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swimgirl78
September 17th, 2004, 07:53 PM
This morning, while swimming at a gym I occasionally visit, the gym staff put up the yellow "do not enter" (police-like) tape and then asked me to leave the pool saying there was a problem with the chlorine. This is the second time in less than a week that the pool was closed down.

A woman in the locker room told me that the three women, who are the most frequent swimmers in the morning, have all come down with bladder infections. They all believe it is from the pool. Does anyone know if this is actually possible? Can you catch something like a bladder infection from a pool? :confused:

aquageek
September 17th, 2004, 08:45 PM
This sounds like a post for gull80 to answer.

jim clemmons
September 17th, 2004, 09:05 PM
For as long as I've been swimming, I've never had a bladder infection. :rolleyes:


Had some nasty ear infections though. :eek:

thisgirl13
September 17th, 2004, 10:48 PM
My mother is a nurse, and she tells me that "very highly unlikely" that you can contract a bladder infection from a chlorinated pool.

Also, from what I know from high school chemisty (only been a couple years, I'm not that rusty) Chlorine is used primarily as a water sanitizer, mostly because of its ability to kill single celled algae and bacteria by oxidation, a unique property of the chlorine which, in regulated doses, will not harm human skin or organs.

So to answer your question, I'd have to say"probably not."

:)

SWinkleblech
September 18th, 2004, 10:53 AM
I was a pool manager for 9 years and know that chlorine does not always kill all bacteria in the pool water quick enough. There have been cases such as ecoli being passed on in swimming pools. That is why many pools require young kids to wear swimmies and not diapers in their pools. Now I have never heard of a bladder infection being caused by swimming pools but I wouldn't totally rule it out. Was the pool being shut down by the pool managers or was it being shut down by the Health department? If it is by the Health department they should know if there is a real problem. If it is by the staff they might be unsure and just being over catious.

emmett
September 18th, 2004, 02:19 PM
It is quite possible the pool went without (or with too little)chlorine for a period of time (ideal situation for breeding and spreading all manner of low-order life forms, especially if the water is warm) then, subsequently, was superchlorinated. Both conditions would warrant pool closure untill appropriate pool chemistry is re-established.

swimgirl78
September 18th, 2004, 03:43 PM
Thank you everyone for your replies. I appreciate the help.

SWinkleblech, the pool was being shut down by staff, but I was told that someone is reporting the gym to the health department, after a swimmer took a sample of the water to have it tested independently and found it had basically no cholorine (on top of the suspect bladder infections).

Thanks again.

SWinkleblech
September 18th, 2004, 11:48 PM
Originally posted by swimgirl78
Thank you everyone for your replies. I appreciate the help.

SWinkleblech, the pool was being shut down by staff, but I was told that someone is reporting the gym to the health department, after a swimmer took a sample of the water to have it tested independently and found it had basically no cholorine (on top of the suspect bladder infections).

Thanks again.

That might just do it. If you are concerned about the chlorine levels, I know in PA anyone has the right to see the records of chlorine readings. I don't know if this holds true in other states.

gull
September 20th, 2004, 10:02 AM
I could not find any published reports of bladder infections (cystitis) caused by swimming pools. There is one report of vibrio cystitis attributed to swimming in the Chesapeake Bay. Common things being common, I suspect the women at the pool in question developed cystitis the usual way (ie unrelated to swimming).

Then again, this isn't my specialty.

aztimm
September 21st, 2004, 04:51 PM
I don't know about bladder infections, but I have gotten ear and sinus infections from rapid changes in pool chemistry and also from swimming in open water (where there is no sanitation). Earlier this year, they drained/refilled our pool and let us swim while the water was still refilling. Like clockwork, 3 days after an ear infection started. The same thing happened just days after I returned from Cabo San Lucas, where I was in the ocean and hotel pools.

A doctor once told me that the best way to avoid these infections was to get the pool water out ASAP. I always use those hair dryers, aim right in my ears to dry them, and make sure I give my nose a good blow after getting out of the pool.

Whether or not the bladder infections of these women is connected to the pool, I think it is good that the pool staff are being proactive, and with any luck the pool will be reopened shortly.

Tim

Rob Copeland
September 21st, 2004, 05:35 PM
Tim, Iím not sure if your blow dryer trick would work with bladder infections. However, for drying ears I find a few drops of rubbing alcohol also works.

geochuck
September 21st, 2004, 06:18 PM
The only time I had to shut down my pool was when a little fellow who ate to much spinach expelled it in the pool. It was like little greens all over the place.

George

swimgirl78
September 21st, 2004, 06:30 PM
LOL Rob! I spit water all over my keyboard after reading your response...only to be followed by a nice visual from geochuck. Reading this post certainly brightened my day :)

gull
September 21st, 2004, 10:37 PM
If we're going to start using the hair dryers to prevent bladder infections, we may need to mount them lower on the walls.

Or maybe not.

Scansy
September 21st, 2004, 11:37 PM
Originally posted by Rob Copeland
Tim, Iím not sure if your blow dryer trick would work with bladder infections. However, for drying ears I find a few drops of rubbing alcohol also works.

If we start to promote using blow dryers for this, how will we keep anyone in the pool swimming????? Wouldn't there be a long line for the blower?

Of course, it could be a way to get more people to join!:)

HirsuteSwimmer
September 21st, 2004, 11:57 PM
Originally posted by Rob Copeland
However, for drying ears I find a few drops of rubbing alcohol also works.

My ORL once told me that alcohol can damage the eardrum and to use only vinegar in the ear. It doesn't dry but raise the pH to a level inadequate for bacteria to live.

Xpac
September 22nd, 2004, 02:25 AM
Originally posted by HirsuteSwimmer
My ORL once told me that alcohol can damage the eardrum and to use only vinegar in the ear. It doesn't dry but raise the pH to a level inadequate for bacteria to live.

I use an over the counter ear drop for swimmers. I think it contains alcohol I hope that doesn't damage my drum.

gull
September 22nd, 2004, 09:21 AM
The OTC drops contain isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol). I'm not aware of any potential for damage to the ear drum. I've been using this for years.