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ALM
April 24th, 2013, 04:25 PM
Article:

Chronic Exercise Preserves Lean Muscle Mass in Masters Athletes
https://physsportsmed.org/sites/default/files/rpsm.2011.09.1933_secure.pdf

The photos are what is really interesting in this paper:

40-year-old triathlete (quadriceps, cross-sectional MRI view)
http://forums.usms.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=7447&d=1366834949

70-year-old sedentary man (quadriceps, cross-sectional MRI view)
http://forums.usms.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=7448&d=1366834960

74-year-old triathlete (quadriceps, cross-sectional MRI view)
http://forums.usms.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=7449&d=1366834969

ALM
April 24th, 2013, 04:43 PM
Another interesting article:


Baby Boomers Sicker Than Parents’ Generation, Study Finds
By Nicole Ostrow - Feb 5, 2013 12:00 AM ET
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-04/baby-boomers-sicker-than-parents-generation-study-finds.html


"...The study, among the first to compare the generations, shows that baby boomers aren’t as healthy and active as most would believe, said Dana E. King, the lead author. They become sicker earlier in life than the previous generation, are more limited in what they can do at work and are more likely to need the use of a cane or walker, the research found..."

fdtotten
April 24th, 2013, 05:31 PM
Thanks for starting this thread, posting the photos, and the direct link to the study. The "Chronic Exercise Preserves Lean Muscle Mass in Masters Athletes" is a well implemented and carefully managed study conducted by well qualified professionals and published in a very authoritative source. I enjoyed reading through the study and will print it out to review again several times. While the conclusion is about muscle mass retention through lifestyle changes, hopefully more studies will be conducted to establish what I would speculate are numerous other positive wellness benefits from "chronic exercise" regarding bone density, immune system, nervous system, digestive, etc.

aqueoushumor
April 24th, 2013, 08:18 PM
Article:

Chronic Exercise Preserves Lean Muscle Mass in Masters Athletes
https://physsportsmed.org/sites/default/files/rpsm.2011.09.1933_secure.pdf

The photos are what is really interesting in this paper:

40-year-old triathlete (quadriceps, cross-sectional MRI view)
http://forums.usms.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=7447&d=1366834949

70-year-old sedentary man (quadriceps, cross-sectional MRI view)
http://forums.usms.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=7448&d=1366834960

74-year-old triathlete (quadriceps, cross-sectional MRI view)
http://forums.usms.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=7449&d=1366834969

These pictures are waaay cool. There are so many people who need to see things like this. Very frustrating to walk around WalMart!

TUTs_mama
April 24th, 2013, 08:24 PM
I find it impressive that the bone density between the sedentary individual compared to the active individual is so different! I would like to now see the sedentary man adopt a more active lifestyle and in a year's time do a second MRI to demonstrate the changes that can be made. Very inspirational!

pdjang
April 25th, 2013, 10:59 AM
Article:

Chronic Exercise Preserves Lean Muscle Mass in Masters Athletes
https://physsportsmed.org/sites/default/files/rpsm.2011.09.1933_secure.pdf

The photos are what is really interesting in this paper:

40-year-old triathlete (quadriceps, cross-sectional MRI view)
http://forums.usms.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=7447&d=1366834949

70-year-old sedentary man (quadriceps, cross-sectional MRI view)
http://forums.usms.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=7448&d=1366834960

74-year-old triathlete (quadriceps, cross-sectional MRI view)
http://forums.usms.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=7449&d=1366834969

Thanks for posting the study and pictures. While it is difficult to *precisely* compare, it is interesting that the 74 year old appears to have less adipose (fat) than the 40 year old. This may be a statistical artifact - but clearly striking! The cross section diameter of the femurs for both athletes are much greater than that of the sedentary man - and approximately the same diameter. I could not identify the femoral artery in any of the pictures but assume that the athletes would have better flow.

What is not stated in the post is if the athletes are female (my initial bias is that these samples are from males). I have been curious about the effects (benefits) of exercise with regards to menopause (and man-o-pause).

Thanks Jayhawk for an interesting post!

Bobinator
April 25th, 2013, 11:46 AM
I find it impressive that the bone density between the sedentary individual compared to the active individual is so different! I would like to now see the sedentary man adopt a more active lifestyle and in a year's time do a second MRI to demonstrate the changes that can be made. Very inspirational!

Another interesting side note would be that most of your potential bone mass is built (in females) at or before puberty. The best known way to build bone mass is by repeated impact exercise. Jump rope is an excellent way for pre-pubescent students to build strong bones and for all folks to maintain healthy bone mass.
This information also points to the need for dry-land training for athletes who get most of their exercise through low impact swimming....especially kids.