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SpeedoRocks
September 16th, 2013, 04:01 AM
https://vimeo.com/74610042

Can you please help identify any problem with my freestyle? From arms to head to body to legs....
I try to kick much, but in the video it dosen't really show alot

__steve__
September 16th, 2013, 07:14 AM
Hard to tell, very shaky film.

Swimspire
September 16th, 2013, 11:07 AM
https://vimeo.com/74610042

Can you please help identify any problem with my freestyle? From arms to head to body to legs....
I try to kick much, but in the video it dosen't really show alot

Not sure if you received my reply to your previous post on the forum regarding distance per stroke, but in terms of the video that you are showing, I see that you take a breath every stroke on your right side. Are you able to breathe bilaterally at all?

Julia Galan
http://www.swimspire.com

SpeedoRocks
September 16th, 2013, 11:14 AM
Not sure if you received my reply to your previous post on the forum regarding distance per stroke, but in terms of the video that you are showing, I see that you take a breath every stroke on your right side. Are you able to breathe bilaterally at all?

Julia Galan
http://www.swimspire.com
i am learning bilateral breathing now. But i prefer to breathe on right side as i am trying to learn loping stroke

ElaineK
September 16th, 2013, 01:48 PM
Do you have pain in your right shoulder? If not, it may be something that develops over time unless you alter your stroke.

From what I can tell, your right hand enters with your palm facing out. To avoid future rotator cuff problems, I would recommend entering the water with your palm facing down and your hand parallel with the surface.

I am definitely no expert in freestyle technique; however, I have made it a point to learn the safest ways to swim so I can avoid injury. One of the first things I learned was to NOT enter my hand with my palm facing out.

knelson
September 16th, 2013, 02:11 PM
The major flaw I see is that you are dropping your elbow. Your elbow should remain as stationary as possible until your hand is below the line of your shoulders.

fdtotten
September 16th, 2013, 02:57 PM
The major flaw I see is that you are dropping your elbow. Your elbow should remain as stationary as possible until your hand is below the line of your shoulders.

The dropped elbows are your most critical flaw. While there are other stroke elements of your freestyle that could be adjusted for additional efficiency and balance, the dropped elbows are the most important priority to corrected at this time. Your body rotation to the right side and the left when pulling are good, but first before you begin each pull you must be patient to set up the front end of each right arm and left arm stroke with an early vertical forearm or EVF (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6R2jnYBeeA). The way to do that is just as knelson (http://forums.usms.org/member.php?1248-knelson) comments, "your elbow should remain as stationary as possible until your hand is below the line of your shoulders.

A good example of the high elbow freestyle swimming technique is the slow motion video of Sun Yang, 2012 Olympic Gold Medalist (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvM3JYC--hM). Just focus on the high elbow form of his swimming, the rest of his stroke is his unique way to swim. You will develop your own style of swimming with high elbows in EVF from doing freestyle drills and practicing the technique slowly and then gradually faster with increasing mastery of the skill.

One good way to practice the high elbow EVF technique is to slowly swim the freestyle drills of right arm only, left arm only, and then swim the freestyle catch up drill. Swim slowly enough that you can actually feel and see the forearm at nearly vertical under the elbow. The drills will need to be done almost each swim session as it will take time to develop the skills and cannot be rushed, as it is far more difficult to swim faster with EVF than slowly. Sculling is useful as well, and keep in mind that high elbow/EVF technique can expose possible shoulder vulnerabilities, so try to progress forward steadily and carefully.

Swimspire
September 16th, 2013, 06:14 PM
Great advice on this thread. ElaineK was especially astute in identifying the incorrect entry in the water with the right palm facing outward. This is indeed a source of shoulder injuries. And as other comments have mentioned on this thread, your elbow recovers too low on the left hand. The reason I would advise practicing bilateral breathing, as that will allow you to develop proper symmetry and will help you focus on what BOTH of your arms are doing during the recovery phase - high elbow recovery, proper hand placement, etc.


I would still recommend the drills that I suggested in your previous thread on distance per stroke. These drills will allow you to isolate specific areas of the body and work on strengthening your freestyle. In addition, you can try:


- Single arm (left arm and right arm)


- Single arm Thumb lead (right arm) : palm facing you, leading with the thumb vs the pinky for the entire recovery. Be sure to drag your fingertips lightly across the surface of the water during your recovery.


Good luck!

Julia Galan
www.swimspire.com (http://www.swimspire.com)

SpeedoRocks
September 16th, 2013, 07:46 PM
Thank you guys for the advice, and i certainly do have some pain in my right shoulder, which i had thought it was due to soreness, but now that i know of the flat hand entry, i will work on it. About the high elbow, do i have to pull with a 90 degree?
And is my hips abit too low, because i can see my legs are sinking.

__steve__
September 16th, 2013, 10:02 PM
From what I've read from a reliable source, the only time to apply force to the water is when both hand and forearm are close to perpendicular and facing back. Sometimes head position, from focusing at the pool bottom, instantly fixes the sinking hips