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SpeedoRocks
September 18th, 2013, 10:47 AM
There's a swim meet coming up in one and a half month's time, and i am planning to take on the 200m freestyle.
Can anyone help me specific on what drills and sets should i be focusing on?
And by the way i am training with weights too, following this program by jason lezak
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/jasonlezak1.htm
I am on the speed training phrase now though.
I am also doing the 3-3-3 drill swimspire recommended me and some finger drag catch up, but hope for some sets and other drills

__steve__
September 18th, 2013, 11:26 AM
I have no first hand tips for a distance event such as a 200, others more appropriate may chime in for that, but I do think any significant conditioning adaptation may be too late being a month away. With that said, look in to this for future 200's:

http://forums.usms.org/showthread.php?16710-How-much-time-on-a-broken-200&p=214516&viewfull=1#post214516

If you can make strength gains with dryland training, that can only help. Don't forget to taper some too. What can be accomplished is develop a strategy (check Ande's thread "Swimming Faster faster for the 200 pacing), work your streamline, block start. And a few tips would be to stretch your ankle's until the feet are floppy, and practice getting your arms streamlined locked behind head.

For drills, just have your stroke analyzed and from there you can figure out what drills can help, and it appears you are already on to that.

Good luck

Swimspire
September 18th, 2013, 12:16 PM
There's a swim meet coming up in one and a half month's time, and i am planning to take on the 200m freestyle.
Can anyone help me specific on what drills and sets should i be focusing on?
And by the way i am training with weights too, following this program by jason lezak
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/jasonlezak1.htm
I am on the speed training phrase now though.
I am also doing the 3-3-3 drill swimspire recommended me and some finger drag catch up, but hope for some sets and other drills

As Steve mentioned, one month's preparation will not give you too much opportunity to train specifically for the 200 freestyle. But you can use this as a 'time trial' just to get an idea of what level you are on for this particular event. I'm glad that you are using the drills I suggested. Go sparingly on the fingertip drag catchup as it is easy to get into the habit of swimming fullstroke that way.

The best thing to do would be a combination of drills and fullstroke. For example, 25 drill, 25 fullstroke for a 200...You can also go for sets of kick and drill, then sets of drill and fullstroke. Variety is the key.

Be sure to get your splits from the race and use this first time as a test run to see where you need to go from there.

Good luck!

Julia Galan
www.swimspire.com (http://www.swimspire.com)

Average John Smith
September 18th, 2013, 12:45 PM
Mr. Lezak's training methods are probably good in their own right .... but let's be honest.... he was not a middle distance swimmer. He was a 100 man. The 200m free needs more yardage based training to pull off succesfully. I would recommend getting in as much yardage as many days a week (in a long course pool) before this race as possible. You can not fake a 200m free the last length. A modest taper would be preferred as compared to a 100 free.

knelson
September 18th, 2013, 12:59 PM
I have no first hand tips for a distance event such as a 200

Distance event? Spoken like a true sprinter!

smontanaro
September 18th, 2013, 01:31 PM
You can not fake a 200m free the last length.

Sounds like a quote for a t-shirt. :)

arthur
September 18th, 2013, 01:40 PM
I don't know how much you train now, but for the last month or 3 weeks you shouldn't train any more than normal or your muscles will be broken down and you will swim slower. You might want to swim less distance and do more race pace swimming, such as broken 200s by 50 with 10 seconds rest between each 50 at your goal speed. If your goal is to swim as fast as possible I also wouldn't touch any weights within 10 days to 2 weeks from your meet. If you have a bigger meet you are swimming later then you might want to just take 1 week off weights or even less than that.

Swimosaur
September 18th, 2013, 03:32 PM
... broken 200s by 50 with 10 seconds rest between each 50 at your goal speed.

This. :agree: I've been using 15 sec rest between each 50; it seems to be tough enough for this old guy. This set improved my times in all 200s this year.

aztimm
September 18th, 2013, 04:22 PM
One set my coach likes to give us that seems to work well for the 200 is something like:

200 fast
200, broken @ 100 for 20 sec*
200, broken @ each 50 for 10 sec*
200, broken @ each 25 for 5 sec*
200 FAST

* for each broken swim, when you stop (except at the end), you should flip and do a foot touch. hand touch at the very end.

I think we do them on about a 4 min interval, enough so you get about a minute rest after each.

Have you swum a 200 in a meet before? If so, how was it, and when was it? Do you have a goal for this one?


And I agree that the 200 is not a distance event. Perhaps a mid-distance at best.

Average John Smith
September 18th, 2013, 06:20 PM
I swim on ego and memory...... the 200 free actually requires yardage and training...... so I don't do it anymore.

Allen Stark
September 18th, 2013, 08:53 PM
For a good 200 you need good technique,good conditioning ,and good sense of pace.You should already be working on conditioning and technique,so I'd focus on pace until the meet,with decrease in yardage in the last 2-3 weeks if this is a taper meet.Figure out what your goal 2nd 100 and goal last 50 is.Do 100s at last 100 speed with 2x the swim time for recovery,or do broken 200s with each 50 at the goal time and 10-20 sec rest,then rest 1 min and go againx4-6.Or you can do the Rushall set of 50s at goal speed with 20 sec rest doing as many as you can at that pace,sitting out one when you can't make the time and continuing for about 20.(When I try the Rushall method I end up with the broken 200s as 4 in a row is what I can get at race pace,on a good day.)

pwb
September 19th, 2013, 12:34 AM
I swim on ego and memory...... the 200 free actually requires yardage and training...... so I don't it anymore.I swim in events that have rhyme and reason ... the 200 free has neither ... so I don't do it anymore.

jaadams1
September 19th, 2013, 03:28 AM
I swim in events that have rhyme and reason ... the 200 free has neither ... so I don't do it anymore.Call me what you will, but I agree with this. The weird part is I'd rather be doing a 200 Fly than a 200 Free in a meet! I have been known to enter the 200 Free event with my 200 Fly time, and have fun racing. :)

Swimspire
September 19th, 2013, 08:48 AM
SpeedoRocks, I wanted to add that I agree with Arthur in regards to the weight training - don't overdo it, especially since you mentioned that you are having some pain in your right shoulder. Its wonderful to see how eager and willing you are to improve your swimming, but just work on steadily improving your endurance and your technique so that you can be pain-free. Looking forward to hearing about how the race goes!

pwb
September 19th, 2013, 02:09 PM
The weird part is I'd rather be doing a 200 Fly than a 200 Free in a meet! I have been known to enter the 200 Free event with my 200 Fly time, and have fun racing. :)well, the 200 fly is an exquisite event of subtle and sublime beauty, with nuances and complexities that simultaneously can be enjoyed in a single race and yet take a lifetime to learn.

Average John Smith
September 19th, 2013, 06:20 PM
Good grief...... the 200 fly?! Surely you are kidding. That event is a nuclear bomb waiting to happen. Either you are born a 200 flyer or you avoid it like the plague.

Chris Stevenson
September 19th, 2013, 07:48 PM
When I have a good swim (which generally means "when I don't take it out too fast") then the 200 fly can be sublime.

But a bad 200 fly...that's the only event where I can seriously doubt my ability to finish the race.

It is a little fun, in a morbidly fascinating kind of way, watching OTHERS implode on the last length of a 200 LCM fly, though.

But I digress: the 200 free is a fun race, I don't know what you haters are talking about. The advice about using broken 200s is a good one. One type of broken 200 that can reproduce the feel of the actual race is to decrease the amount of rest between 50s as you progress (eg, take 10/8/6 sec between 50s) while trying to hold close to race pace. Another option is to break it as 75/75/50, instead of at the 50s, taking first 15 then 10 sec rest at the breaks.

StewartACarroll
September 19th, 2013, 08:26 PM
I was going to stay out of this but I can't resist. As much as I detest swimming and training for the 200 due to the pain you go through its an awesome event when swum right. I find it to be the easiest race to screw up, either going out too hard or not hard enough and either way you end up hurting like no other event. It's just far enough it's impossible to sprint and just short enough you can't get into a rhythm.

That all said its one of my favorite events. I like to do the broken 200s at 50s as others have suggested but also train 225 or 250s trying to get the endurance you need to finish the 200. In your case you are probably too close to the meet to build endurance with this kind of set. I would personally work on pacing the race by doing 150s where the middle 100 you hold your desired 200 pace. Or even 75s with 25 easy, 50 at your 200 pace. I think finding a pace you feel good at is important. Also don't underestimate the value of working on your streamline off the walls on these pace sets.

ElaineK
September 19th, 2013, 09:51 PM
Good grief...... the 200 fly?! Surely you are kidding. That event is a nuclear bomb waiting to happen. Either you are born a 200 flyer or you avoid it like the plague.

Or, neither. :D I may "race" 200 fly like a tortoise, but I enjoy it. Call me a maniac (or Elaine-iaK), but I enjoyed swimming my 2,000 fly (and 900... and 1,000) last year. :bliss:

Michael Heather
September 20th, 2013, 06:35 AM
I will treat this as if it is a big meet. Quit weights a month in advance. Do broken 200s with various rest intervals, you will find one you like and one that is really tough. They both may be the same. Make sure someone is watching your stroke technique, you don't want to make any big changes. Get a lot of rest out of the pool. Don't overtrain and don't worry about low yardage workouts. Tapers are very nerve wracking for those who don't understand them and/or have never been given a good one.

Before the race get a good warm up, finishing with a couple of hard build 50 or 100s. Feel the speed within 20 minutes of your race.

sunruh
September 20th, 2013, 09:14 AM
Good grief...... the 200 fly?! Surely you are kidding. That event is a nuclear bomb waiting to happen. Either you are born a 200 flyer or you avoid it like the plague.

REAL MEN race the 200 fly

smart men watch it!

GregJS
September 20th, 2013, 07:14 PM
Then I guess I'm a regular genius because I watch all fly races of any length!

robertsrobson
September 25th, 2013, 04:28 AM
Our main set from last night (with 1000m mixed warm up/prep) - SCM:

4x50 with 10s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery
2 x100 with 15s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery
50/100/50 with 10-15s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery
2 x100 with 15s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery
4x50 with 10s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery

All on 4 minutes. It was tough - but the 200 recovery helps to keep the quality high.

Viktor_Dembski-1969
September 25th, 2013, 10:59 AM
Our main set from last night (with 1000m mixed warm up/prep) - SCM:

4x50 with 10s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery
2 x100 with 15s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery
50/100/50 with 10-15s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery
2 x100 with 15s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery
4x50 with 10s rest @ 200 RP
200 recovery

All on 4 minutes. It was tough - but the 200 recovery helps to keep the quality high.


And all this in one workout ??? Hard :applaud:

Karl_S
September 25th, 2013, 08:45 PM
And all this in one workout ??? Hard :applaud:
Agreed. In fact, for me I would say near impossible to hold 200 pace on all those broken swims.