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ElaineK
May 23rd, 2017, 06:54 PM
As Masters swimmers, we hear this advice often when it comes to questioning if we are doing too much and taxing our bodies too much: “Listen to your body…”

HOW DO YOU KNOW WHAT TO LISTEN FOR IF IT TELLS YOU AFTER THE FACT???

Ironically, just after submitting this (http://www.swimspire.com/staying-self-motivated-as-a-solo-swimmer/) article to Swimspire, my body decided to crap out on me all at once. After having a positive period of several months of training in the pool where I was feeling (and doing) great, it all of a sudden went downhill. One day I felt great after a terrific workout, and the next day, I didn’t. That following day, an elbow injury* from February and a shoulder repetitive stress injury** from March—both land-based injuries that had not affected my swimming at all—came into the pool with me. I previously had been able to swim all four strokes with no pain; the shoulder only hurt at night when I tried to sleep on it, and the elbow was only sensitive to the touch and if I bumped it.

I backed off when my shoulder and elbow started to bother me, and I spent the workout doing easy drills. When it came time to doing breaststroke kick, I started to ache in my right hip—the side I had operated on in December of 2014 for a labral tear and psoas (hip flexor) release. I immediately stopped and switched to freestyle, but that started aching, too.

This went on for a few days. I kept backing off yardage and speed, and I avoided race-pace; however, it was too late. My left shoulder, right elbow, and right hip just felt bad.

Knowing I would have the National Senior Games coming up next month, I thought it best to have my shoulder and elbow checked out for a diagnosis. I made the mistake of going to a chiropractor recommended to me by a former USMS member in my city who broke a World Record. This swimmer credited his chiropractor for staying healthy and being able to stay in competition as long as he (the swimmer) did, because he had chronic shoulder problems due to land-based injuries.

To make a long story short(er), it was a big mistake. The chiropractor’s shoulder manipulation made it worse, and I may have a labral tear. My MRI shows bursitis and osteoarthritis, but my orthopedic surgeon says I may have a labral tear as well (based on yesterday’s exam).

I didn’t let the chiropractor get near my hip, but my surgeon says I either aggravated the scar tissue (again) or tore the labrum (again).

Meanwhile, I was also diagnosed with elbow tendonitis (tennis elbow). It was like everything blew up at once with no warning. As soon as I felt a problem, I backed off and did something else instead; however, I ended up out of the pool very quickly.

Needless to say, I’m S.O.L., because three limbs are far from 100%, eliminating the option of kick or pull sets. Instead, I’m doing my doc’s prescribed “Thrower’s Ten Exercise Program”. Many of those exercises I was already doing to prevent a problem!

Although I had been doing USRPT, I thought I was doing well in my training. I had cut my yardage down after my hip surgery, I built in easy days, I was doing dryland to stay healthy, and I felt GOOD! Just the day before my blow-up, I was getting really excited for National Senior Games and feeling very positive. I also thought I had overcome the physical issues of my past that I believe, in part, had to do with some hereditary auto-immune systemic issues (I AM my father’s daughter!).

Instead, I think it came to kick me in the *&$. In no uncertain terms, my body told me it couldn’t handle my training regimen. My mind was 100% motivated; however, my body said STOP NOW!

So, dear Forumites, for those who actually read this far, I’m at a loss. Staying motivated to get into the pool has never been my problem; it’s learning how to cope when I have to stay out or cut it way too short!

*Elbow injury: I lifted a wood display case by the handle and pulled it up and over another case. I felt a pain in my elbow at the joint, but only to the touch.
**Shoulder injury: The following month, we went to the Dominican Republic and volunteered at a cacao plantation that was part of a women’s co-op chocolate factory. To protect my elbow, I used my non-dominant “healthy” arm to pass small bags of soil (for seedlings) in a “bucket brigade”. Too much repetitive motion caused shoulder pain. Again, it was just sore at the joint, and it didn’t hurt when I swam.

quicksilver
May 23rd, 2017, 07:23 PM
So, dear Forumites, for those who actually read this far, I’m at a loss. Staying motivated to get into the pool has never been my problem; it’s learning how to cope when I have to stay out or cut it way too short!

Sorry to hear Elaine. Overuse and overwork is bound to happen, particularly after many years of activity. It's coincidental that you wrote this thread, because I have not been on the forums for a while, and just happened upon Fortress's blog. It was upsetting to see what she had to go through, and also saddening that she is under a forced (yet hopefully) temporary retirement.

It's interesting how the typical high school and collage career lasts a very short eight years, yet we as masters swimmers will do our best to keep at it for as long as possible. Ten, twenty, even thirty years for many.

I think to answer your question, it's best to have balance, and an interest outside of the pool, which keeps you motivated, happy, and healthy. In the long run, the benefit of being fit at another form of activity will offset the potential for injury, and in some cases can even compliment your ability to stay competitive. Too many swimmers just swim, swim, swim and not much else...and it's perhaps only a matter of time until something starts grinding or popping.

There's not really an answer other than it's ok to take a year or two off from going to meets if that's what's needed. The pool won't be going anywhere, and the rest from pounding on oneself to be competitive can be a good thing. ...Maybe work hard while you're a youngster in your age group...and then back down a little until you age up again?

BettyL
May 23rd, 2017, 08:21 PM
Ahhh Elaine! I was looking forward to meeting you at the National Senior Games. When I'm struggling with my motivation during my solo practices, I think of all your inspiring words and positivity. I'm always impressed with your upbeat comments on this forum and your real passion for swimming. I think at our age we demand a lot from our bodies which can't keep up with our young hearts and minds. I hope you get back in the pink ( and the pool) soon.

Allen Stark
May 23rd, 2017, 08:25 PM
I am so sorry. One problem I have found is that if I try to ignore a problem, it not only gets worse, but it throws something else out of wack. It is very hard for me to listen to my body when I don't like what it is saying. Right now my R knee hurts if I do BR kick. I am trying to come up with workarounds for that, not much success. At least I can still swim. Your ailments are so much more extensive. I think the only solution is lots and lots of chocolate. I am also very sorry to hear about Fort's injuries,wow.

ElaineK
May 23rd, 2017, 09:59 PM
Sorry to hear Elaine. Overuse and overwork is bound to happen, particularly after many years of activity. It's coincidental that you wrote this thread, because I have not been on the forums for a while, and just happened upon Fortress's blog. It was upsetting to see what she had to go through, and also saddening that she is under a forced (yet hopefully) temporary retirement.

It's interesting how the typical high school and collage career lasts a very short eight years, yet we as masters swimmers will do our best to keep at it for as long as possible. Ten, twenty, even thirty years for many.

I think to answer your question, it's best to have balance, and an interest outside of the pool, which keeps you motivated, happy, and healthy. In the long run, the benefit of being fit at another form of activity will offset the potential for injury, and in some cases can even compliment your ability to stay competitive. Too many swimmers just swim, swim, swim and not much else...and it's perhaps only a matter of time until something starts grinding or popping.

There's not really an answer other than it's ok to take a year or two off from going to meets if that's what's needed. The pool won't be going anywhere, and the rest from pounding on oneself to be competitive can be a good thing. ...Maybe work hard while you're a youngster in your age group...and then back down a little until you age up again?

You bring up some good points, 'Silver; thank you. Unfortunately, I am the youngster in my age group (55-59), and I had backed down prior to aging up! 2015 was a recovery year after my surgery, and 2016 was a rebuild year to prepare for aging up!


Ahhh Elaine! I was looking forward to meeting you at the National Senior Games. When I'm struggling with my motivation during my solo practices, I think of all your inspiring words and positivity. I'm always impressed with your upbeat comments on this forum and your real passion for swimming. I think at our age we demand a lot from our bodies which can't keep up with our young hearts and minds. I hope you get back in the pink ( and the pool) soon.

What a sweet message, Betty! I really appreciate your kind words, and I'm happy to hear my words inspired you. Thanks for making my day!


I am so sorry. One problem I have found is that if I try to ignore a problem, it not only gets worse, but it throws something else out of wack. It is very hard for me to listen to my body when I don't like what it is saying. Right now my R knee hurts if I do BR kick. I am trying to come up with workarounds for that, not much success. At least I can still swim. Your ailments are so much more extensive. I think the only solution is lots and lots of chocolate. I am also very sorry to hear about Fort's injuries,wow.

Thanks, King Frog! I'm sorry to hear about your knee. Now that you know about it, keep listening! At least you had more of a warning than I had.

Although I love your solution, I'm backing off that, too, so I don't get fat!

As for Fort, I was unaware of her injuries. I'm sorry, too. I think I'll check out her blog and see what happened.

ElaineK
May 23rd, 2017, 10:12 PM
Wow, I just read Fort's blog, and I know EXACTLY what she was talking about regarding her condition. In 2003, I had a first rib resection for thoracic outlet syndrome that affected my veins AND nerves. It is very rare, as she said. Between that, having Raynaud's in my toes, and having tarsal tunnel syndrome; those are a few of the "rare" medical issues that have struck me.

Fort, if you are still on the Forums, I am so very sorry! :bighug:

67King
May 24th, 2017, 10:12 AM
So sorry to read this. I hope you can find a way to recover, and get back in quickly, but not too soon. Big set backs seem to be inevitable in activities we do for a long time, just don't let it become permanent (happened to me twice).

Anyone have a link to the blog referenced?

ElaineK
May 24th, 2017, 07:23 PM
So sorry to read this. I hope you can find a way to recover, and get back in quickly, but not too soon. Big set backs seem to be inevitable in activities we do for a long time, just don't let it become permanent (happened to me twice).

Anyone have a link to the blog referenced?

Thanks, 67. The link for Fort's blog is here (http://forums.usms.org/blog.php?4677-The-Fortress).

cinc3100
May 25th, 2017, 12:57 AM
Happen to my leg. Got possium from doctor and did more pulling for a month. I'm able to kick again.

cinc3100
May 25th, 2017, 12:58 AM
At our ages, we need to sometimes swim slower in practice until we feel better. I get lap swimmers that say I have a good fly, but the pace clock times don't say so

Dan Kornblatt
May 25th, 2017, 12:25 PM
Thanks, 67. The link for Fort's blog is here (http://forums.usms.org/blog.php?4677-The-Fortress).

So sorry to hear about your set back. I would like to send to a note to your personal e-mail. Mine is dannyswims@aol.com and I will return answer to you. Thanks, Dan

aholloway1982
May 25th, 2017, 02:17 PM
Unfortunately, wile I don't know what happened with the hip, your body did try to warn you about your shoulder and elbow and you didn't listen as well as you thought. It's not normal for a shoulder to hurt when you lay on it or to have joint pain, nor is it normal for an elbow to be sore to the touch, especially when either problem didn't clear up after a few days of taking it easy on them. That's when you should have gone to the doctor. We all have newer aches and pains as we get older, but none of what you describe should simply be lived with as part of the aging process. Sorry this has happened to you, and now that you know what is going on, hoping you have a quick and uncomplicated recovery!

gull
May 25th, 2017, 02:29 PM
Check out this link regarding your elbow:

http://drjuliansaunders.com/dodgy-elbows/

And you should consider deep tissue massage. Just a thought.

ElaineK
May 25th, 2017, 03:55 PM
So sorry to hear about your set back. I would like to send to a note to your personal e-mail. Mine is dannyswims@aol.com and I will return answer to you. Thanks, Dan

Thanks for your insightful e-mail, Dan. I appreciated it very much, and I wrote you a (too long!) message back. :blush:


Unfortunately, wile I don't know what happened with the hip, your body did try to warn you about your shoulder and elbow and you didn't listen as well as you thought. It's not normal for a shoulder to hurt when you lay on it or to have joint pain, nor is it normal for an elbow to be sore to the touch, especially when either problem didn't clear up after a few days of taking it easy on them. That's when you should have gone to the doctor. We all have newer aches and pains as we get older, but none of what you describe should simply be lived with as part of the aging process. Sorry this has happened to you, and now that you know what is going on, hoping you have a quick and uncomplicated recovery!

As they say, hindsight is 20-20. I know that now, but it didn't occur to me at the time. I felt fine in the pool; none of my aches and pains affected my swimming. As soon as it did, I went to get them checked out. My big mistake was going to the chiropractor I was referred to by another swimmer, rather than seeing my orthopaedic guy who I completely trust.

Another reason I didn't go sooner was because of this: If I went to the doctor for every one of my aches and pains, I would be labeled a hypochondriac, and I would go broke! You have no idea how many times I have gone to "respected" and "top" doctors over the years and was sent away without a diagnosis-- or have been basically told it was all in my head. (I never went back to those doctors.) Past "all in my head" pains ultimately led to emergency back surgery for a disc that fragmented in my spinal column and first rib resection for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS- neurological and venous, the rarest combo).

Thank goodness that my current orthopaedic surgeon (who was a fellow under James Andrews) took me seriously and actually listened to me when I had severe hip pain. The MRI and myelogram showed nothing; however, when he went in with a scope to do a psoas (hip flexor) release, he found a labral tear that hadn't shown up in diagnostics. He says now that I've probably aggravated the scar tissue (again), and it will get better (again) with rest.

Thanks for the good wishing-- after the lashing. ;)


Check out this link regarding your elbow:

http://drjuliansaunders.com/dodgy-elbows/

And you should consider deep tissue massage. Just a thought.

Thanks for the link, Gull; I'll check it out. In addition to my foam roller self-massages, deep tissue massage is a good suggestion. Thanks!

ElaineK
May 25th, 2017, 04:12 PM
Check out this link regarding your elbow:

http://drjuliansaunders.com/dodgy-elbows/

And you should consider deep tissue massage. Just a thought.

Excellent article. For now, my ortho has me resting my elbow and doing this (http://www.muhlenberg.edu/pdf/main/athletics/athletic_training/throwers10.pdf) program for my shoulder.

gull
May 25th, 2017, 04:27 PM
Excellent article. For now, my ortho has me resting my elbow and doing this (http://www.muhlenberg.edu/pdf/main/athletics/athletic_training/throwers10.pdf) program for my shoulder.

I have been doing rotator cuff exercises with bands for years. They are very effective. But I was impressed with how much deep tissue massage helped me recently in the setting of acute inflammation in one of my shoulders. After a few sessions I was swimming without pain again.

Periodically (and without any precipitating event) I will experience a bout of medial epicondylitis, a common overuse injury, which is how I discovered Dr. Saunders's website. There is also a simple exercise that another forum member posted here a few years back which is very effective:

"Here is a rehab movement that I use to try to avoid or address this condition. It is a technique that was developed many years ago by someone who used to swim on the Masters Swim team I coach. I think it is called "Active Release" or something like that. He is now independently wealthy (he has his own private jet and a Viper race car) from teaching and using this technique on lots of professional athletes. I will try to describe the motion - please let me know if this does not make sense and I will try to describe it better. This will be if your right elbow hurts.

I start with my right elbow bent at 90 degrees with my right hand pointing to the left, my right arm is in front of my belly button (palm facing either down or towards me). My left hand is grasping the top of my right forearm with my left thumb pressing about 2-3 inches from the medial epicondyle along the tendon. I straighten my right arm, rotating my right hand so that it is now palm up, thumb pointing to the right. While I an straightening my arm and rotating my hand I slowly press firmly with my left thumb along the tendon moving towards the medial epicondyle. I repeat this several times.

This has worked for me many times. I have also shown several swimmers how to do this and it works for them. The theory behind Active Release is that there are supposedly micro scars in the tendon that prevent things from sliding the way they are supposed to. The motion and pressing "breaks up" these micro scars. Whether this is true or not I have no idea. I got this condition from carrying our kids when they were very little on my arm (elbow touching my body), arm extended like a seat). I also got it once from doing too much breaststroke pulling with paddles. Both times this seemed to clear it up. I now do this motion to prevent any new injury. Let me know if it works. Good luck!"


http://youtu.be/mMxZXVYHUm8

ElaineK
May 25th, 2017, 06:50 PM
Interesting- thanks! Do you know how to do self-active release for lateral edicondyle (tennis elbow)? This is the problem I have with my elbow. I see there are videos on this; however, I'm not sure which one is best. Thanks!

ganache
May 25th, 2017, 10:21 PM
Hi Elaine,

I'm the one who posted that video a while back in response to a post by Gull. To do the lateral epicondyle, just mimic that same thing but push with your thumb from mid forearm along the muscle/tendon to the tendon attachment (the little bump that hurts) as you straighten your elbow. Start with your elbow bent. Then slowly massage your thumb along the muscle/tendon to the lateral epicondyle as you straighten your arm.

ElaineK
May 26th, 2017, 12:52 PM
Hi Elaine,

I'm the one who posted that video a while back in response to a post by Gull. To do the lateral epicondyle, just mimic that same thing but push with your thumb from mid forearm along the muscle/tendon to the tendon attachment (the little bump that hurts) as you straighten your elbow. Start with your elbow bent. Then slowly massage your thumb along the muscle/tendon to the lateral epicondyle as you straighten your arm.

Thanks, ganache! :D I'll give it a try. How many reps would you recommend?

Meanwhile, I found one for the shoulder. What do you think?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ig7lrvzARSM

ganache
May 26th, 2017, 08:18 PM
Hi Elaine,

I would recommend doing several times (5-6) 3 times a day. Often when I am sitting in a meeting at work I'll do a few of these on my medial epicondyles. I do the same shoulder exercise but using a 5-lb dumbbell and lying on my right side for my left arm and lying on my right side for my left arm. I would recommend starting with a 1-2 lb weight (can even use a can of fruit or vegetables). These are some of the rehab exercises I now do on a regular basis to try to avoid shoulder injuries.

ElaineK
May 26th, 2017, 08:30 PM
Hi Elaine,

I would recommend doing several times (5-6) 3 times a day. Often when I am sitting in a meeting at work I'll do a few of these on my medial epicondyles. I do the same shoulder exercise but using a 5-lb dumbbell and lying on my right side for my left arm and lying on my right side for my left arm. I would recommend starting with a 1-2 lb weight (can even use a can of fruit or vegetables). These are some of the rehab exercises I now do on a regular basis to try to avoid shoulder injuries.

Thanks for the recommendation. I'll add it to my daily dryland "To Do" list. I, too, did a PT routine of exercises (some with Theraband) to avoid shoulder injuries and future hip injuries; however, I evidently did too much of everything before my body shut down.

DanDumee1
June 2nd, 2017, 02:00 PM
I'm sorry to hear that..

You'll never know when your body would act up. To prevent it from happening, I seldom push myself to my limit, striking a balance between getting exercise and having enough rest.

ElaineK
June 2nd, 2017, 06:10 PM
I'm sorry to hear that..

You'll never know when your body would act up. To prevent it from happening, I seldom push myself to my limit, striking a balance between getting exercise and having enough rest.

Thanks, Dan. I love the challenge of training hard and competing at the best of my ability; however, my body has told me one to many times that it doesn't like that approach to swimming as much as I do. :bouncing: I was making times I hadn't hit in four years, but it just wasn't worth it. :shakeshead: (Of course, hindsight is 20-20. If I had known my body would break down again, I would have approached swimming the way you do!)

Hey, Dan, off the subject, assuming you live in Stockholm, Sweden, I love your beautiful city and country! :agree:

cinc3100
June 2nd, 2017, 09:46 PM
Thanks, Dan. I love the challenge of training hard and competing at the best of my ability; however, my body has told me one to many times that it doesn't like that approach to swimming as much as I do. :bouncing: I was making times I hadn't hit in four years, but it just wasn't worth it. :shakeshead: (Of course, hindsight is 20-20. If I had known my body would break down again, I would have approached swimming the way you do!)

Hey, Dan, off the subject, assuming you live in Stockholm, Sweden, I love your beautiful city and country! :agree:

Well, I don't do 10,000 to 15,000 yards a week, like some masters swimmers. I usually swim under 2,000 yards a day 4 to 6 times a week. I do I'm stuff more than just all breast or free. I do like kicking breast and fly more than free since I get more craps if I kick free more.

ElaineK
June 2nd, 2017, 10:45 PM
Well, I don't do 10,000 to 15,000 yards a week, like some masters swimmers. I usually swim under 2,000 yards a day 4 to 6 times a week. I do I'm stuff more than just all breast or free. I do like kicking breast and fly more than free since I get more craps if I kick free more.

I was averaging 2,500 yards per day, six days per week; however, I take time off when I travel (which is often). I took one week off in January, another in March, and one in April (all for travel). For many Masters swimmers, that mileage isn't considered too much.

In addition, I train all four strokes for 400 IM. Knowing breaststroke kick was tough on my hip, I never trained breaststroke two days in a row. I always mixed things up with my strokes. When I completed a USRP set, I switched strokes and did drills.

In other words, it wasn't like I was abusing my body. I did dynamic stretching before I got in the pool, and I always warmed up properly. After my workouts, I hit the deck for PT exercises and yoga to prevent future injuries. I consulted with coaches, consulted with my Forumite mentors (especially King Frog!), had my strokes constantly analyzed to death, and did everything by the book (and Swimmer Magazine, and Go Swim videos, and Total Immersion videos, and... I think I made my point).

I have a history of auto-immune issues and soft tissue, repetitive stress injuries. I thought I was past it all, because I was feeling so strong and doing very well (for me) in the pool. This blow-up of three limbs all at once was a wake-up call, for sure.

My word of warning to other 50+ swimmers (I'm 55): If you have had past medical issues that you think you have beaten, please understand that they may come back to haunt you when you least expect it, without warning. We are all at the age now where #@$* happens. Unless you are the amazing Laura Val who defies the laws of aging, your body will let you know you're not a kid any more, even if you feel half your age (like I do when I'm on top of my game).

I will catch a lot of crap for saying this, I'm sure, but USRPT is only appropriate for those like the Glenn Grubers and Laura Vals of the world who seem to have bodies half of their biological age. Does USRPT work? Heck yeah! Did I love it while I was able to train those sets? For sure! I loved the challenge, I loved the success I was achieving, and I felt on top of the world when I was able to nail my USRPT sets of fly or breaststroke. It was awesome-- until it wasn't. I believe it was those sets that over-stressed my body, even if I wasn't feeling any warning signs from it. One day I felt great, and the next day, my body broke down. Now, I'm having to do my PT exercises and just cruise in the pool, doing my finger tip drag drill with a light kick for 1,000 yards/day until I heal up-- again.

Those days of USRPT and any other high-intensity training are OVER.

cinc3100
June 2nd, 2017, 11:04 PM
I was averaging 2,500 yards per day, six days per week; however, I take time off when I travel (which is often). I took one week off in January, another in March, and one in April (all for travel). For many Masters swimmers, that mileage isn't considered too much.

In addition, I train all four strokes for 400 IM. Knowing breaststroke kick was tough on my hip, I never trained breaststroke two days in a row. I always mixed things up with my strokes. When I completed a USRP set, I switched strokes and did drills.

In other words, it wasn't like I was abusing my body. I did dynamic stretching before I got in the pool, and I always warmed up properly. After my workouts, I hit the deck for PT exercises and yoga to prevent future injuries. I consulted with coaches, consulted with my Forumite mentors (especially King Frog!), had my strokes constantly analyzed to death, and did everything by the book (and Swimmer Magazine, and Go Swim videos, and Total Immersion videos, and... I think I made my point).

I have a history of auto-immune issues and soft tissue, repetitive stress injuries. I thought I was past it all, because I was feeling so strong and doing very well (for me) in the pool. This blow-up of three limbs all at once was a wake-up call, for sure.

My word of warning to other 50+ swimmers (I'm 55): If you have had past medical issues that you think you have beaten, please understand that they may come back to haunt you when you least expect it, without warning. We are all at the age now where #@$* happens. Unless you are the amazing Laura Val who defies the laws of aging, your body will let you know you're not a kid any more, even if you feel half your age (like I do when I'm on top of my game).

I will catch a lot of crap for saying this, I'm sure, but USRPT is only appropriate for those like the Glenn Grubers and Laura Vals of the world who seem to have bodies half of their biological age. Does USRPT work? Heck yeah! Did I love it while I was able to train those sets? For sure! I loved the challenge, I loved the success I was achieving, and I felt on top of the world when I was able to nail my USRPT sets of fly or breaststroke. It was awesome-- until it wasn't. I believe it was those sets that over-stressed my body, even if I wasn't feeling any warning signs from it. One day I felt great, and the next day, my body broke down. Now, I'm having to do my PT exercises and just cruise in the pool, doing my finger tip drag drill with a light kick for 1,000 yards/day until I heal up-- again.

Those days of USRPT and any other high-intensity training are OVER.

Well, I know that I'm far from Melinda Mann and Collete Crabbe in the 60-64 age group. Crabbe swam in the Olympics for Beligium in 1976 and defeated Shane Gould at a masters meet in the 200 I'm. We just have to enjoy the swimming and try different things.

cinc3100
June 13th, 2017, 11:43 PM
Ahhh Elaine! I was looking forward to meeting you at the National Senior Games. When I'm struggling with my motivation during my solo practices, I think of all your inspiring words and positivity. I'm always impressed with your upbeat comments on this forum and your real passion for swimming. I think at our age we demand a lot from our bodies which can't keep up with our young hearts and minds. I hope you get back in the pink ( and the pool) soon. Good job at national senior olympics Betty, I saw your times.

BettyL
June 14th, 2017, 06:32 PM
Hey thanks cinc3100! It was really fun! My first national games, but I think I'm hooked now!
I met so many nice people I hope to see again.

ElaineK
June 14th, 2017, 09:30 PM
Hey thanks cinc3100! It was really fun! My first national games, but I think I'm hooked now!
I met so many nice people I hope to see again.

I'm glad it was such a great experience for you, Betty. I'm sorry I wasn't there to cheer you on! See you in two years? I wonder where it will be...

BettyL
June 15th, 2017, 06:32 AM
Albuquerque, New Mexico

ElaineK
June 15th, 2017, 07:24 PM
Albuquerque, New Mexico

Cool, thanks! Santa Fe and Taos are worth a visit while you're there (if you are going). I photographed the Albuquerque Hot Air Balloon Fiesta five years in a row and always had a great time out there.

Silly me; I could have Googled it earlier! Here it is: https://www.cabq.gov/mayor/news/albuquerque-to-host-the-2019-national-senior-games

ElaineK
July 6th, 2017, 05:22 PM
It's now July, and it has been over two months since my body took a dump on me. I've been very diligent about doing the PT exercises I was prescribed as well as everything posted above. In addition, DeniseMW recommended I check out the McKenzie Method, so I watched every video I could find on YouTube. I also picked up McKenzie's "Treat Your Own Shoulder" (https://www.amazon.com/Treat-Your-Own-Shoulder-805/dp/097998808X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1499375867&sr=8-1&keywords=treat+your+own+shoulder+by+robin+mckenzie ) on Amazon, and I do the exercises daily.

Fortunately, I have mostly recovered-- perhaps about 80%. I saw my doctor at the end of June and received a positive report. He says he still wants me to lay off full butterfly and backstroke for awhile longer; however, I'm back to swimming a little bit of 200-pace breaststroke, and my freestyle is OK at distance pace.

Although I missed the National Senior Games and I'm not going to compete at Nationals, I am going to swim the 1K at the Georgia State Games Open Water Meet this weekend. (I usually swim the 3K and 1K; however, I'm not there yet!) I won't be able to full-on race, but I've done some practice swims in the pool, and I'm fine at 75% effort.

It has been tough (both physically and mentally), and I am now at the same place King Frog is with training. Both of us have long-term goals to keep swimming for the long haul-- and, hopefully swim into our 100's! We both know that the only way to do that is to avoid body-breaking training methods.

For me, I am still very unsure what my body will be able to handle in the future, and I am fearful of injuries-- especially since they almost always come without warning.

The important thing for me is that I won't need surgery, my doctor is pleased with my progress, and I am very thankful I can swim! :bliss:

Allen Stark
July 6th, 2017, 08:14 PM
So glad you are back in the water. :applaud:75% is much better than 0.:bouncing: Just keep at it.:cane: Enjoy the water.:banana:

ElaineK
July 6th, 2017, 09:21 PM
So glad you are back in the water. :applaud:75% is much better than 0.:bouncing: Just keep at it.:cane: Enjoy the water.:banana:

:D Smilies, and lots of 'em. You croak my language, King Frog! :ohyeah:

Thanks, buddy. It's nice to be back in the pond. :chug:

cinc3100
July 7th, 2017, 10:54 PM
:D Smilies, and lot of 'em. You croak my language, King Frog! :ohyeah:

Thanks, buddy. It's nice to be back in the pond. :chug: Started to use the LA Fitness pool its 25 meters with less lanes/ Well use it more in winter time.

f1refl1es!
July 30th, 2017, 07:28 PM
In other words, it wasn't like I was abusing my body. I did dynamic stretching before I got in the pool, and I always warmed up properly. After my workouts, I hit the deck for PT exercises and yoga to prevent future injuries. I consulted with coaches, consulted with my Forumite mentors (especially King Frog!), had my strokes constantly analyzed to death, and did everything by the book (and Swimmer Magazine, and Go Swim videos, and Total Immersion videos, and... I think I made my point).

I have a history of auto-immune issues and soft tissue, repetitive stress injuries. I thought I was past it all, because I was feeling so strong and doing very well (for me) in the pool. This blow-up of three limbs all at once was a wake-up call, for sure.

My word of warning to other 50+ swimmers (I'm 55): If you have had past medical issues that you think you have beaten, please understand that they may come back to haunt you when you least expect it, without warning. We are all at the age now where #@$* happens. Unless you are the amazing Laura Val who defies the laws of aging, your body will let you know you're not a kid any more, even if you feel half your age (like I do when I'm on top of my game).



Good sage advice I think! Glad you're feeling better, swimming better Elaine! You mentioned a good many therapeutic modalities but, I noticed no mention of diet or supplements. I don't mean to come off like some kind of MLM person or anything -- especially as new as I am to the forums! -- but have you looked at natural anti-inflammatories like dark greens, fish, in your diet? I also find that if I notice early on that I have overdone it with physical efforts, the herb, Boswellia, in capsule form, can work magic to soothe the aches. I'm always mindful, if I take some Boswellia, that I can't go out and further exert the same muscles. It just helps me sleep more soundly, so I am well-rested. If I am achy, I just can't usually get to sleep.

The SwimSwam article I found by googling USRPT (I am a newbie and had no clue!), says no land-based strength training. Wow, that seems kind of silly, to me. I think, especially for Masters, who may not have always stayed very physically active, some strength training would be an absolute necessity. Well, I don't have to really worry much about USRPT now for some time. I have a lot yet to learn, just go get to proficiency!!

ElaineK
July 30th, 2017, 08:56 PM
Good sage advice I think! Glad you're feeling better, swimming better Elaine! You mentioned a good many therapeutic modalities but, I noticed no mention of diet or supplements. I don't mean to come off like some kind of MLM person or anything -- especially as new as I am to the forums! -- but have you looked at natural anti-inflammatories like dark greens, fish, in your diet? I also find that if I notice early on that I have overdone it with physical efforts, the herb, Boswellia, in capsule form, can work magic to soothe the aches. I'm always mindful, if I take some Boswellia, that I can't go out and further exert the same muscles. It just helps me sleep more soundly, so I am well-rested. If I am achy, I just can't usually get to sleep.

The SwimSwam article I found by googling USRPT (I am a newbie and had no clue!), says no land-based strength training. Wow, that seems kind of silly, to me. I think, especially for Masters, who may not have always stayed very physically active, some strength training would be an absolute necessity. Well, I don't have to really worry much about USRPT now for some time. I have a lot yet to learn, just go get to proficiency!!

Thanks, f1re!

Hmmm, now that you mention it, I didn't mention diet or supplements-- in this tread. I have talked about it in other threads when other swimmers have asked for :2cents:. As a matter of fact, your enemy :D, mmlr38 (Look at his avatar photo, and you will know what I mean!), recommended a book, Forks Over Knives (https://www.amazon.com/Forks-Over-Knives-Plan-Life-Saving/dp/147675330X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1501461463&sr=8-2&keywords=forks+over+knives) :dinner: that I really like and use regularly. Although my husband and I previously had an excellent diet, we have transitioned to a whole-food, plant-based diet most of the time. All bets are off when it comes to salmon, shrimp, and other seafood, though! We do incorporate seafood in our diet a couple of times each week, because we like it too much to give up. Same goes for traveling; all bets are off. We ease up on the restrictions, especially when we travel internationally and want to experience different cuisines.

Regarding supplements, I take a multi-vitamin as well as extra calcium, magnesium, and Vitamin D-- nothing fancy; I buy "Kirkland" supplements from Costco.

Have you read about the benefits of tart cherry juice? I was intrigued by what I read, so I added it to my diet as well.

I've never heard of Boswellia, so I'll check it out...

Thanks!