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scyfreestyler
January 4th, 2005, 12:24 PM
Just wanted to share some information with my online swimming enthusiasts. After a month of "recovery" from my shoulder injury I was still not where I wanted to be (I am too impatient I know), so I went to see a PT yesterday. He did things to my arm/shoulder that I was certain would have my upper body in traction by the time the sun came up this AM. My premenition was to be incorrect as I feel fine this AM. I feel some muscle soreness from doing my cuff exercises with some threa-band but other than that I feel very good. I have decided to give my shoulder a week off of any pulling and stick to kicking workouts; talk about boring. Has anybody else ever received a trasndermal electrical transfer of anti-inflamatory? I got one yesterday and I am wondering how legit this practice is. I don't suspect that it is dangerous but I do question it's effectiveness. If I am not getting prodded with needles and surgical instruments I tend to think that something is not right. Perhaps I am opening a new door for myself.

etrain
January 4th, 2005, 02:15 PM
The transdermal electrical transfer of anti-inflamatory you are talking about, is this where they basically hook you up to a machine with little pads and then crank up the juice. I use to do this on my back in college. Then they used it on my back at the chiro. Sometimes it helps other times it doesn't. If I remember right what it was doing was basically flushing out all the garbage that has stuck around in your muscles, so they can heal faster. Hope it works out for you.

etrain

bckstrker
January 4th, 2005, 05:21 PM
"Has anybody else ever received a trasndermal electrical transfer of anti-inflamatory? I got one yesterday and I am wondering how legit this practice is. I don't suspect that it is dangerous but I do question it's effectiveness."


I would guess you are referring to iontophoresis, which is a way of introducing an anti-inflammatory agent, such as possibly Dexamethasone, into the area that is inflamed. Your PT is using a very "legit" treatment that has been researched and documented as to its efficacy. It is quite effective as it is based on ion transfers and the medication ion (in the above example it is a negative one) is driven into the tissue transdermally by use of a negative charge. You should get good relief with the treatment. Trust that your PT is a qualified health care professional who is well trained in the area of musculoskeletal injuries as that is what PTs do best. ;) Good luck with your recovery and rehab!:D

Sam Perry
January 4th, 2005, 05:31 PM
I am getting it now after my back surgery. It is helping me to feel better temporarily so I can do some other therapy to speed up the healing process. I definitely think it's legit, just doesn't always work for everyone.

thisgirl13
January 4th, 2005, 08:19 PM
I received a very similar treatment for my knee a few years ago, though I'm not sure anything was actually put on the pads, they may have just been electrocuting me for fun :rolleyes:

However, I found out after I finished my PT that those electro-therapy sessions, while stingy and kind of weird to me, actually worked.

I know what you mean about thinking you would end up in traction. When I was doing PT for my knee, they used to sit me in a backless desk chair with wheels, tie a three foot rope to it and another desk chair, and place one of the therapists in the other chair. The objective, of course, was for me to pull said therapist around the clinic, which was supposed to make my hamstrings and quads stronger. The only thing it really did was make me feel like a mule. There was even a race one time, between myself and a very tall gentleman, recovering from a football injury. They gave us each a physical therapist, except they gave him the smallest girl in the place, and they gave me a guy who could have been Arnold's stunt double. Needless to say, I lost :D

scyfreestyler
January 5th, 2005, 08:22 PM
I had my second appointment today and the PT was a bit confused about my MRI diagnosis as compared to where my pain was actually coming from. After various movement tests he found that my left shoulder is actually a bit unstable and that is likely the cause of my problems. Because of this, much of the exercise done in our meetings has probably set me further back as it was directed at the wrong areas. His suggestion was to continue with the thera-band cuff strengthening exercises every day and that should help to stabilize the joint. He also mentioned that I may never fully recover the stability in that arm and that I should probably avoid competetive swimming or any other event that involves overhead use of the arm with great force. I don't know if he is just preparing me for the worst or what. I thought that some minor instability was easily cured with cuff exercises. My MRI showed my labrum to be intact as well as the connecting tendons. I don't think that I have any real hardware issues. Any opinions? I am at wit's end with this injury. What I wouldn't give to be past this when I wake up tomorrow.

gull
January 6th, 2005, 10:12 AM
My orthopedist and my physical therapist both specialize in sports medicine and work with athletes of all ages. Although your situation may be different, you had a negative MRI (as did I). Neither of them told me to give up competitive swimming--in fact, they worked with me so I could stay in the water. Muscle imbalance/weakness involving the shoulder is common in swimmers but can be addressed with the right exercises. As I've posted before, if you strengthen the rotator cuff and the muscles that stabllize the scapula, there will be less impingement of the tendons (the cause of the tendinitis). Perhaps you should look for someone who specializes in sports medicine. Check out the USA Swimming website for a listing of specialists.

scyfreestyler
January 6th, 2005, 11:28 AM
Originally posted by gull80
My orthopedist and my physical therapist both specialize in sports medicine and work with athletes of all ages. Although your situation may be different, you had a negative MRI (as did I). Neither of them told me to give up competitive swimming--in fact, they worked with me so I could stay in the water. Muscle imbalance/weakness involving the shoulder is common in swimmers but can be addressed with the right exercises. As I've posted before, if you strengthen the rotator cuff and the muscles that stabllize the scapula, there will be less impingement of the tendons (the cause of the tendinitis). Perhaps you should look for someone who specializes in sports medicine. Check out the USA Swimming website for a listing of specialists. Gull, if the joint is not tight what is to keep the tendon from being impinged in the labrum/humerus joint? That is the problem I have with getting back in the water right away. If I lift my arm out to the side I can feel a bit of pain in my supraspinatus tendon that I am reasonably sure is coming from being pinched. My therapist is familiar with sports injuries and that seems to be their primary customer base. His methods seem to be in accordance with what I hear from other swimmers experience but he also prefers that I refrain from overhead activity until my muscles are strengthened up. This is my main question to you, how long does it take for these muscles to take hold and tighten up the joint?

gull
January 6th, 2005, 12:58 PM
I'm not an orthopedist so my answer is based on my experience and what I've read. Neither my orthopedist nor my therapist thought I needed to stay out of the water during rehab. I did not notice significant improvement for several months, but it has been progressive since then. I did the exercises every day (bands, some weights, ball on the wall, body blade, etc.) and continued swimming carefully. I avoided paddles and did not swim butterfly. I increased yardage very slowly (initially 1500/day) and did not swim every day. I used ice and antiinflammatories (including Vioxx, which worked great!). My goal was to keep swimming, and they worked with me so I could do that.

scyfreestyler
January 6th, 2005, 01:02 PM
Originally posted by gull80
I'm not an orthopedist so my answer is based on my experience and what I've read. Neither my orthopedist nor my therapist thought I needed to stay out of the water during rehab. I did not notice significant improvement for several months, but it has been progressive since then. I did the exercises every day (bands, some weights, ball on the wall, body blade, etc.) and continued swimming carefully. I avoided paddles and did not swim butterfly. I increased yardage very slowly (initially 1500/day) and did not swim every day. I used ice and antiinflammatories (including Vioxx, which worked great!). My goal was to keep swimming, and they worked with me so I could do that.
Did you have full ROM, pain free before you got back in the pool? That is something that I don't currently have. I am going to be a bit more firm with my PT about NEEDING to get back in the water. Perhaps a little pressure will force him to be more aggressive in my treatment.

gull
January 6th, 2005, 01:24 PM
Originally posted by 330man
Did you have full ROM, pain free before you got back in the pool?

I had good ROM but was not pain-free.

I specifically asked if I would do myself any harm if I kept swimming.

scyfreestyler
January 6th, 2005, 02:21 PM
Thanks Gull, I will keep your advice in mind. I am going to stick with the therapy for a few weeks anyhow and work towards improvment. If I can develop more ROM in a pain free fashion then I will slowly work back into swimming. I guess one positive thing from all of this is that my legs will be incredibly strong from all of the kicking that I am doing.

scyfreestyler
January 6th, 2005, 02:21 PM
Thanks Gull, I will keep your advice in mind. I am going to stick with the therapy for a few weeks anyhow and work towards improvment. If I can develop more ROM in a pain free fashion then I will slowly work back into swimming. I guess one positive thing from all of this is that my legs will be incredibly strong from all of the kicking that I am doing.

scyfreestyler
January 6th, 2005, 02:21 PM
Thanks Gull, I will keep your advice in mind. I am going to stick with the therapy for a few weeks anyhow and work towards improvment. If I can develop more ROM in a pain free fashion then I will slowly work back into swimming. I guess one positive thing from all of this is that my legs will be incredibly strong from all of the kicking that I am doing.