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suphillips
September 28th, 2013, 10:00 PM
I'm seeing conflicting information about shoulder exercises for swimming. A recent article on SwimSwam (http://swimswam.com/shoulder-maintenance-important-swimmer-levels/) talks about doing all the Jobe's Shoulder Exercises to help prevent shoulder injury. But then I've seen other info that warns swimmers against over-training the shoulders in their cross training, and avoiding dryland work on the muscles we already work a'plenty (like here: http://saycoperformance.com/blog/uncategorized/swimmers-eight-strength-training-mistakes-to-avoid/)

So what do you think of this, ie focusing the dryland on the lesser-used muscles? Which Jobes exercises would you ditch?

__steve__
September 29th, 2013, 10:43 AM
I think it just might boil down to listening to your body's response to whatever activity it endures. We need more recovery time as we age, and with swimming 30,000 yards a week there could be little room for stuff that could be otherwise beneficial.

gull
September 29th, 2013, 12:02 PM
Not really conflicting. There are shoulder exercises that should be avoided, like dips. But exercises that strengthen the rotator cuff should be performed on a regular basis. I do many of the Jobe's exercises several times per week using Thera Bands. Resistance should be light as these are relatively small muscles. It is helpful to have a physical therapist demonstrate proper technique.

Allen Stark
September 29th, 2013, 12:15 PM
I have done a series of rotator cuff exercises exercises for years since I dislocated my right shoulder in 1998..Since rehabbing from a partial tear and finding out my rotator cuff muscles were being overpowered by my pects and lats,I have added more.Looking at the 2 referred to articles I didn't really see any contradiction between them.The second article didn't say not to strengthen the rotator cuff,it implied one should, to counter balance the large muscles in front of the shoulders,mainly the pecs,that pull the shoulder forward into the impingement position.A strong rotator cuff can prevent,or at least postpone and mitigate shoulder pain and debility.If you don't do rotator cuff exercises now,you will when your physical therapist or orthopedist says you have to.

__steve__
September 29th, 2013, 12:38 PM
. There are shoulder exercises that should be avoided, like dips. .Just recently (like just over a week ago) first handedly confirmed that dips are incompatible with an instable (unstable?) shoulder. I did a set of 9 x 8 and the following several days my bum shoulder was loose, creaky, and in the mood to dislocate. Never will I do dips again! I must perform pushups once a year for my job, but the list of never to do movements include
1) dips
2) military presses
3) bench presses (incline included)
4) handstands (I was getting good at these)
5) or any other pressing

All my strengthening exercises include dumbbells, band, cables, and rotater cuff movements.

If my shoulders are tired from swimming I do nothing strenuous

ourswimmer
September 29th, 2013, 02:14 PM
If you don't do rotator cuff exercises now,you will when your physical therapist or orthopedist says you have to.
:agree:

I liken them to flossing.