PDA

View Full Version : My Great first Day at Olympic trials !!!!



breastroker
July 7th, 2004, 11:22 PM
I had a good seat just above the finish line, but up high.
Prelims the weather was nice overcast. Some good swims in prelims indicated the best races would be the mens 400 free, and it was.

Prelims ended at 11 am, sat down to lunch, and who sets down next to me? Just the best looking and one of the greatest women swimmers ever, DARA Torres. Still looking like she could beat the other women, and still beautiful. She swam in the 1984, 88, 92 and 2000 Olympics!!!! Made my day, the first time I saw her was in 1988 and she lit up the airport with her smile.

Then had a drink with Mo Chambers and her husband. Mo writes the great workouts and is one of the woderful masters coaches and people we have.

Then the first event, WOW 4:08.41 by Michael Phelps
Splits:
Fly 55.66
Back 1:02.19
Breast 1:12.90 (great split)
Free 57.66

Some good swims in the womens 100 fly prelims, took 59 seconds to make the finals.


Then the best race of the night, mens 400 free, Keller in 3:44.19
beating Phelps american record by almost two seconds. And the kid from Mission Viejo swam a great 4:46

This was the USAs worst event for the last 3 Olympics, but if the Torpedo has a poor day Klete will be there.

Then a 15 year old girl broke Summer Sanders american record in the 400 IM with a very good 4:37

Mens 100 breast semi finals were good, Hansen swam an American record 1:00.19 and looked good. Moses did not look good, so my prediction of Hansen in 59+

Of course I always look like a cooked lobster at these meets, darn Scottish background I never tan. At least I used sun tan lotion:D

MegSmath
July 8th, 2004, 09:29 AM
Thanks for the first-hand report, Wayne! Keep 'em coming!

Meg

DocWhoRocks
July 8th, 2004, 09:52 AM
Originally posted by breastroker
Mens 100 breast semi finals were good, Hansen swam an American record 1:00.19 and looked good. Moses did not look good, so my prediction of Hansen in 59+

I really hope Scott Usher makes it in the 100 breast - GO WYOMING!!!! :D

nyswim
July 8th, 2004, 10:03 AM
wouldn't surprise me one bit if Moses did make the team in 100BR

dcarson
July 8th, 2004, 10:34 AM
I can 2nd Wayne's enthusiasm that it is awesome being here to watch the trials. I'm lucky to have my hotel room on the same floor with some of the Olympic greats. There's definitely a lot of excitement in the air and so much anticipation. This beats going to work!

The following link is to a press group here that is covering the trials and issuing daily newspapers on the trials. The link should give some of the same info. they are putting in print on the events.

http://www.presstelegram.com/olympics

Dan

Sabretooth Tiger
July 8th, 2004, 01:40 PM
I'm glad Wayne is enjoying the meet. I was there for the morning sessions but sadly missed Phelp's world record that evening.

In following the results though, I think Summer Sanders' American record in the 400 IM remains in tact for now. Here is an exerpt from an article on MSNBC:

"In the women’s 400 medley, 15-year-old Katie Hoff swam the second-fastest time in American history, 4:37.67. She tired a bit on the final freestyle leg, just missing Summer Sanders’ 12-year-old national record of 4:37.58."

This comports with the results I read on the net.

Wayne, would love to meet you or any other masters out there. I'll be in section 11, row 15 tomorrow morning with other Rose Bowl masters and our friends.

knelson
July 8th, 2004, 02:21 PM
Pretty impressives swims this morning by the ladies in the 100 breast, including a 1:07 low by Stitts! Can't wait to see how that event pans out.

It looks like Crocker DQed in the 200 free. I'm assuming a false start?

Also Diana Munz qualified 9th in the 400 free, so she's out for tonight barring a scratch.

susanehr
July 8th, 2004, 02:43 PM
We in Kentucky are a little surprized at the lack of press on Rachel Komisarz. Why should we care? She does hold a few Masters Records!!She may just sneak in to the Olympics in an individual event (or two). For those of you fortunate enough to see the events live, give her a big yell from SKY (Swim Kentucky Masters).

croberts
July 8th, 2004, 02:46 PM
Originally posted by knelson
It looks like Crocker DQed in the 200 free. I'm assuming a false start?

Not quite. It looks like a declared false start. He decided not to swim, forgot to scratch and didn't want to incur any penalties. Most likely cleared this with the referee before his swim.

Sam Perry
July 8th, 2004, 02:57 PM
FYI,

For anyone in Long Beach there is a masters group working out in the mornings at Belmont Pool. They set up a workout with various coaches from 5:30 AM to 7:00 AM. Went this morning and it was great seeing old friends and meeting new folks. $2.00 gets you in the door.

dcarson
July 8th, 2004, 04:47 PM
Susan - Absolutely agree ref. press on Rachel Komisarz, as well as press on some of the other greats. Rachel did great this morning in prelims. At the trials there is a daily newspaper on the events that is showcasing many swimmers. Phelps of course is the lead stories, but they have many other swimmers profiled and newsbits about them.

It's interesting that the sponsors tents at the trials has Phelps everywhere. I know he must be the most promotable right now, but it would be nice to see recognition of some of the other greats. Today it was awesome to see Brooke Bennett, Lenny Krayzelburg, Josh Davis and Neil Walker swim in prelims.

Peter Cruise
July 8th, 2004, 06:44 PM
Wayne- are you seeing some unification of breastroke technique, or are many differences being displayed?

Conniekat8
July 8th, 2004, 09:21 PM
Hi Wayne!
I'm glad you're having Fun :)
I'll be there Friday (Tomorrow) hope to see you there.

breastroker
July 9th, 2004, 12:16 AM
Connie,
Are you going to sit with the rest of the Mission Viejo gang, section 8 ? I am in section 7, row 32 directly above the end of the red lane lines on the start and finish end.

I was sitting with the Hansen clan, before I said someone needed to take the first 50 of the breast out hard, below 28 seconds. Brenden went out in 27.93 on the way to a new world record!!!! Ed Moses looked horrible, went out in 29.09 and finished up 3 seconds behind.

I think Brenden Hansen will do the USA proud, he is not a choker and will help the medley relay.

Of the womens breaststroke, Stacianna Stitts has the best stroke by far, and should win the final.



are you seeing some unification of breastroke technique, or are many Yes, both the men and women (except Amanda) swim with their heads looking down, but to my horror they are all doing the track start. I don't think in two days I have seen more than one 2 foot grab start. Which means we will be starting at a disadvantage at the Olympics!


For you fans of Rachel Komisarz, she WON!!!!!!!
Komisarz, a sometime Masters swimmer Komisarz touched in a pr 58.77, while veteran Jenny Thompson, 31, the leader most of the race, hung on for second in 58.98

ced357
July 9th, 2004, 01:11 AM
Breaststroker, why would it be a disadvantage to utilize the track start in Athens?

breastroker
July 9th, 2004, 09:32 AM
I watched the starts during warm up, the average woman went 9 feet, man 10-11 feet from the starting blocks. A good two footed grab start can get 13-14 feet off the starting block. That will reduce your time to 15 meters by 0.2 to 0.4 seconds.

The rest of the world does the grab start, they want to win!

knelson
July 9th, 2004, 10:10 AM
I would think the reaction time would be slower for a track start, too. Most people who use it seem to rock back slightly. Then when the horn sounds they need to rock back forward before they can leave the block. It doesn't seem like you get more power, either. So unless you're prone to false starting, I don't see the advantage.

<<< I guess you can see by my avatar I use a grab start :)

jasoneaddy
July 9th, 2004, 10:32 AM
I may be mistaken here, Kirk, but I believe that people leaning back in the track start aren't quite doing it right. Your weight should be primarily over your front foot, as close to the front edge of the block as possible. I'm just speculating here, but because the back leg is already partially extended, the muscles can start the body forward sooner than during a grab start. This could lead to faster reaction times. Here's a paper that points out the faster reaction times at the Sydney Olympics: http://www.technion.ac.il/~olegbm/paper_18.pdf

My experience, switching to a track start this year after 20+ years of a grab start, has undoubtedly been positive. I just dropped about 6 tenths off my 100 fly and I'm sure that at least a tenth or two came from the different start.

Just my $.02 on the subject,
Jason

mattson
July 9th, 2004, 10:35 AM
I remember in another thread, someone posted a link to a study that showed no advantage for either grab or track start out to 15m. (Advantages of each balanced out over the phases of the start and glide.) Could someone repost that?

One of my coaches snarls at people who lean or rock back on their track starts. Much as he would snarl at somone who does an arm wind-up during their grab start. :D

I prefer a track start, because it is difficult (for me) to get my center-of-mass, from balanced to in front of my legs, quickly. I can do that with an arm pull and a back leg pushoff. I try to hold the start leaning as far forward as possible (while still stable).

(Edit: I didn't see Jason's response before I posted. But I did find the link I was looking for- http://www.coachesinfo.com/category/swimming/88 )

valhallan
July 9th, 2004, 10:51 AM
The track starters don't actually grab the blocks. They keep the hands open with the palms flat on the edge of the blocks. When the signal goes off they push with their hands. Unlike a traditional grab start which requires a split second release before pushing.

Traditional grab starters will say that two legs are stronger than one. But it seems like more and more of the sprint racers are using track starts. I may be wrong about this but the data Jason posted is pretty convincing.

knelson
July 9th, 2004, 11:16 AM
The results are interesting, but the authors' discussion isn't very good. They talk about which events showed significant advantages for the TS, based on the study data, and these events don't seem to agree with the table data.

Also, why even bother comparing reaction times? The only thing that should really matter is which start gets you out to the 15 meter mark faster.

Howard
July 9th, 2004, 01:18 PM
Originally posted by breastroker
I watched the starts during warm up, the average woman went 9 feet, man 10-11 feet from the starting blocks. A good two footed grab start can get 13-14 feet off the starting block. That will reduce your time to 15 meters by 0.2 to 0.4 seconds.

The rest of the world does the grab start, they want to win!

and the US doesn't want to win?

laineybug
July 9th, 2004, 02:10 PM
I read somewhere that the track start gets you off the block quicker BUT you tend not to get the distance that you get with the grab start. Can't remember where I read that, but the author thought moving through the air/distance was more important that getting off the block faster.

jasoneaddy
July 9th, 2004, 06:07 PM
Obviously this topic still up for debate. Martin Hull, aka Mr. Zoomers, has posted his thoughts on the two types of dives. http://www.zoomers.net/new-bestdive.htm His basic opinion is that a track start gets off the block quicker, but the extra oomph from having both feet forward makes the grab start a better alternative. In the end, it's really a personal preference.

As a word of advice for anyone changing their start, make sure you practice with a racing configuration, i.e. cap, same goggles, etc before the meet. The first time I tried a track start at a meet, Rick had a good laugh watching me trying to chew a pair of googles in the fly leg of an IM.

breastroker
July 9th, 2004, 11:35 PM
Howard,
The US coaches are a bunch of Lemmings, and for the most part do not study sports science to determine the best aproaches to swimming. Just today I wrote a 5 page article for publication of what has gone wrong with US coaching and the track start. Bottom line our coaches tend to copy success without looking at the whole picture. Gary Hall Jr and Anthony Ervins win ( 50 free) in the 2000 Olympics may be the worst thing that has happened to US swimming. All the other coaches copied their track start, not looking at the scientific data that has them loosing 2 tenths of a second at 15 meters to the rest of the worlds sprinters.

I have had a lot of feedback from my article published in American Swimming Magazine (2004 issue 1) where I chastised US coaches for copying the loosers of the wave style breaststroke. It tood 12 years for US coaches to finally copy the style of Mike Barrowman instaed of the loosers high wave style.

knelson: I agree with you. The authors should never use averages, because you cannot compare a swimmer from Nigeria to a great starter like Ed Moses. Speaking of Ed, he had a huge advantage over the other breaststrokers 4 years ago with his great grab start, now that he has a track start, he is just ordinary.

The amazing thing about all the swimmers using the track start is no one has an advantage. I have seen heat after heat, everyone is equal with track starts. Yes the greater than six footers come out ahead of the shorter swimmers, but no large differences.

I watched Steve Lundquist in 1984 have a great grab start, he came up a half a body to 3/4 a body length ahead of everyone else. why would swimmers want to be just ordinary?

There have been many times in my swimming where I get a great start and come up as much as a body length ahead of the other breaststrokers. Now why would I ever want to become ordinary by using the track start?

If all you want to do is get into the water, go ahead and practice the track start.

If you want an advantage and want to win real bad, get a coach who knows grab starts and practice in deep water. I can easily go 6 foot deep off a great grab start. That is perfect for breaststroke, but not so good for freestyle. Also not so good for pools 4 foot deep.



The track start help keep you stable so you do not get disqualified, but most swimmers get very poor distance out of it. Only a great grab start offers the swimmers a chance at perfection and a lead off the start.

breastroker
July 9th, 2004, 11:54 PM
Back to talking about Olympic trials. Phelps swam a smart 200 free to win, Piersol and Lenny qualified in a very tight race in the 100 back, but the best race was the womens 100 breaststroke.

I was rooting for Megan Quann, but Amanda has changed her stroke just enough to get her the win. She is amazing, she can race and win on any day of the week, something most swimmers can't do. She has to be the favorite in the 200.

Note all you breaststroke swimmers, if you want to swim faster, do not look up at the end of the pool, put your eyes and head down and you will be instantly faster.

Howard
July 10th, 2004, 07:32 AM
Originally posted by breastroker
Howard,
The US coaches are a bunch of Lemmings, and for the most part do not study sports science to determine the best aproaches to swimming. Just today I wrote a 5 page article for publication of what has gone wrong with US coaching and the track start. Bottom line our coaches tend to copy success without looking at the whole picture. Gary Hall Jr and Anthony Ervins win ( 50 free) in the 2000 Olympics may be the worst thing that has happened to US swimming. All the other coaches copied their track start, not looking at the scientific data that has them loosing 2 tenths of a second at 15 meters to the rest of the worlds sprinters.

I have had a lot of feedback from my article published in American Swimming Magazine (2004 issue 1) where I chastised US coaches for copying the loosers of the wave style breaststroke. It tood 12 years for US coaches to finally copy the style of Mike Barrowman instaed of the loosers high wave style.

knelson: I agree with you. The authors should never use averages, because you cannot compare a swimmer from Nigeria to a great starter like Ed Moses. Speaking of Ed, he had a huge advantage over the other breaststrokers 4 years ago with his great grab start, now that he has a track start, he is just ordinary.

The amazing thing about all the swimmers using the track start is no one has an advantage. I have seen heat after heat, everyone is equal with track starts. Yes the greater than six footers come out ahead of the shorter swimmers, but no large differences.

I watched Steve Lundquist in 1984 have a great grab start, he came up a half a body to 3/4 a body length ahead of everyone else. why would swimmers want to be just ordinary?

There have been many times in my swimming where I get a great start and come up as much as a body length ahead of the other breaststrokers. Now why would I ever want to become ordinary by using the track start?

If all you want to do is get into the water, go ahead and practice the track start.

If you want an advantage and want to win real bad, get a coach who knows grab starts and practice in deep water. I can easily go 6 foot deep off a great grab start. That is perfect for breaststroke, but not so good for freestyle. Also not so good for pools 4 foot deep.



The track start help keep you stable so you do not get disqualified, but most swimmers get very poor distance out of it. Only a great grab start offers the swimmers a chance at perfection and a lead off the start.

Wayne

Why the US lemming community isn't beating down your door to pick your brain is a mystery to me. You crack me up.

Anyone notice that the women with the fastest 100 breast time of the meet didn't make the team?

breastroker
July 10th, 2004, 10:21 AM
Howard,
What's with the whole quote?

The Israel study showed that 63% of the men and 60% of the women used the grab start in the 2000 Olympic finals. Much of the 40% of track starts by women were USA swimmers.

Yet so far in the USA trials 100% are using the track start. Something is wrong when only one style is used in our trials. Our coaches just don't bother to try the grab start.

The most telling results are the in the shorter events such as the 50 free and the 100 breast, where in the finals the grab start has a advantage over the track start. The rest of the worlds best swimmers use the grab start for one reason, it is faster to 15 meters.



In the womens 100 breast, Stacianna had the best swim and by far the best stroke in prelims. She did a 1:07.20. I swa her in the stands during yesterdays prelims. Not what most coaches would recommend, hard seats for hours. Her stroke just was not as long and efficient in finals. I was hoping she could get in, with her stroke she was one of our best hopes for doing a 1:05 in the Olympics. Amanda is our best racer, but I just don't think she has the speed for a 1:05.

Allen Stark
July 10th, 2004, 12:41 PM
Wayne I couldn't agree more about the track start!!!!! It may be faster for someone with weak legs & strong upper body, but I doubt it. I keep asking coaches why they keep teaching the track start. They either say its easier or its safer. Swimming breaststroke with your head out of the water is easier & safer too. Dare to be great! (You are also really right about head position in breast. Last year I started really focusing on keeping my head down & after 4 mo. of misery I swam my best times in 9 years. Now I am focusing on REALLY shrugging my shoulders on the recovery & am swimming with one less stroke per 25. I had thought I was shrugging my shoulders but there is a huge difference between "kind of" & REALLY.)

valhallan
July 10th, 2004, 01:09 PM
Wayne,

Thanks for the daily "low down" at the trials. And not to turn this into thread about starts,...but it would be interesting to see how many of the 50M finalists launch themselves from the blocks using the *newer* track start.

By the way, I've also seen Steve Lundquist swim. And that guy could still probably kick a small house of it's foundation with those legs. Track start or grab, he would've lept the farthest, no question about it.

Howard
July 10th, 2004, 01:20 PM
I guess Staciana Stitts is exactly why we use the Olympic format in the trials. She didn't stand up and do it when it really counted. Too bad though. She had a great swim.

dreamer
July 10th, 2004, 01:45 PM
I agree that the grab start is much more effective, and just easier to do. I have only tried the track start a handful of times, and it hasnot worked out. From what I understand for the track start generally the majority of your weight is on the front leg, so you might not get the best jump off the block. Then you have to try and stick your legs back together in midair to be as streamlined as possible when you enter the water. which might not happen and could cost you distance and seconds.
As for the grab start all you gotta do is spring off the blocks and keep tight.

I was watching the 100m breast final yesterday, I noticed some swimmers taking a shorter stroke and more breaths than others. A few had an accoridion style stroke(arms and legs almost simultaneous) and some others had a "breathe-pull-kick" stroke. Is it just a matter of preference?

To me, it seems like the shorter the stroke, the harder you work, but the easier you tire out, which cost a few good swimmers yesterday.

dcarson
July 10th, 2004, 02:21 PM
Well, 2 male swimmers used the grab start at the trials this morning in the 200 breast. An interesting thing is when I competed in the World Masters Games in Melbourne, Australia in Oct. 2002, it was mostly U.S. swimmers doing the track start. The majority of other master swimmers from other countries did the grab start (especially the Australians). I never really paid much attention to it before, but now it will be interesting to watch in the Olympics...

dcarson
July 10th, 2004, 03:19 PM
USA Swimming web site is posting photos from the trials at:

http://www.usaswimming.org/USASWeb/DesktopDefault.aspx?TabId=610&Alias=Rainbow&Lang=en

Lots of really cool pictures....

knelson
July 10th, 2004, 03:38 PM
Another thing I was thinking about the track start versus grab start issue. It seems to me, back when the track start first came into common use, more pools had blocks with a forward lean to them. I assume there was a rules change in there somewhere that reduced the amount of slant allowed (I see the current USMS rule book and FINA rules dictate a max slope of 10 degees). It seems to me the track start would be more effective on a blcok with some forward lean, because your back leg would have a little more to push against. Does anyone know if the rules for blocks have changed significantly?

I know the main thing I don't like about the track start is it seems like you get nothing from your back leg, not to mention the inherent asymmetry the start produces.

Here's a link to the FINA rules, by the way: http://www.fina.org/facilityrules_2.html

Peter Cruise
July 10th, 2004, 04:04 PM
Since Wayne's observations set off a brisk debate about starts, let's pick out something else he observed, namely that Torres was the best looking swimmer ever- granted she's great looking, but just among the Americans I'd nominate Summer Sanders for sure (never mind some of the Swedish gals). Wayne- when you sat at the same table with Torres did you happen to ask her how she felt about the grab start? hee hee

gull
July 10th, 2004, 10:22 PM
Sorry, Wayne--I'm with Peter on this one. Summer Sanders, definitely.

Sonic Swimmer78
July 10th, 2004, 10:24 PM
How about that one female swimmer (Don't remember her name) who shaved her head? I find that to be both brave and a turn on! Rrrrrraaawwrr! :p

Howard
July 10th, 2004, 10:47 PM
Originally posted by Sonic Swimmer78
How about that one female swimmer (Don't remember her name) who shaved her head? I find that to be both brave and a turn on! Rrrrrraaawwrr! :p

I'm guessing you mean Staciana Stitts and she didn't shave her head. She just doesn't have any hair.

Sonic Swimmer78
July 10th, 2004, 11:38 PM
Wow, I guess she's at an advantage if she doesn't have any hair!

I still think she looks very attractive.

breastroker
July 11th, 2004, 12:35 AM
OK guys, Summer was a babe, just last time I saw her swim she was so tan it was a turn off. I have been talking to the men arround the pool deck, and the concensious is Amanda is babe-a-liciuos, I believe is the word most used. Other words such a booty were mentioned.

Actually there were finally three grab starts today, all in the mens 200 breast prelims, heat 2 lane 7, heat 3 lane 8 and heat 4 lane 8. Only one looked very good off the start, Patrick Fowler. The other two did not gain anything over the track starters.

Staciana Stitts has Alopecia, check out http://www.naaf.org/kids/story.asp?ID=5

She is all lady, she was sitting with her boyfriend during prelims before the 100 breast finals. I think sitting on those hard seats hurt her performance in the finals.

Allen, don't get too fast. You are fast enough and you are in my age group.:D :D Actually what some people saw in the breaststrokes is some swimmers are using the lats by pulling like a butterfly pull rather than the traditional scull out and scull in. What these swimmers gain most is the ability to kick with their head underwater more. Almost a pull - kick and glide:p

I am sitting with Brendan Hansens dad and extended family. Todays swims were easy!!! Take that to the bank, a new world record tomorrow in the mens 200 breast. I predict him out in 1:02.1 and back in 1:06.8. Anything faster than 1:02 will lower the record more!

knelson
July 11th, 2004, 12:49 PM
Originally posted by breastroker
I have been talking to the men arround the pool deck, and the concensious is Amanda is babe-a-liciuos, I believe is the word most used.

Yeah, I know a lot of people think Amanda's a "babe," but gotta say she doesn't do anything for me.

breastroker
July 11th, 2004, 11:27 PM
Had lots of FUN today. Became an official member of the Brendan Hansen family. They gave me a Nike hat, Brendan wears Nike suits!!!

We expected 33.5 and 33.5 for laps 3 and 4, he went out fast at 1:01.88 and did 33.50 and 33.66 for the last two laps. We hear the pool has a real wave the swimmers have to fight, as it is the same depth the whole way. Some might consider it a slow pool, compared to say Indy.

Phelps is swimming so many events, and is not ducking anyone. He will have to swim against the Thorpedo and the best of the world in the 200 free, and against Piersol in the 200 back. And he still has to beat Tom Malchow in the 200 fly. The Ian Crocker in the 100 fly!!

Saw Jim Miller, USMS President, and Jeff Farrell, the 1956 Olympic swimmer who swims in SPMA:D :D

Bill Mullikan (Gold 200 breast 1956) presented Brendan Hansen with his gold medal, Bill also swims masters.

knelson
July 12th, 2004, 12:40 AM
Tomorrow is going to be great. We'll get to see Michael Phelps swim finals in two events (200 back and 200 IM) within minutes of each other. I think it's safe to say no one else on earth could pull that off.

How about Kaitlin Sandeno? No one really said much about her beforehand, but here she is already having qualified in four events. She could qualify in the 800 free, too, but she hinted on TV tonight that she could scratch that. I think she should go for it!

And Dana and Tara Kirk the first time sisters have qualified for the same Olympic team.

DocWhoRocks
July 12th, 2004, 09:01 AM
Originally posted by DocWhoRocks
I really hope Scott Usher makes it in the 100 breast - GO WYOMING!!!! :D

Well Scott didn't make the 100 br. - got 3rd :(

But he had an incredible 200 br. and made the team!!! WAY TO GO SCOTT! Dropped over 3 seconds from his original seed time. I'm really happy for him.

breastroker
July 12th, 2004, 11:11 AM
Kaitlin Sandeno has been increadible. The croud continues to buzz every time she swims. She is rapidly becoming the croud favorite. At the Olympics don't count her out on anything.

Mark in MD
July 12th, 2004, 01:36 PM
Here's a picture that, up until now, many of us thought we'd never see. D Carson brought this to my attention. Yes, that's Mark Spitz and Michael Phelps.

knelson
July 12th, 2004, 02:04 PM
Favorite picture so far from the swimcam gallery:
http://www.usaswimming.org/USASWeb/_Rainbow/Album/1239m373627ac-4236-408a-8517-0df5463fffff.jpg

OK, for some reason this shows up as a link not a photo. Maybe the administrator has turned off the ability to link to photos directly.

breastroker
July 12th, 2004, 03:12 PM
Having met Mark Spitz many times at our UCLA swim meets, I was surprised at how well he handled the presentation of the medal for the 200 meter fly, and how gracious he was towards Phelps. Spitx came up several notches in everyones eyes by his genuine display of "handing the mantle of greatness" over to Phelps.

Mark never backed out of his quest, and he had some great competition. Few remember he set a world record in EVERY event he swam.

Phelps is going after the best in the world, he is a true winner even if he looses the 100 fly tomorrow.

swimshark
July 12th, 2004, 03:43 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by knelson
[B]Favorite picture so far from the swimcam gallery:
http://www.usaswimming.org/USASWeb/_Rainbow/Album/1239m373627ac-4236-408a-8517-0df5463fffff.jpg

Wow, that is an awesome picture!!!

Bob McAdams
July 12th, 2004, 04:10 PM
Originally posted by knelson
Favorite picture so far from the swimcam gallery:
http://www.usaswimming.org/USASWeb/_Rainbow/Album/1239m373627ac-4236-408a-8517-0df5463fffff.jpg

OK, for some reason this shows up as a link not a photo. Maybe the administrator has turned off the ability to link to photos directly.

What is most impressive to me is how little he's disturbing the water as he swims.

breastroker
July 13th, 2004, 12:05 AM
Did you see the style of Amanda Beard in the NEW WORLD record 200 breast!!!!:D

She is doing exactly what I have said in my articles on breaststroke, the wave style is not about throwing yourself over the waters surface, it is all about being able to kick with your head under water. Amanda spent a LONG time underwater each stroke, while all the other swimmers were spending very short times with their heads underwater. She took a LOT less number of strokes compared to much bigger girls like Stacianna Stitts.

For those of you who are not members of the American Coaches Association, you can read my article on "What went wrong with the Wave style breaststroke? on my website at http://www.breaststroke.info/

Many of the ideas I presented are being displayed at Olympic trials, although many are still swimming "older" styles of breaststroke. If you want to swim breaststroke better and much easier, read and enjoy.

knelson
July 13th, 2004, 04:05 PM
I'm sure there were many people who were impressed with Tara Kirk and Staciana Stitts "going for it" on the first 100 of the 200 breast yeseterday, but really they both swam horrible races. Swimming ten seconds slower on the second hundred = not good. Obviously they both had the thought that they needed to get out ahead and try to hang on. I guess it's tough to accept that the race was really for second place because Amanda had first place sewn up.