PDA

View Full Version : Altitude & top ten times?



DocWhoRocks
April 1st, 2004, 10:11 AM
Just wondering for top ten times if any adjustment is made to times to account for elevation?

Thanks,

Doc

Tom Ellison
April 1st, 2004, 10:16 AM
GREAT QUESTION?
If my memory has not slid to far.....I THINK some % used to be given in NCAA swimming in years past....Please do not hold me to that...

tjburk
April 1st, 2004, 10:22 AM
Doc, I know of a web site that lets you convert times based on altitude! If that will help? Here is the link!http://www.csiorg.coursealti.asp (http://www.csi.org/coursealti.asp)

Hope it helps!:D

DocWhoRocks
April 1st, 2004, 10:44 AM
I know the conversions. What I'm wondering is, for top tens times in masters swimming, do converted times adjusted for altitude count?

Say you a 500 in 5:00 at 5200 ft. That converts to about 4:55. Would the converted time count for a top ten time? (assumming the converted time was fast enough to be in the top ten).

tjburk
April 1st, 2004, 10:47 AM
Good question! I believe the one to answer that would be Mr. Matysek! Me personally, I think they should count.

seltzer
April 1st, 2004, 10:58 AM
Conversion tables can usually be used for "qualifying" times (with US Olympic Trials a notable exception) but not for record purposes since you cannot be credited with a time that you did not actually swim for record purposes.

Rob Copeland
April 1st, 2004, 11:20 AM
Bob is correct for USMS (as well as NCAA and USA-S) altitude adjustments are only applicable for National qualifying times. Not for Top 10 or records.

The following text and table is from the 2004 USMS rule book:
(1) Altitude adjustment—Times achieved at an altitude of 3000 feet or higher may be adjusted, for NQT purposes only, by subtracting the adjustment times (in seconds) from the actual time achieved. The specific adjustments for each age group and gender are found in Appendix B. The adjustments shall be determined every 4 years starting in 1998. The adjustment times for men and women competitors shall be calculated by multiplying the time adjustment in the following table by the ratio of the 200-yard freestyle national record for the age group to that of the 25–29 200-yard freestyle for men and women, respectively. The values in the following table shall be those determined and used for the same purpose by USA Swimming.
Note: Records and Top Ten, etc., are to be actual times swum, not adjusted for altitude.
3000–4249 ft -- 4250–6499 ft -- 6500+ ft
200 yards/meters -- 0.5 -- 1.2 -- 1.6
400–500 yards/meters -- 2.5 -- 5.0 -- 7.0
800–1000 yards/meters -- 5.0 -- 10.0 -- 15.0
1650 yards/1500 meters -- 11.0 -- 23.0 -- 32.5


With apologies for how the table looks here.

DocWhoRocks
April 1st, 2004, 11:25 AM
That's what I thought, just checking. Thanx for the info. :)

knelson
April 5th, 2004, 01:41 PM
I wonder how they come up with these conversions? Obviously the air has less oxygen at altitude, but it seems like it would be difficult to assess, say, how a 10% reduction in the amount of oxygen available affects your times. Anyone have any idea? I would think the best way would be to time many swimmers at several altitudes and see how their times varied on average, but there are so many other factors at work, not to mention availability of the data might not be great.

swimshark
April 5th, 2004, 02:41 PM
Originally posted by tjburk
Doc, I know of a web site that lets you convert times based on altitude! If that will help? Here is the link!http://www.csiorg.coursealti.asp (http://www.csi.org/coursealti.asp)

Hope it helps!:D

Terry, thanks! that helps me with my times from this weekend. It took 11 sec. off my 1605 time.

-A

DocWhoRocks
April 7th, 2004, 09:34 AM
Originally posted by swimshark


Terry, thanks! that helps me with my times from this weekend. It took 11 sec. off my 1605 time.

-A

You swim a 1605? What an odd event :p ;) :D

swimshark
April 7th, 2004, 10:38 AM
Originally posted by DocWhoRocks


You swim a 1605? What an odd event :p ;) :D

Okay, you got me. :D Can I chalk it up to the change in altitude? :)