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TetheredSwimmer
December 19th, 2003, 01:10 PM
This is my first time to this site; it's excellent! I wish I had more time to really surf it.

I'm a recreational swimmer in my late 30's. I swim two mornings during the week, and on either Saturday or Sunday. Due to my work schedule, and the fact that I swim in the morning, I can only allot approx. 30 minutes. So what I've been doing is swimming a mile of free non-stop, usually finishing up with a sprint for the last 80 (it's a small college pool, 20 yards). I want to change up my workout, but there's no Masters group or adult swim group locally, and I don't have the drive to actually GO somewhere that has them (the pool is walking distance from my house).

My questions are:
1. I do a VERY poor butterfly, but I don't know how to correct it without getting some coaching. How does one get coached in swimming (or improve his stroke by reading "how-to' articles) if there aren't any local groups that cater to adults (that I know of--I live in Frederick, MD if anyone knows of someone), and I can't see what my stroke looks like.

2. Is there a recommended 30 minute "fitness" swim workout that you could direct me to? Periodically, on Saturdays, I'll swim about 2500 by 400's, then 300's, etc., each of free, breast, back and free again (where it WOULD be fly).

3. What's the deal with fins and hand paddles? When are these used?

Any help you can give would be appreciated. Until then, it's "TS" for me! (Simpsons reference)

cinc3100
December 20th, 2003, 11:55 PM
Well, don't worry so much about fly since to do a pretty good fly you usually have to have fair conditioning. I swam for about 3 years less yardage than yourself and when I started working out more yardage I improved the fly. There are books that deal with strokes like the Total Immersion and others. Also, for a lap swimmer who has a short time to workout -probably doing free the most and than some back and breast is helpful and maybe a couple of laps of fly. If you are not swimming in meets its ok to swim on your own in a small pool. I swim in a health club pool twice a week that's only 15 yards and is shallow where I avoid flip turns. I also swim in a 25 yard rec pool which is a little deeper and I'm able to do dives and flip turns there. But working out on your own you don't have to worry about becoming real good at butterfly.

cinc3100
December 21st, 2003, 12:06 AM
As for fins, its up to you. Their useful in free and back and fly but usually not breaststroke. It will make you swim faster and you will be able to do more yardage. Hand paddles, I would recommend the small ones and doing then no more than twice a week. Also, if the pool provides a kickboard, you can do that or kick without one. You might start out with freestyle warmups from 200 to 400 yards. Follow by 10 x50's of freesyle, breast and back and one of butterfly between 20 to 30 seconds and maybe sprint a couple. Then maybe another 200 yard freestyle. Then maybe 5x 100 of free or breast or back resting between 15 to 30 seconds. Then a 200 yard kick and maybe a 200 yard pull with or without paddles if you have a pull buoy. Then swim freesyle for 300 yards. Then 5x 50 of breast or backstroke,resting 20 seconds or 30 seconds. Then cool down 200 yard freestyle.

laineybug
December 21st, 2003, 10:28 AM
I have the same problem as you... no adult group close enough for me to join. I started out swimming (and reading) on my own and made fair progress. One evening while I was swimming my laps I noticed a guard giving lessons to two women who could not swim... literally, all they could/would do was stand in the water. I watched this guard over the next month bring the women from standing in the water, to swimming one lap of free, and within a couple of months they were swimming multiple laps, were able to do breast and back as well as free, and dive from the block. Thats when I decided to ask her if she might be interested in giving me some pointers. After talking to her about it I found out she had been a comptitive swimmer and later coached. We made arrangements for one hour every other week (private lessons can get pricey) When she started training me I made huge gains and during one five week period I was able to double my yardage. So thats my advice, look for a guard or coach who is willing to work with you on a one to one basis. Ask that they also develop workouts for you to do between lessons that include the drills/skills they want you to work on... might be a little bit extra, but well worth it because it will be tailored to your needs and time restrictions.

Lainey

wetwolfe
January 21st, 2004, 09:36 PM
I grew up a swimmer, from age 5 to 22. After years off, I recently began swimming again for personal fitness and emotional state of mind.

Once I got back into fairly decent shape, I found this website and poured through the workouts offered in the training forum.

I have followed these workouts for some time now, and have improved considerably and quickly. While I wasn't always the most enthused when it came to drill sets, pull sets and kick sets, they really have helped with my stroke and conditioning. I'm still not crazy about them, but recognize their importance, and value their results.

I have also developed a fairly inexpensive method for using the workouts available on this site. I cut and paste the text from the workout into Microsoft Word, and format them to the size of a business card (front and back). I print them (yellow paper for freestyle workouts, green for IM's), cut them down to size, and take them to Office Depot to have them laminated. This way, I can keep them by the pool for reference, and have a number to choose from every workout.

jean sterling
January 22nd, 2004, 09:28 PM
Originally posted by wetwolfe
I have also developed a fairly inexpensive method for using the workouts available on this site. I cut and paste the text from the workout into Microsoft Word, and format them to the size of a business card (front and back). I print them (yellow paper for freestyle workouts, green for IM's), cut them down to size, and take them to Office Depot to have them laminated.

I paste the text into a word document, then do a "select all" and choose a really big font, like 24. This is so I can read the workout at the pool without glasses. I then print out the workout and put it in a baggie.

OneHeartBeat
February 24th, 2004, 07:31 PM
[[QUOTE]]How does one get coached in swimming (or improve his stroke by reading "how-to' articles) if there aren't any local groups that cater to adults (that I know of--I live in Frederick, MD if anyone knows of someone), and I can't see what my stroke looks like.

There are at least two USS clubs in Frederick.

Frederick Area Swim Team
Coached by Cheryl Linscott
(313) 695-0783
fastcoach@aol.com

and

Monocacy Aquatic Club
Choached by Chris Gibeau
(313) 748-0916
edibeau@hatmail.com

I'm not sure if they work with masters age swimmers. But i'm sure they could point you in the right direction.

Hope that helps.

OneHeartBeat