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Randy Nutt
September 27th, 2004, 08:46 PM
Congratulations to Ron Collins who successfully swam the English Channel this season. It is nice to see an event director who also can swim! Ron directs the annual 24 Mile Tampa Bay Marathon Swim.

See Ron's website for details: www.distancematters.com

Wisdom
October 8th, 2004, 11:16 AM
What caused the injuries to the front of his shoulders?

Leonard Jansen
October 8th, 2004, 12:07 PM
Probably got cut on barnacles/shells at the end climbing out of the water and onto the rocks.

Wisdom
October 8th, 2004, 03:05 PM
I can see how you could cut up your hands, feet and legs that way, but the front of the shoulders? And they are symetrical.

Leonard Jansen
October 8th, 2004, 04:31 PM
Maybe go to his website and leave him an email asking him. I met him once and he is a very nice person, so don't be shy.

-LBJ

Rob Copeland
October 8th, 2004, 04:37 PM
The injuries on Ron’s neck and shoulders appear to be salt water rubs. Swimming in salt water for extended periods typically rubs raw certain areas of the body where the repetitive motions of the stroke and the associated skin on skin rubbing (with added salt) will rub right through the skin.

It looks like Ron missed a couple of spots when he greased up before the race. In his pre-race photos you’ll see he has channel grease under the arms and a little on the neck, but none where he was rubbed raw. Although the fronts of the shoulders seems a bit odd???

It usually takes one big swim (6+ hours) to really find our where you rub. Most people who have done ocean marathons, have 1 or 2 experiences of missing a spot or not keeping a spot properly lubricated. For me, in my first Tampa Bay marathon, I missed a spot on my neck, and after 10 1/2 hours of swimming it was a bloody mess. Fortunately I’ve learned from that 1 bad experience and from the wisdom of others.

Lesson 1 – Learn where to apply grease (under arms, between thighs, around neck, …)
Lesson 2 – Learn where NOT to apply grease (keep it away from goggles and eyes)

Wisdom
October 8th, 2004, 06:51 PM
Very interesting.

I haven't done that long a salt water swim yet so I don't have experience with this type of repetitive motion injury.

I would have never guessed (1) that salt water was that abrassive or (2) that you would rub the front of the shoulder like that. I can see the neck, thighs, armpits because of the skin on skin contact but I would have never guessed the front of the shoulders, LOL and apparently he didn't either.

matysekj
October 8th, 2004, 08:37 PM
One possibility for what caused his front-of-the-shoulder chafing is his chin stubble. When I swim a long freestyle workout, the front of my right shoulder will be rubbed a bit raw due to bad stroke technique and my ching rubbing it slightly. For a very long swim like this in salt water, I could easily see myself coming out of the water looking like that. If that's what it was, he at least appears to be lucky to be a bilateral breather!

(see http://www.distancematters.com/8ronshoulders.jpg)

jroddin
October 12th, 2004, 12:36 PM
Rob forgot lesson 3:

Learn to swim races 100 yards and under :D

Rob Copeland
October 12th, 2004, 08:22 PM
And Lesson 4 for Jeff – add a few pounds, remembering how cold you were after the swim at San Francisco a couple of years ago, a little extra insulation wouldn’t hurt.

Fritz
October 13th, 2004, 10:27 AM
Lesson #4. Your team gets the same number of points for the 50 back as the 1500.

Leonard Jansen
October 13th, 2004, 11:03 AM
Lesson #5: The scoring system was devised by ADHD sprinter types.

Fritz
October 13th, 2004, 11:29 AM
What were we talking about?

geochuck
October 13th, 2004, 11:36 AM
Originally posted by Rob Copeland
The injuries on Ron’s neck and shoulders appear to be salt water rubs. Swimming in salt water for extended periods typically rubs raw certain areas of the body where the repetitive motions of the stroke and the associated skin on skin rubbing (with added salt) will rub right through the skin.

It looks like Ron missed a couple of spots when he greased up before the race. In his pre-race photos you’ll see he has channel grease under the arms and a little on the neck, but none where he was rubbed raw. Although the fronts of the shoulders seems a bit odd???

It usually takes one big swim (6+ hours) to really find our where you rub. Most people who have done ocean marathons, have 1 or 2 experiences of missing a spot or not keeping a spot properly lubricated. For me, in my first Tampa Bay marathon, I missed a spot on my neck, and after 10 1/2 hours of swimming it was a bloody mess. Fortunately I’ve learned from that 1 bad experience and from the wisdom of others.
Lesson 1 – Learn where to apply grease (under arms, between thighs, around neck, …)
Lesson 2 – Learn where NOT to apply grease (keep it away from goggles and eyes) You are right Rob if you don't apply lubricant to your chin and neck even the back of your neck you get rubbed raw. It appears to me the front of the neck and shoulder injuries are caused by friction. If you did not apply Vaseline or, (it looks like he used Lanolin) properly these marks appear. This also happens in fresh water.

George www.swimdownhill.com

Rob Copeland
October 13th, 2004, 02:10 PM
“This also happens in fresh water.” George, I’ll take your word on this one. Most of my long races have been salt water swims, only Manhattan Island and a 25K Lake swim have been fresh or near-fresh water. And it may have been that I was properly greased for these two.

And since George brought up Lanolin – Lesson 6: Don’t use Lanolin for warm-to-hot water swims, it has a tendency to melt away when it gets warm. I stick with Vaseline in any race over about 70F. Although Lanolin or channel grease (50/50 Lanolin-Vaseline) works best for me in cold water, below 65F.

geochuck
October 13th, 2004, 04:09 PM
My friend Tom Bucy used grafite grease, he applied it all over his body, he said when the waves hit him they will just slide off of him. It became hard and solid and heavy. He was pulled out half way through a race it was like tar. The only way they could remove it was with naptha gas he never used it again. All greases are not equal.

I only used vaseline on all friction points.

George www.swimdownhill.com

2go+h20
October 13th, 2004, 08:16 PM
A friend of mine uses anhydrous lanolin. That stuff is extremely durable. Goes on thick, sticky and not exactly smooth. After 15hours in the water he still had a thick layer and no rubs or war wounds.
However removing the stuff is a nightmare. A baker's scraper removes some, then it either rubbing alcohol or dishwashing detergent. I felt like I could make a great ad for "cuts the grease". But make sure you do this outside as this stuff will definately clog drains. I am still trying to get it off the blanket we wrapped him up in at the completion of the marathon.
I agree, Ron's rubs look like a stubble rub. At least he's a bilateral breather. Or if he wasn't he became one to give the other shoulder some relief. Imagine what a bilateral breather's one shoulder would look like. One of my training partners uses bodyglide stuff to prevent this, as he too gets nasty war wounds.
Congratulations Rob. That was some ordeal. I admire your focus and determination to complete despite the 'moving' shore line. Well Done. You are an inspiration.
Kiwi