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quicksilver
July 5th, 2012, 11:48 AM
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/04/delineating-the-perfect-swim-stroke/


The better choice for human propulsion, he says, was the paddlelike deep-catch stroke, which actually produced more lift than sculling, along with a hefty dose of drag.
“All things being equal, our data show that the deep-catch stroke is far more effective,” Dr. Mittal says.

Kevinj
July 5th, 2012, 12:05 PM
Cool Article, thanks for posting that.

GJohnMullen
July 6th, 2012, 07:37 AM
It is great to see research on the sport we love and we all know we need a lot more research! This article looked at the video of a few elite swimmers to drive their conclusions.

A lot of variables constitute a perfect stroke for the individual. More importantly, the distance of the race, as physiological fatigue is believed to increase at a greater rate with a stroke resulting in higher force.

Exert from July Swimming Science Research Review on the article:
"This study suggests in freestyle and backstroke lift plays an integral part in propulsion, supporting the 'lift-based' theory. The findings in the study bring to light the importance of a straight line catch, to maximize force production. However, this limited study only analyzed a few swimmers, without indicating the event analyzed, questioning the validity of this study across all swimmers and distances (Mullen 2012)."

clyde hedlund
July 7th, 2012, 03:07 PM
It's OK to drop elbows again...Hooray! And no more EVF for me. I love this article. Thank you very much.

Why Not
July 7th, 2012, 05:00 PM
How can they have performed research on nowadays topswimmers if only very few don`t swim with high elbows. I only can come up with Bernard from france.

clyde hedlund
July 8th, 2012, 04:51 PM
How can they have performed research on nowadays topswimmers if only very few don`t swim with high elbows. I only can come up with Bernard from france.

An excellent point! So, back up goes my elbows and EVF.:chug:

dchiatt
July 8th, 2012, 06:24 PM
the article compares all sculling vs all paddle. I think many swimmers use a hybrid- that is scull into catch, then after EVF use the paddle to push the "fat" water.

Kevin in MD
July 8th, 2012, 09:20 PM
Exert from July Swimming Science Research Review on the article:
"This study suggests in freestyle and backstroke lift plays an integral part in propulsion, supporting the 'lift-based' theory. The findings in the study bring to light the importance of a straight line catch, to maximize force production. However, this limited study only analyzed a few swimmers, without indicating the event analyzed, questioning the validity of this study across all swimmers and distances (Mullen 2012)."

It's nice that the New York Times included a link to the original article but there are lots of questions in it.

First of all it isn't clear to me in the article that the thrust number they give is thrust in the direction of travel of the center of gravity of the swimmer.

Second, the thrust numbers for the sculling swimmers were lower but in one case the swimmers were the same speed, so the sculling swimmer had lower thrust but the same speed in the other case te sculling swimmer was MUCH faster.

Third, the introduction says that the movements of several swimmers were analyzed but the data table only shows one speed, one thrust etc, what happened to the data from the other swimmers.

Fourth, the swim speeds of the freestyle examples were VASTLY different, 1.2 vs 1.8 meters per second, 50% difference in speeds. For this application I don't think those are valid examples.

Fifth, was the thrust number average? peak? average for the length of the pull? Were the pulls different lengths?


There are so many questions there, I don't think anything can be made of the study one way or the other.

__steve__
July 8th, 2012, 10:17 PM
So, if one elects to use more of a straight arm pull they better be doing sprinting events, and capable of snatching close to their body weight?

havepoolwillswim
July 11th, 2012, 10:00 AM
They should have spoken with us first before they conducted this study :)

I think which event analyzed is critical.

I'd like to see an analysis of Sun Yang's stroke vs a few of the world's fastest 50 meter sprinters. Or compare Yang's stroke at different times during his 1500 at last year's Worlds - from above and below water say at the 800 meter mark and then later at the 1490 meter mark.

I just thought of the change in Nathan Adrian's stroke during a 100 free -at 30 meters vs his last 5 meters.