PDA

View Full Version : I'm tired; should I still swim?



jaegermeister
August 3rd, 2013, 01:19 PM
I'm struggling to find the motivation and energy to get in the water today. Fast, demanding work week, finally a blessed AM of sleeping in without an alarm clock (at somewhere near 10 hours).

But I've got an open water swim a week from now. While I didn't get in enough yardage to need to taper, and my goals for the swim are simply to be safe and have fun, I don't want to be physically limited in the waters of Lake Superior. So I feel compelled to go to the pool.

How do others manage the trade-off of rest vs. training?

Off to the pool now. I'll let you know how it goes.

Bill Sive
August 3rd, 2013, 04:49 PM
Yes, swim. Just take it easy.

jaegermeister
August 4th, 2013, 02:34 PM
Bill, that's exactly what I did. Drilling, working on sighting, long repeats without the pace clock, etc.

And of course listening to the body is the obvious answer. On the way to the pool I was reflecting on what I'd posted, and it was obvious I needed an easier day than I might have imagined. Then I looked back at threads on this topic and a consensus seems to emerge: recovery is slower as we mature. I don't think that's a rationalization.

Runners have a simple "10 minute" rule of thumb: get out and run, and if you still feel crappy after 10 minutes, shut it down. Seems that an analogous rule of thumb for swimming might be that if you can't keep your stroke from becoming sloppy, then the intensity needs to go down.

Bill Sive
August 4th, 2013, 08:49 PM
When I swim its anywhere from a minimum of 2500 to as much as 6 or 7,000. I need those smaller 2500 days to off set the 7000 days. I also only want to know what time I started swimming and what time I finish swimming. I am not driven by the pace clock. Some pools where I swim do not have pace clocks so its the watch on the pool deck for me. If I swim more in a given amount of time, then I know my pace is improving.

If I do a new workout, I may swim less while trying something new. Its not a biggie for me. I do 6-8 workouts per week. A little less here or there is not going to make a big difference to me.

Sometimes, if the pool allows it, I jump or dive off the diving boards, do cannon balls etc. to break it up completely. It feels great and puts me back in a good frame of mind.

Bobinator
August 5th, 2013, 03:27 PM
Sometimes I think work stress makes me feel tired and lethargic so therefore I still pack off to the pool and give the workout a try. I am always patient with myself; if energy doesn't kick in after 20 minutes or so I drill or take it easy. On the flip side I've had some really wonderful workouts come out of days where I was dragging around work all day. It doesn't always make sense but in the end I feel like swimming is good for me either mentally, physically, and usually both. I'm glad your workout was good today!

aztimm
August 7th, 2013, 12:10 PM
Runners have a simple "10 minute" rule of thumb: get out and run, and if you still feel crappy after 10 minutes, shut it down.

I ran for many years and never heard of the 10 minute rule. Even when I wasn't feeling great, I'd usually at least do 5 miles. That was kind of my fall-back distance. When I ran with my dog, she'd pull me along so I didn't have much of a choice :)

For swimming, my fall-back distance is 2000 yards. I'll head to the pool, say I'll do a nice long warm-up, kicking, pulling, drills, and a warm-down. But once I'm in the water, after a warm-up I somehow get some energy back. Even when I feel like not going, I've always gotten in at least 2500, usually 3000+.

If I didn't workout when I wasn't feeling 100%, I'd be lucky to workout once a week.

jim thornton
August 8th, 2013, 09:24 AM
Tom, I came across the following a few years ago, and it has stuck with me: Mental fatigue impairs physical performance in humans J Appl Physiol 106: 857–864, 2009.First published January 8, 2009; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.91324.2008.

The abstract:

Marcora SM, Staiano W, Manning V. Mental fatigue impairs physical
performance in humans. J Appl Physiol 106: 857–864, 2009. First published
January 8, 2009; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.91324.2008.—Mental fatigue
is a psychobiological state caused by prolonged periods of
demanding cognitive activity. Although the impact of mental fatigue
on cognitive and skilled performance is well known, its effect on
physical performance has not been thoroughly investigated. In this
randomized crossover study, 16 subjects cycled to exhaustion at 80%
of their peak power output after 90 min of a demanding cognitive task
(mental fatigue) or 90 min of watching emotionally neutral documentaries
(control). After experimental treatment, a mood questionnaire
revealed a state of mental fatigue (P  0.005) that significantly
reduced time to exhaustion (640  316 s) compared with the control
condition (754  339 s) (P  0.003). This negative effect was not
mediated by cardiorespiratory and musculoenergetic factors as physiological
responses to intense exercise remained largely unaffected.
Self-reported success and intrinsic motivation related to the physical
task were also unaffected by prior cognitive activity. However, mentally
fatigued subjects rated perception of effort during exercise to be
significantly higher compared with the control condition (P  0.007).
As ratings of perceived exertion increased similarly over time in both
conditions (P  0.001), mentally fatigued subjects reached their
maximal level of perceived exertion and disengaged from the physical
task earlier than in the control condition. In conclusion, our study
provides experimental evidence that mental fatigue limits exercise
tolerance in humans through higher perception of effort rather than
cardiorespiratory and musculoenergetic mechanisms. Future research
in this area should investigate the common neurocognitive resources
shared by physical and mental activity.
exercise performance; endurance; perceived exertion; motivation

knelson
August 8th, 2013, 10:12 AM
I have to say one of the things I don't like about training with an age group team is that I know every single workout is going to be tough. I don't really have the option of swimming easy. I guess I could drop down to a slower lane, but it's still going to be essentially the same workout. So, for the most part, I end up swimming a hard workout or I don't swim at all.

Chris Stevenson
August 8th, 2013, 10:33 AM
our study provides experimental evidence that mental fatigue limits exercise
tolerance in humans through higher perception of effort rather than cardiorespiratory and musculoenergetic mechanisms

This isn't hard to believe at all.


for the most part, I end up swimming a hard workout or I don't swim at all.

Sounds like the basis of a bumper sticker: swim hard or go home.