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lv2swim
December 8th, 2014, 08:53 AM
What do I need to know about keeping myself healthy when swimming outdoors in a warm pool with warm air temperatures? Today was my first, outdoor swimming workout in a 25 meter pool. Usually I swim 3,500 yards, 4-5 days/week in a very well maintained indoor pool but have just moved from Virginia to Saudi for several months. Should I have special goggles, wear sunscreen and most importantly should I adjust the intensity of the workout with more rest between sets, and extra water on the side? (I should have checked for flags before doing backstroke, ouch!)

Bill Sive
December 8th, 2014, 09:17 AM
Goggles - depends on what time of day. Early morning, or early evening smoked goggles. During middle part of day polarized goggles.

Sunscreen, yes. You may want to wear a rash guard, or other type of shirt you can swim in for additional coverage from the sun.

Stay hydraded, not to the point of being overhydraded. Definitely have your favorite sport drink handy.

Use a body wash with a good built in moisturizer.

No need to adjust your workout, unless you feel you need to. Depends on how intense the heat of the day is.

flystorms
December 8th, 2014, 02:48 PM
What Bill said ^^^^

Try SolRx44 (find it on Amazon) for a waterproof/failproof sunscreen. Great stuff that's not nasty sticky and it holds up well in tropical sun.

pwb
December 8th, 2014, 11:03 PM
Do what I try to do in the heat of the Arizona sun - swim in the dark. If you have access to pools before the sun rises, that will be your coolest & best time of day to swim. After the sun goes down will be hotter, but you won't have the extra burn of the sun. While I've never had a problem with not enough salt, a lot of runners in the desert I know use salt pills.

lv2swim
December 10th, 2014, 11:25 PM
Thank you all for your advice! Just to be clear, does warm water affect the swimming workout? (My daughters are loving it and stay in the pool the entire time I practice that never happened in our pool back in VA.) Enjoy the day!

pwb
December 11th, 2014, 03:42 PM
Just to be clear, does warm water affect the swimming workout? Above a certain temperature, it can be dangerous, depending upon your intensity. I definitely cannot push myself as hard as I want once the water gets above 82/83 degrees F.

lv2swim
December 12th, 2014, 11:55 AM
Ok, thank you that was my main concern but I certainly appreciate all the advice regarding swimming outdoors!

knelson
December 12th, 2014, 01:02 PM
Thank you all for your advice! Just to be clear, does warm water affect the swimming workout?

Above a certain temperature it will, but I think you'll find your body can acclimate to a point. Just be sure to keep drinking throughout the workout and definitely back off if you feel like you aren't able to maintain your body temperature.

lv2swim
December 13th, 2014, 11:50 AM
Again, thank you all!

Allen Stark
December 13th, 2014, 03:15 PM
You can buy a pool thermometer pretty cheaply. Temperature below 83 Farenheit are fine for almost all work outs. 83-86 are OK for most moderate work outs,but you may need shorter distances and longer rest. Above 86 can get you over heated pretty easily,so definitely shorten your distances and increase your rest.

lv2swim
December 20th, 2014, 07:31 AM
That is a good idea. The last couple days the water temp. has been a tad cooler, not a lot, but if it remains consistently warm I will do try this. Thank you.

lv2swim
January 4th, 2015, 07:27 AM
I have learned from the lifeguards that they try to keep the pool at 84F but it is usually at 86 since that is the temperature most folks like for swimming. They also told me that they will be putting the flags up soon which makes me very happy 'cause my backstroke is suffering a bit without flags and a ceiling for guidance. Today was cloudy so the water was cooler which felt good so I decided to work on backstroke since the sun would not be in my eyes. I tangled with the lanes lines a number of times. Does that mean I have a side that is significantly weaker...seems the left side kept running into the lines. Is there a method to keeping straight when swimming outdoors with only the sky to follow?

Glenn
January 4th, 2015, 09:16 AM
When the water is on the warm side (83), I bring two bottles of water. One is to stay hydrated and the other is to pour over my head and upper body to cool me off between repeats. When it gets really warm, I find I have to pop out of the pool and sit on the deck for a few minutes.

The suggestion to swim in the dark is a good one. I prefer early morning (water is cleaner, having been filtered all night), but evening could also work.

Swimspire
January 4th, 2015, 10:50 AM
To answer your question about the backstroke: your stroke is clearly asymmetrical in some way, but there are a few reasons that might explain the cause. This could be because you are weaker on one side, but it could also be because you are crossing over. Since you are swimming outdoors, you should try tilting your chin slightly downwards. You won't be looking directly into the sun, and you will be able to spot where you are in the lane, adjusting your stroke accordingly to maintain your ideal position. Hope this helps!

lv2swim
January 6th, 2015, 12:59 AM
Glenn, I have done the cool water cool down it feels so good! Winter has arrived to this area so the air is cooler and the water as well but then I have heard they are working on trying to bring the pool temperature down. I am not the only one to mention that it was too warm but not sure most patrons will enjoy it at 80F.

Swimspire, I tried the chin down thing it felt really awkward so decided to ride the line rather than fight it. I do think that in all my strokes my left side is the weakest. (Not sure if I should focus on doing more drills with the left side.) I plan to eventually post all my strokes for guidance since I am now swimming alone. My daughter video'd fly yesterday...very sad...and revealing. Can't bring myself to post it!

lv2swim
January 11th, 2015, 06:33 AM
[QUOTE=Swimspire;302945]To answer your question about the backstroke: your stroke is clearly asymmetrical in some way, but there are a few reasons that might explain the cause. This could be because you are weaker on one side, but it could also be because you are crossing over. /QUOTE]

Just reviewed a video of my backstroke. Upon entry my right hand clearly passes 12 and my left hand is on 12. In backstroke should I be aiming to enter at 11 and 1? Amazing what a video can reveal!