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Herb
April 28th, 2013, 09:41 PM
So I was watching the Spurs-Lakers game and Reggie Miller was talking about how Tim Duncan was in great shape, having one of his best seasons and that he had been back in the pool.

I knew he grew up a swimmer but apparently he was really good until a hurricane destroyed the one pool at his home in the Virgin Islands and so he had to quit around age 13.

I wasn't able to find anything more than that so would be interested in hearing more.

ALM
April 28th, 2013, 10:40 PM
From Wikipedia: "...He was born and raised in Christiansted, a town on Saint Croix, one of the main islands composing the United States Virgin Islands. In school, Duncan was a bright pupil and dreamt of becoming an Olympic-level swimmer like his sister, Tricia. His parents were very supportive and Duncan excelled at swimming, becoming a teenage standout in the 50, 100 and 400 meters freestyle and aiming to make the 1992 Olympic Games as a member of the United States Team.

When Hurricane Hugo destroyed the island's only Olympic-sized swimming pool in 1989, Duncan was forced to swim in the ocean and he quickly lost his enthusiasm for swimming because of his fear of sharks. Duncan was dealt another emotional blow when his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and died one day before his 14th birthday. In her last days, she made Duncan and his sisters promise to finish college with a degree, which would later explain Duncan's refusal to leave college early. Duncan never swam competitively again, but was inspired by his brother-in-law to turn to basketball..."

rxleakem
April 28th, 2013, 10:45 PM
I thought that was neat to hear, too. Wonder if he has ever dropped by a Maters practice in SA?

Thanks for the info, Jayhawk :)

sok454
April 28th, 2013, 10:48 PM
Doesn't Kris Humphries of Brooklyn Nets have some national record

notsofast
April 29th, 2013, 07:35 AM
Doesn't Kris Humphries of Brooklyn Nets have some national record

Faster than Phelps, back in the day. . .
http://espn.go.com/blog/new-york/new-jersey-nets/post/_/id/984/humphries-beat-olympic-swimmer-michael-phelps-when-he-was-10

pdjang
April 29th, 2013, 10:55 AM
From Wikipedia: "...He was born and raised in Christiansted, a town on Saint Croix, one of the main islands composing the United States Virgin Islands. In school, Duncan was a bright pupil and dreamt of becoming an Olympic-level swimmer like his sister, Tricia. His parents were very supportive and Duncan excelled at swimming, becoming a teenage standout in the 50, 100 and 400 meters freestyle and aiming to make the 1992 Olympic Games as a member of the United States Team.

When Hurricane Hugo destroyed the island's only Olympic-sized swimming pool in 1989, Duncan was forced to swim in the ocean and he quickly lost his enthusiasm for swimming because of his fear of sharks. Duncan was dealt another emotional blow when his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer and died one day before his 14th birthday. In her last days, she made Duncan and his sisters promise to finish college with a degree, which would later explain Duncan's refusal to leave college early. Duncan never swam competitively again, but was inspired by his brother-in-law to turn to basketball..."

My hypothesis is that the best swimmers are on the basketball court. Explosive power, great strength, aerobic conditioning, monster vertical leaps - but little motivation (would you rather make millions versus what swimming pays..), opportunity (cheaper to build and maintain a court as opposed to a swimming pool) and no mentors or coaches.

If an average NBA athlete decided to swim competitively (had the burning desire) and got national team support and coaching, I think the men's 100 free WR would be some where south of 44 seconds.

Just my 2 pesos.

jroddin
April 29th, 2013, 11:52 AM
My hypothesis is that the best swimmers are on the basketball court. Explosive power, great strength, aerobic conditioning, monster vertical leaps - but little motivation (would you rather make millions versus what swimming pays..), opportunity (cheaper to build and maintain a court as opposed to a swimming pool) and no mentors or coaches.

If an average NBA athlete decided to swim competitively (had the burning desire) and got national team support and coaching, I think the men's 100 free WR would be some where south of 44 seconds.

Just my 2 pesos.

What about the converse? I (used to) have an above average vertical jump (over 30 inches). But I was lousy at basketball because I had knee problems. My knees were always too close to the ground...:doh:

Frank Thompson
April 29th, 2013, 11:55 AM
The first person that comes to mine in this discussion when I first read this and he predates both Humphries and Duncan is Kiki Vandeweghe. You can read about him in the link I provided and see why he did not go on with swimming after having several National AAU records. http://www.thecrimson.com/article/1981/4/8/its-a-family-affair-pfor-the/

ekw
April 29th, 2013, 11:57 AM
If an average NBA athlete decided to swim competitively (had the burning desire) and got national team support and coaching, I think the men's 100 free WR would be some where south of 44 seconds.


Sounds like a great opportunity for pwb's proposed reality show though, alas, not with the 400 IM:
http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?22283-Forget-Splash!-next-reality-show-for-Lochte-should-be&highlight=splash+lochte

Herb
April 30th, 2013, 03:51 PM
The first person that comes to mine in this discussion when I first read this and he predates both Humphries and Duncan is Kiki Vandeweghe. You can read about him in the link I provided and see why he did not go on with swimming after having several National AAU records. http://www.thecrimson.com/article/1981/4/8/its-a-family-affair-pfor-the/

1981! That is some impressive research.

Herb
April 30th, 2013, 03:52 PM
My hypothesis is that basketball players would make the best tennis players. Tennis has some good athletes but imagine trying to hit a lob over Michael Jordan.

pwb
April 30th, 2013, 05:10 PM
I think if you look at the size and out-of-the-pool athleticism of some of our male elite swimmers today (e.g., Adrian, Grevers, those monstrous French dudes, even Kevin Cordes, plus more), we're already starting to see the impact of some guys who might have turned to other sports like basketball, but stuck with swimming.

Phelps changed the game and was the first rich pro swimmer. Say what you will about Lochte, but his ability to extend his earning potential out of the pool will make pro swimming more lucrative (IMHO) in the long term for other swimmers. I'm not saying we'll get to NBA compensation any time soon or have a huge number of pro swimmers making huge bucks, but the earning potential will increase. And the money will attract and retain talent.

SLOmmafan
June 20th, 2013, 07:02 PM
I just recently heard about Tim Duncan's swimming past. It is an interesting concept...that "small foot print" sports like swimming do not really get to attract the greatest athletes, precisely because they are drawn to sports more likely to send them into a professional and high paying career.

Granted, I still feel the talent level is very deep in USA swimming. Look no further than our Olympic Trials, which many collegiate level swimmers cannot even make the cuts for. I don't think the world is full of Michael Phelps'; talent can only take you so far and then comes the work. To speculate if someone could be faster if A and B and C also were the case, is an unrealistic endeavor with too many hypotheticals.