM
I came back as well this year, and found a group and have been swimming with them for a year. The problem has been that this group only swims freestyle. Looking at the boards, it seems all other masters groups swim all 4 strokes. I am moving this summer and I am very afraid to join a new masters group. I haven't done a different stroke in over 20 years and I'm not sure I can make it 25 yards in anything but freestyle! I truly want to join a masters group for fitness and work towards competing, but am really afraid to!

That Guy
June 26th, 2012, 07:09 PM
I came back as well this year, and found a group and have been swimming with them for a year. The problem has been that this group only swims freestyle. Looking at the boards, it seems all other masters groups swim all 4 strokes. I am moving this summer and I am very afraid to join a new masters group. I haven't done a different stroke in over 20 years and I'm not sure I can make it 25 yards in anything but freestyle! I truly want to join a masters group for fitness and work towards competing, but am really afraid to!
you can swim other strokes with your current group, but you will probably have to swim on slower intervals as a result.

sailorstroke
June 28th, 2012, 01:27 AM
Well, today was my third day in the water straight. I even gathered the courage to wear my phelps dragsuit; hairy legs and all. I suppose I would like to see myself under 36seconds for 50free as a first goal... although, my turns will need some improving.

Thanks for the input.

MickYoung
June 28th, 2012, 11:16 AM
Well, today was my third day in the water straight.



My experience when I'm out of shape (which happens a lot) is that I improve the most if I ahve a rest day after every workout day.

I start out at about 1000 yards a workout. If I workout days in a row, increasing by 100 yards each day is hard, hard, hard. If I workout every other day, then 300 to 500 yards (or more) increase per workout is pretty easy.

But then, I'm more than twice your age, so YMMV considerably.