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View Full Version : Hot Water --Whining about the Whiners



jpetyk
May 28th, 2013, 07:41 AM
The pool was 85 degrees today. The motor on the exhaust fans is broken and won't be fixed until the pool closes in the summer. We can't open the outside doors on school days for safety reasons. School is still in session, so the gym teachers still have a say and frankly, are listened to more than an extra-curricular swim coach. SHUT UP ABOUT IT! :bitching: Constantly whining about the temperature of the water is not accomplishing anything. There is nothing anyone can do about it. The coach is constantly in contact with the custodians and the superintendent about the issue. SUCK IT UP OR STAY HOME. Look at the positives....1. They let us in at 5:15 AM 2. They do an amazing job of keeping the water crystal clear all the time! 3. We have the luxury of swimming long course, indoors, in April, in Pennsylvania! Phew. I feel better now. Thanks.

gobears
May 28th, 2013, 09:04 AM
lol. You could institute the "Two Positives for Every Negative" rule we used on my college team. For every negative comment you owe two positive ones. You've already done your part :)

sunruh
May 28th, 2013, 10:26 AM
its only 85?

man, what kind of story would we hear if the water hit 90 or 91 like it does here in the summer?
i usually bring my rubber ducky and mr bubble. makes workout much better.

of course right now i'm dreaming of trying to do just 1 stroke.

jpetyk
May 28th, 2013, 11:57 AM
The lack of air circulation makes it feel worse than it really is. I do, however, have a family of rubber duckies in my equipment bag that come out on days like today.

vo2
May 28th, 2013, 12:02 PM
Holy smokes that is hot. More power to ya if you can swim a workout in that. Pools near 90 by mid day here half the year so if I don't get a morning swim in the evening stuff is technique/drill only. I hear ya though beefing does no one any good. Last time I swam a hard workout in high 80's water I was dry heaving in the parking lot. Never again!

aztimm
May 28th, 2013, 12:51 PM
its only 85?

man, what kind of story would we hear if the water hit 90 or 91 like it does here in the summer?


Exactly. When I see complaints about water temp being 85, I just roll my eyes. Come to the metro Phoenix area in August, and you'll definitely see warmer. There have been times when the water has been 90F for workout. We swim outside, and they do use aerators overnight. But when the air temp gets up to 115+ during the day, and overnight lows are only 90 (if that low), well the water stays warm.

Celestial
May 28th, 2013, 01:22 PM
We had temps of 86 (at 5:30am) for about a month before the city would turn off the heaters. I can feel your pain. Then in one week, they not only turned off the heaters and kept the tarps off, they turned on the aerators. Pool temp by the end of the week: 79! It's glorious!
Way to stay positive in the face of so much negativism though, you are to be commended!

GregJS
May 28th, 2013, 02:04 PM
For some reason, our pool in Southern VT is often or normally in that temp range. Not sure why they keep it there. Maybe for older folks in exercise classes? But anyways, I think of it as kind of like the swimming equivalent of high-altitude training for runners! And it sure makes getting into the pool (my least favorite moment of the swim) easy.

Bill Sive
May 28th, 2013, 06:01 PM
In the past six days, counting today, I will have swum in five different pools. All with different temperatures, all outdoor pools. With the exception of one pool, which normally runs pretty warm, all the pools were fairly cool. Two of the pools were just at that temperature where its only cool when you stop swimming. I'll take the cool pools over the warm pool when swimming outdoors during daylight hours. I'll take the warm pool during fall and winter.

TooPro
May 28th, 2013, 09:59 PM
Im complaining because the water is so cold. I didn't wake up in time to eat breakfast, so I went on an empty stomach. Worst mistake of my life, I probably used a crap ton of calories to just stay warm. Calories I didn't have..

Fresnoid
May 28th, 2013, 11:16 PM
I'll take 85 over 79 every time.

Allen Stark
May 28th, 2013, 11:30 PM
I swim at 2 pools.One is 83.5 degrees,the other has risen to 87.5 degrees.Guess which on I like better.Can I whine about the hot one now :bitching: .

jaadams1
May 28th, 2013, 11:36 PM
I swim at 2 pools.One is 83.5 degrees,the other has risen to 87.5 degrees.Guess which on I like better.Can I whine about the hot one now :bitching: .
Do you happen to go to the Canby Swim Center?? I used to work there, along with being a coach for the age group team there back in the early 2000s.

__steve__
May 29th, 2013, 07:29 AM
Warm water I do not mind at all (80 - 85F). Hot and cold water (> 85 and < 80F, resp) I swim slower in because it takes more energy to regulate my temperature.

At meets it's not really the water temps that effect me, but the quality and temperature of air.

ekw
May 29th, 2013, 08:59 AM
I hate hot water and without an explanation as to why the water is hot and why it can't be fixed quickly, I'd be a whiner. However, when I have a perfectly reasonable explanation I generally manage to get over it and deal. :D

rxleakem
May 29th, 2013, 10:47 AM
:confused: Let me get this straight... Some of you have access to outdoor pools? :sad: And LCM pools? :cry: And some pools that are BOTH outdoor AND LCM? :eek:
Where can I :wine: about that? :D
:bolt:

knelson
May 29th, 2013, 11:05 AM
I've come to the conclusion that it's better to train in a warmer pool. My reasoning is you will get used to the warm water (within reason--I would guess anything in the upper 80s is tough to adapt to). Meets will feel great when the water is cool and tolerable when the water is on the warm side. OTOH, if you are used to always swimming in cool water you will struggle mightily if you have to swim in warm water.

Britt03
May 29th, 2013, 11:08 AM
I swam outdoors in College (South Florida) year round. Despite aerators the water was easily in the high 80s/low 90s daily over the summer. You get used to it eventually. Most disgusting thing I have experience was when we swam a set and I could feel the sweat running down my face during rest in between sets. Never experienced that before or since then.

orca1946
May 29th, 2013, 11:10 AM
Think of it like running in the heat or working out in a sweatsuit!. It will change----yes??

Allen Stark
May 29th, 2013, 02:34 PM
Do you happen to go to the Canby Swim Center?? I used to work there, along with being a coach for the age group team there back in the early 2000s.

They have a nice pool,but the lap swim hours don't work for me.The 83 degree pool is the Lake Oswego pool near my office.The 87 degree pool is at a golf club near my home.It is 20M,which is weird,but they have a good weight room so I like to go there when I swim and lift.It is also much more convenient on weekends.

hartley
May 29th, 2013, 05:28 PM
When you guys swim in pools that are "too hot" what exactly is it that makes it the most miserable? For me, my shoulders get really sluggish and I just can't seem to keep a high stroke tempo the way I can when I'm freezing.

Celestial
May 29th, 2013, 07:44 PM
Too hot not only makes me feel sluggish, but I truly get nauseous and frequently get a headache even if its not hot enough for the nausea. And I agree w/knelson, if you train in warm water, the meet pool then usually just feels glorious!

rxleakem
May 29th, 2013, 08:17 PM
Too hot not only makes me feel sluggish, but I truly get nauseous and frequently get a headache even if its not hot enough for the nausea. And I agree w/knelson, if you train in warm water, the meet pool then usually just feels glorious!

+1. Same here on all accounts. The key for me is to keep hydrated (before and during swim) and take more rest than usual. We also will cut distance set intensity and focus more on technique stuff.

Fresnoid
May 29th, 2013, 10:28 PM
I've never encountered water that as too warm for me to do a normal distance workout, even summers in Florida. Anything uner 80 is uncomfortable to me and makes my shoulders hurt worse than in warmer water.

ourswimmer
May 30th, 2013, 12:20 AM
I'll take 85 over 79 every time.


I've never encountered water that as too warm for me to do a normal distance workout, even summers in Florida. Anything under 80 is uncomfortable to me and makes my shoulders hurt worse than in warmer water.

I am a distance swimmer myself and I would like to report for the record that neither of these posts makes the slightest sense whatsoever.

scyfreestyler
May 30th, 2013, 12:30 AM
I'm accustomed to swimming outdoors throughout the year in a pool that typically ranges from 77-80, with occasional dips down to 75 and a rare spike up to 85. 85 is awful, and I don't swim distance. Just under 80 is great workout water for me.

__steve__
May 30th, 2013, 07:21 AM
I've never encountered water that as too warm for me to do a normal distance workout, even summers in Florida. Anything uner 80 is uncomfortable to me and makes my shoulders hurt worse than in warmer water.
Are you a runner by chance? Maybe runners might be more efficient at cooling core temps, and tend to lack thermal retentive abilities.

Fresnoid
May 30th, 2013, 09:47 AM
Are you a runner by chance? Maybe runners might be more efficient at cooling core temps, and tend to lack thermal retentive abilities.

That is absolutely fascinating. I am a swimmer, but I've only done swimming as an adult in 2008-9, then started again late 2011. However, I've been running without any significant time off since 1992. I do a 10+ miler most weekends. From June-Oct the air temp over 80. My body has definitely adjusted to deal with warm weather running. Perhaps lack of thermal retention goes along with it.

jpetyk
May 30th, 2013, 10:59 AM
Cooler water helps keep the bronchial spasms at bay (exercise induced asthma), and allows me to work harder longer. Hot water feels like I'm swimming through pudding, and drains all my energy. By 2 pm I'm ready for a nap, and despite my repeated suggestions that we have "siesta," my boss just chuckles and walks away. Air quality plays a big role too. 85 degree water on a 60 degree morning in an outdoor pool is just as comfortable as 80 degree water in an indoor pool that's poorly ventilated.

jpetyk
June 6th, 2013, 07:35 AM
It's amazing! Tuesday the water was pushing 87 degrees. A note from our coach to the school superintendent, stating that the KIDS were showing signs of heat exhaustion despite longer intervals and less time actually in the water, that she was going to have to file an insurance claim....today we had 82 degree water. :banana: It was glorious. The rubber duckies stayed in the equipment bag today. :bliss:

vo2
June 9th, 2013, 08:21 AM
When you guys swim in pools that are "too hot" what exactly is it that makes it the most miserable? For me, my shoulders get really sluggish and I just can't seem to keep a high stroke tempo the way I can when I'm freezing.

The ability to exert goes down quickly when it's too hot for me. Our LC pool is already 86* in the late afternoon as of last Wednesday. If I attempt to swim hard in that water I will invariably end up with the heaves due to dehydration. I can kinda sorta do very short stuff like broken 50's in the hot water, but to drop a pile of descending 200's in anything over 83 I'm on an egg timer for a 5 hour headache and laying on the couch.

The day I stop swimming at maximal efforts though is the day I will embrace hot water. If I'm just flopping around or doing technique I can keep up with hydration and tolerate the hot stuff.

__steve__
June 9th, 2013, 09:20 AM
Swimming in 86 water is much easier than running in 86 air

vo2
June 9th, 2013, 10:00 AM
Swimming in 86 water is much easier than running in 86 air

You know that is a really interesting observation. I come from a 26 year triathlon career and I found it to be the opposite for my bod. As long as I kept fluids coming in whenever I wanted them I performed best in heat. My PR for the HIM distance was in mid 90's weather at Gulf Coast in 1990. On any swims over Olympic distance I was always pounding fluids early in the bike. Hot water doomed me on race day b/c one can't pull over for water whenever one wants/needs it during the swim. My first IM I started the bike in a huge deficit and I never caught up hydration wise. At T2 I sat in the tent for 30 minutes drinking up b/f the run. I actually put a thread up here a few months ago asking if others experienced dehydration in hot water more than other activities. Dunno maybe I have a physical aberration that makes me prone to dehydration in water who knows.

The pool factor equally doomed me during my triathlon training days b/c it was 90% threshold training, 5ish seconds of rest. That's barely enough time to stop breathing hard enough to ingest even a swig of water, for me anyway. By the time I'd hit 2K I was a sponge!

arthur
June 10th, 2013, 11:10 AM
You know that is a really interesting observation. I come from a 26 year triathlon career and I found it to be the opposite for my bod. As long as I kept fluids coming in whenever I wanted them I performed best in heat. My PR for the HIM distance was in mid 90's weather at Gulf Coast in 1990. On any swims over Olympic distance I was always pounding fluids early in the bike. Hot water doomed me on race day b/c one can't pull over for water whenever one wants/needs it during the swim. My first IM I started the bike in a huge deficit and I never caught up hydration wise. At T2 I sat in the tent for 30 minutes drinking up b/f the run. I actually put a thread up here a few months ago asking if others experienced dehydration in hot water more than other activities. Dunno maybe I have a physical aberration that makes me prone to dehydration in water who knows.

The pool factor equally doomed me during my triathlon training days b/c it was 90% threshold training, 5ish seconds of rest. That's barely enough time to stop breathing hard enough to ingest even a swig of water, for me anyway. By the time I'd hit 2K I was a sponge!
If humidity is low, at any temperature sweating will help cool you when running. When humidity and temperature is high, running is awful. When pool/water temperatures get closer to body temperature, your body can't cool itself and it is easier to overheat.

__steve__
June 10th, 2013, 03:16 PM
Even though water is a poor thermal conductor, it still conducts more than air (over 4x), even humid air. The heat tranfer across the gradient (cooling) happens alot more in the pool

moodyrichardson
June 10th, 2013, 03:56 PM
Not to hijack the thread. Moderators, feel free to move this post if necessary.

Speaking of the warm environment. I'm currently a Senior majoring in Recreation Administration with a concentration in Aquatics. In one of my classes, we are studying Lifeguard Lung. I've been around water and been a lifeguard too, but this is the first time I've heard of this. Does anybody have any experience with this or more info?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/12/981216180159.htm

vo2
June 13th, 2013, 08:52 AM
If humidity is low, at any temperature sweating will help cool you when running. When humidity and temperature is high, running is awful. When pool/water temperatures get closer to body temperature, your body can't cool itself and it is easier to overheat.

Today was my final straw as our city LC pool was 85 degrees at 645 this morning. It was just shy of 90 at 5pm last night. I'm joining a new Masters program across town that keeps it's pool in sane ranges typically high 70's to a smidge over 80 at worst. You warm water animals are tougher than I am.....I officially quit the microwave sessions!

ekw
June 13th, 2013, 10:15 AM
Not to hijack the thread. Moderators, feel free to move this post if necessary.

Speaking of the warm environment. I'm currently a Senior majoring in Recreation Administration with a concentration in Aquatics. In one of my classes, we are studying Lifeguard Lung. I've been around water and been a lifeguard too, but this is the first time I've heard of this. Does anybody have any experience with this or more info?

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/12/981216180159.htm

I hadn't heard of it. I did a quick database search of my library's holdings and it looks like the authors of that study are the only ones to have used that term among the stuff in our holdings. (We have a med school so I think our collection is a reasonable sample.) I looked at citations for papers that cited their paper and saw a reference to hot tub lung as well. More generally I found things about respiratory symptoms, infectious diseases, etc. I also learned that hot tub is bubbelpool in Swedish. :)

swimcat
June 14th, 2013, 10:16 PM
Anything over 80 is too hot for me. If i want a hot pool, i will go to a hotel pool. Warm pools stuff up sinuses, zap energy etc. headaches.

__steve__
June 15th, 2013, 11:28 AM
I don't know why but I swim faster, have better UW efficiency, and am less prone to injury when the water isn't cool, and what's cold to me seems to be warm for others so it appears I'm the oddball. I'm usually shivering at meets and seek refuge by swimming in the the warmup pool if it's warmer.

Chris Stevenson
June 16th, 2013, 05:55 AM
Even though water is a poor thermal conductor, it still conducts more than air (over 4x), even humid air. The heat transfer across the gradient (cooling) happens a lot more in the poolExcept during running, even in humid air, you get significant heat loss due to evaporation. Not so much in swimming.

__steve__
June 16th, 2013, 06:46 AM
And breathing too, even with a snorkel.

Karl_S
June 16th, 2013, 07:52 AM
I don't know why but I swim faster, have better UW efficiency, and am less prone to injury when the water isn't cool, and what's cold to me seems to be warm for others so it appears I'm the oddball. I'm usually shivering at meets and seek refuge by swimming in the the warmup pool if it's warmer. I've noticed the same thing. It may have to do with flexibility. A few days ago I did my workout in a pool than was significantly warmer than the one where I usually train and I was astounded at my flexibility.

orca1946
June 16th, 2013, 09:20 PM
Mon. I start swimming outside for the summer in a 50 M pool.
Must remember to wear dark goggles for backstroke with the am sun in my eyes.

spin6trix
June 21st, 2013, 01:22 PM
Here's a suggestion!! Ask the lifeguard to turn on the hose, and but it in your lane!

That's what we did when in was too warm in the YMCA pool.

ElaineK
June 21st, 2013, 06:48 PM
Well, here I go again! The noodlers at our pool complained (loudly!) when our indoor pool temperature was turned down from 84 to 82 for the summer months. So, they petitioned and won a compromise of getting it turned up to 83. :shakeshead:

jpetyk
June 27th, 2013, 08:17 AM
The school district likes to play games. To "show" us, they turned the heat completely off and the water temp has been holding steady at 74 degrees. It's a bit chilly, but I love it! :bliss: I do feel bad for the one guy who never said a word about the heat...he wore a wetsuit to practice today. He was purple on Monday. Tomorrow is the last day at the school until September. I think I deal with the green water at the gym. They keep it at 82, and I don't have to worry about the rain.

vo2
June 30th, 2013, 06:44 AM
I hear ya! The new Masters group I joined 2 weeks ago keeps the temps fro 77-79 depending on the time of day it's been such a joy. Back to swimming hard and not feeling ill afterwards woot woot! Tip of the hat to my hardcore friends who are enduring late afternoon water temps over 90 degrees at our city LC pool.

The school district likes to play games. To "show" us, they turned the heat completely off and the water temp has been holding steady at 74 degrees. It's a bit chilly, but I love it! :bliss: I do feel bad for the one guy who never said a word about the heat...he wore a wetsuit to practice today. He was purple on Monday. Tomorrow is the last day at the school until September. I think I deal with the green water at the gym. They keep it at 82, and I don't have to worry about the rain.

Ken Classen
July 1st, 2013, 01:42 PM
I've come to the conclusion that it's better to train in a warmer pool. My reasoning is you will get used to the warm water (within reason--I would guess anything in the upper 80s is tough to adapt to). Meets will feel great when the water is cool and tolerable when the water is on the warm side. OTOH, if you are used to always swimming in cool water you will struggle mightily if you have to swim in warm water.One of the problems with high altitude training is that you can't work at the same intensity (speed) you can do at sea level. If your more of a mid to distance athlete I believe the same applies to pool temperatures, the warmer it is, the lower intensity of the training session. If you practice the training philosophy of swimming fast to race fast, warm water does tend to be a deterrent.