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ddl
May 31st, 2016, 03:22 PM
I suppose the pros do a lot of dryland exercises since that's part of their living :D What about the amateurs? Is it crucial in order to swim right and well? Especially the core training?

ForceDJ
May 31st, 2016, 07:18 PM
Do running and bicycling count?

I've never done "wetwater" exercises as part of those activities.

Dan

ddl
June 1st, 2016, 12:28 AM
Do running and bicycling count?

No. Dryland training specifically for swimming purpose. e.g. using resistance band to imitate strokes, etc.

What I wonder is, if you have free access to pools 24 hours a day, couldn't you do all the trainings in the water? Or are some exercises more effective when done on dryland? Take, for example, the resistance band exercises, how is it better than actually pulling water in the pool?

waves101
June 1st, 2016, 12:48 PM
As a master's swimmer I never really made time to do dryland. But, when I was at LCM Nationals last summer, a fellow team member interviewed several of the elite swimmers in masters. The overall message was the importance of retaining muscle mass and to do so everyone of them recommended a dryland regime. I started mine the very next week. Fast forward to this spring's Nationals. Some of my results were the fastest I'd been in 6 years. The only other thing I started was a protein shake so between the two, I believe, they were both important. Our dryland is focused on body weight exercises (almost no weights) and includes specific activities aimed at reducing injury for swimmers.

quicksilver
June 1st, 2016, 01:06 PM
I think at some point, every competitive masters swimmer should be taking time to do dryland or go to the gym. Sooner or later everyone is going to hit a plateau, and having the additional strength will stave off the eventual decline. This all depends on your age of course. (Some 30 somethings will keep improving well into their 40's before they experience any noticeable performance loss)

Also...Swimming alone is not an impact sport, and there are many older swimmers who may encounter loss in bone density despite how often they hit the water. I recall seeing an article on osteoporosis (http://www.livestrong.com/article/443091-the-effect-of-swimming-on-bone-strength/) in elderly swimmers and it was quite surprising.

Anyway, dryland is definitely a benefit. It let's you break out the proverbial can of whoop-ass on the last lap of your 100....and most importantly, will help you retain muscle mass and density well into your AARP years and beyond.

Mark Usher
June 1st, 2016, 01:43 PM
I do dryland training a couple times a week, both to enhance my swimming and to help offset the loss of muscle mass that comes with age.
I like using stretch bands because you can simulate the compound motions of the stroke which increases the specificity of the exercise. I also do basic body weight exercises like push ups, pull ups, planks, etc.

imbacktoit
June 1st, 2016, 05:35 PM
As a 50-something female masters swimmer, strength-training is very important. While I think I gain a lot of strength just by swimming, I add resistance band exercises, planks, pull-ups & all kinds of core exercises in 2 30-minute workouts per week. Quicksilver hits the nail on the head in his last paragraph. I think it gives you a leg up in competition & helps you churn thru those tough sets in workouts.
I've actually been thinking about running short distances several times a week to help with the cardio end of things.

__steve__
June 1st, 2016, 07:00 PM
I've actually been thinking about running short distances several times a week to help with the cardio end of things.I do this. Like 800m AFAP.

If you haven't been running it's very easy to injure yourself starting though

worthyadvisor
June 1st, 2016, 07:51 PM
Hi there! I've returned to training for open water swimming recently, and because of a back injury, I have to do dryland stuff in addition to the simming, but I'm at a loss of how to schedule the dryland workouts vs. my water workouts. Sometimes doing a swim after the dryland stuff is great for the back, but it's long and tiring. Should I alternate days? Only do the dryland stuff a couple of times a week? Any thoughts?

Thanks!

quicksilver
June 2nd, 2016, 10:26 AM
Hi there! I've returned to training for open water swimming recently, and because of a back injury, I have to do dryland stuff in addition to the simming, but I'm at a loss of how to schedule the dryland workouts vs. my water workouts. Sometimes doing a swim after the dryland stuff is great for the back, but it's long and tiring. Should I alternate days? Only do the dryland stuff a couple of times a week? Any thoughts?

Thanks!

Alternating days is best. It can be difficult to go back to back with activities. Avoid burning out and making your fitness time an enjoyable routine is important to stay consistent.

I usually swim M,W,F and use the gym on T,Th and sometimes Sat. (Depending on age, you should always fit in a recovery day).

As far as types of dryland, it doesn't necessarily have to be heavy weights. Most facilities have a variety of weight machines, including rowing machines, and stair masters. This time of year is excellent for bike riding, and stand up paddle boarding. An excellent cross over sport for swimmers!

worthyadvisor
June 6th, 2016, 12:53 PM
I was thinking that way myself (I think the trainer I got at the gym was a little over zealous about scheduling.) Thanks for the suggestions!

orca1946
June 6th, 2016, 02:55 PM
My in season regime is --- 3 days in the pool + 4 days at the gym with weights and cardio for 1 1/2 - 2 hours + one training session with my swim specific trainer. Not too bad for a 70 years of age swimmer that took High point trophy in the state and 5 medals at Greensboro nationals!

ddl
June 7th, 2016, 01:06 AM
My in season regime is --- 3 days in the pool + 4 days at the gym with weights and cardio for 1 1/2 - 2 hours + one training session with my swim specific trainer. Not too bad for a 70 years of age swimmer that took High point trophy in the state and 5 medals at Greensboro nationals!

:applaud::applaud:

smiley92407
June 9th, 2016, 07:34 PM
Since most of my swim workouts are at 24 Hour Fitness, I have an area for stretching, and various machines for exercising and weightlifting. I have no excuse not to do dryland exercises.

worthyadvisor
June 10th, 2016, 03:56 PM
Yeah, I'm at a 24 Hour Fitness, too, and they are really nicely set up to make it easy to do both my swimming and dryland stuff.

Just to update, I'll probably do 3 days swimming 2-3 days strength training. I have to remind myself that I'm still recovering from injury, so...

Mullenski
June 11th, 2016, 06:09 PM
Yes! A must!

ElaineK
June 11th, 2016, 06:21 PM
Pre-swim routine, 6 days/week:
Foam roller (full body routine takes about 10-15 minutes)
Dynamic stretching (Arm circles, leg circles ankle circles, etc., 5 minutes)

Post-swim routine (45 minutes):
Physical Therapy exercises assigned by past/current PT's. (Theraband, hand weights, etc.)
Crunches
Planks
Yoga (Ahhhh...:bliss:)

gdanner
June 14th, 2016, 11:16 AM
Generally speaking, I think it can be good. The difficulty is managing energy levels and making sure you're not too tired or sore to swim. My dryland training is minimal by design. Also, I've had great seasons where I did very little (or practically nothing) outside of the pool in the months leading up to the big meet.

robertsrobson
June 17th, 2016, 05:43 AM
I do 3 x 1 hr swim, 3 x weights (usually a bit less than an hour). I guess that 6 swims might be as beneficial, and in certain (esp 200 breast LC!) events I'd probably swim faster. However: I like the variety and would soon get bored of swimming all the time; I enjoy strength work; I think it keeps me leaner; I can do it in between dropping off and picking up the kids at their sports; it helps me swim faster (at least in the shorter events); it helps my mobility; there are health benefits that swimming won't provide.... ...and so on.

For me it is only positive. I invest in a strength and conditioning coach that helps with programming and assessment, with occasional support in the gym (i.e. not a personal trainer) and that really helps to make sure that I get benefit from it. I can confidently plan my own swim work, not so much gym.

To gdanner's point - when I was setting my own programme I was flogging myself. Now, I have support for a 'minimal dose response' approach - do what you need to do and no more. However, I don't see being sore in the pool as an issue in itself as it's all part of my training - not getting in the way of my training.

Viktor_Dembski-1969
June 19th, 2016, 11:01 AM
Robert, you showed excellent result in London. Sincerely I congratulate :applaud:!!!!!!
To have 1.09 by 100 m a breaststroke at three trainings a week in the pool it is super :applaud:!!!!!!

robertsrobson
June 20th, 2016, 08:18 AM
Robert, you showed excellent result in London. Sincerely I congratulate :applaud:!!!!!!
To have 1.09 by 100 m a breaststroke at three trainings a week in the pool it is super :applaud:!!!!!!

Thank you - very kind. Incidentally, I don't think that by doing much more my times would drop that much over 100m. A warm up probably would have helped more ;-). I felt very strong over the 100m LC off my training. Less so in the 200m. I was done by 150m but set my focus on the shorter events.