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magick17
July 21st, 2013, 01:24 PM
There's this kid on my sons team who has rapidly progressed in the past 2.5 years from not even a B swimmer to top 15 in the country(USAS). Now this swimmer also started using a rescue inhaler for the past year & takes it to the blocks before he swims & sorta brags about it.
Now my son insists he's cheating? Is this possible ?I say mind your own lane & after reading wada I don't believe it does ultimately have a huge impact...or does it?
This concerns me also because my youngest has ADHD pretty severely and her meds are also banned by wada and she seems to be successful. I know I can get them approved but I hate for her to be labeled a cheater also.

__steve__
July 21st, 2013, 02:53 PM
I thought Rescue inhalers only benefit those who are suppressed, and then only to the level of a non-asthmatic.

If your child needs her meds, she should have them. It is not giving her any advantage anyway

knelson
July 21st, 2013, 04:41 PM
Bronchodilators open the airways. Obviously if your bronchi are completely unobstructed then they will not increase the flow of air to your lungs, but I suspect many people have some level of obstruction (with the caveat that I'm not a doctor). Clearly asthmatics need to use them, but that doesn't mean that everyone using them truly has a need.

pendaluft
July 21st, 2013, 07:41 PM
If you don't have airway reactivity, the bronchodilator will have negligible effect. We test this all the time in the pulmonary function lab. Some people may feel that it helps them anyways, but we really don't have any proof that they do much for people without a demonstrable bronchodilator response. The side effects of the drug include elevated heart rate and jitteriness (for some). I think some people feel that this and think they are getting a boost.

jpetyk
July 22nd, 2013, 08:27 AM
It's possible that the improvement is a function of his being taller and stronger than he was 2 years ago. I went from a B swimmer to a AA swimmer between ages 13 and 15. When I started using an inhaler in college, my times remained the same. The difference made was that I wasn't coughing up a lung at the end of my races.

Chris Stevenson
July 22nd, 2013, 01:20 PM
This concerns me also because my youngest has ADHD pretty severely and her meds are also banned by wada and she seems to be successful. I know I can get them approved but I hate for her to be labeled a cheater also.

I'll leave the inhaler matter to others, I don't know much about them. I think the decision about your daughter's meds should be made with swimming out of the picture. If she weren't a swimmer (or other type of athlete), would you have the doctor prescribe them? If so then you should go ahead and get them approved and not worry about what others think.

ande
July 23rd, 2013, 10:39 AM
Inhalers
http://www.wada-ama.org/Documents/Science_Medicine/Medical_info_to_support_TUECs/WADA_Medical_info_Asthma_4.0_EN.pdf

A.D.D./A.D.H.D. Meds
http://www.wada-ama.org/Documents/Science_Medicine/Medical_info_to_support_TUECs/ADHD_EN.pdf

Rob Copeland
July 24th, 2013, 12:35 PM
I agree with Chris!

And, if your daughter is getting close to breaking national age group records or is finagling at senior nationals then I suggest you look into applying for a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).