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hooked-on-swimming
November 25th, 2004, 07:45 PM
I am still to go to my first meet, so I was very curious about one thing: how do swimmers(pretty much everything except freestyle) watch their competitors in other lanes, especially when moving your head can do some time damage when it really matters in very tight and important competitions.Do swimmers actually sometimes not see what is going on next to them and just try to swim their best?I was watching the 200m. breaststroke final from Athens and if you pay attention to the last meters of the race it looks like Brendan Hansen was not aware of the hungarian kid(Daniel Gyurta)coming right behind him to steal his silver which he did in a very amazing waY.Hansen could have taken two short explosive strokes at the very end instead of gliding slowly with one long stroke to finish the race where he lost to the hungarian by .08 sec.

Seagurl51
November 25th, 2004, 08:14 PM
I too have yet to go to my first meet, but when I swim I like to practice watching my "competitors" in the lane next to me. If there is people swimming next to me, then I find out different ways to watch them without messing up my stroke. I figure this way, I can use it in a race, and since it's only practice it doesn't matter if I find one that slows me down. My favorite one so far is to scan the "horizon" when my head is underwater for breaststroke. I use my glide to scan my eyes without moving my head. For butterfly, I'm usually to focused on messing up my stroke to worry about anything else, so just do what works for you; and on backstroke, I just try to look out of the corner of my eyes. That's just what I do. Have fun at your first meet! and GOOD LUCK!!!

~Kyra

Alicat
November 26th, 2004, 02:42 PM
As a vetern swimmer...

A quick turn of the head during the recovery/breath of the fly you can see who is next to you, same in breast stroke, in the backstroke, as you roll from one side to another you can see the kick of someone ahead of you, and if you are in the lead, just watching the field. However...

You shouldn't be looking, just swim your own race. If you beat your time you have a personal victory, if you are first --that's gravy!

Guvnah
November 29th, 2004, 03:01 PM
Do lousy in your first meet!

That way, it'll be easier to show improvement in your next! :) :)

Tarzan
November 29th, 2004, 03:33 PM
I think the best thing to do is always swim against the clock. Always shoot for your fastest time. That way you are always improving and getting better (thus, winning more). I don't like watching other swimmers it makes me go slower. I just race all out and concentrate on what I'm going to do to go faster.

EyeoreSAM
November 30th, 2004, 10:03 AM
I agree looking at the other swimmers in your race is really distracting. You just have to try to swim your own race and beat the clock.

craiglll@yahoo.com
November 30th, 2004, 10:53 AM
At many master meet you are swimmign with peole in different age groups. this means that you really aren't competing against them anyway. Race the clock.

knelson
November 30th, 2004, 11:49 AM
Originally posted by craiglll@yahoo.com
At many master meet you are swimmign with peole in different age groups. this means that you really aren't competing against them anyway. Race the clock.

Come on now, you're competing against everyone in the pool! I want to beat the guy (or gal) next to me whether they're 18 or 80.

I agree with all the stuff about "swimming your own race" but there is something to be said about sneaking a peak at your competitors. The best time to do it in freestyle is when you breather. I'd say that's an advantage of bilateral breathing.

EyeoreSAM
November 30th, 2004, 12:07 PM
Don't get me wrong--I love a race it doesn't matter if your male or female I love the rush of the race, I just think that looking tends to slow you down so just race the clock and give it your all. When you win great--when you lose---pout!!

newmastersswimmer
November 30th, 2004, 02:18 PM
Don't get me wrong--I love a race it doesn't matter if your male or female I love the rush of the race, I just think that looking tends to slow you down so just race the clock and give it your all. When you win great--when you lose---pout!! originally posted by evesore


I see your point there....looking may in fact slow you down (there's no arguing that)....but I feel like Knelson when it comes to competition (maybe I'm just shallow or something so I like to compete and beat people to boost my fragile ego?...I'll admit that that's a real possibility perhaps....BUT I like to win and so I think it is important to peek at your competition when you can....It's like Hooked On said about the Hungarian dude....Someone can sneak up on you and out touch you ....And you may not even know they are coming if you don't occassionally sneak a peek around and see where your competition is).


newmastersswimmer

jpjackson76
November 30th, 2004, 03:40 PM
I don't look for my competitors but I am aware where they are compared to me. I too like to win my heat regardless who is next to me.

LindsayNB
December 1st, 2004, 11:07 AM
Originally posted by hooked-on-swimming
Hansen could have taken two short explosive strokes at the very end instead of gliding slowly with one long stroke to finish the race where he lost to the hungarian by .08 sec.

If two short strokes would have got him to the wall faster he should have done them regardless of what anyone else in the pool was doing, no? According to the commentators (on CBC anyway) Hansen's real problem was that he let Kitajima throw him off his race. In any case, if he had ignored everyone else and swam his trials race he would have won gold.

SWinkleblech
December 2nd, 2004, 08:33 AM
Just don't do what my daughter did at one of her meets. She was so worried about seeing her compition that she started to swim her breast stroke sideways. That was a comical sight to see.