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hooked-on-swimming
January 22nd, 2005, 03:19 PM
I am very concerned about training with the right puls, I tried to find some info on what heart rate to train at, but so far I just have general info.I would really like to keep my heart healthy, because I stumbled into an article(it's in Russian, unfortunately, so I cannot post it here ... I will translate it some time) about how important it is to train and not go over 180 beats per minute(especially for starters) a lot during work-outs and try to mostly keep it in the range of 120-150, otherwise it is a slow path to a heart attack ...So I was wondering: how do you guys measure your heart rate and what do you try to keep it at most of the time and how often do you train with maximum heart rate?
Thanks a bunch.
P.S the article I refer to is extremely interesting, I will translate it one day ...

Fred Johnson
January 22nd, 2005, 03:34 PM
I just got a heart monitor from Polar. I run with it although I understand that some models can be used in the pool. I have found it very helpful in "seeing" what my heart is doing while I am running.

Among other things, it measures current heart rate, average heart rate and total time within the "target zone." The "target zone" is a range of bpm's that correlates to 65% - 85% of your max heart rate. The receiver (the watch-looking part you wear around your wrist) calculates your individual target zone based on information that you input when you first program it before your first use. As you exercise, the receiver beeps while you are outside the target zone (either too low or too high). It shuts up once your heart enters the target zone.

I like it because I can "see" whether I am in or out of the target zone and how much I am taxing my heart in a given workout. Recently it showed that during a mid-week run, my avg bpm for a typical distance dropped about 5 bpm (from 136 to 131). I had not run particularly hard though. So it confirmed my easier pace and made me pick it up a little the next time out.

On the other side of the coin, some people think they are difficult to use and too much to think about while exercising.

You be the judge.

hooked-on-swimming
January 22nd, 2005, 03:46 PM
I would love to get one specifically made for swimming.Are there Polar heart monitors like that?Any links would be appreciated ...

mjtyson
January 22nd, 2005, 03:52 PM
Could you send me the link to the Russian article? I need to work on my reading abilities, and I'd love to get a Russian article about heart rate/swimming/working out.

Spasibo i poka,
Mike

hooked-on-swimming
January 22nd, 2005, 04:20 PM
Michael, i will definitely do that, unfortunately, this article makes more reference to cycling, skiing and running ,just slightly mentioning swimming, but it embraces pretty much any sport where you need to pay attention to heart rate training, it also has some very interesting ideas about new way to train sportsmen based on their heart volume, heart rate, muscle weight, etc.ANyways, enjoy:


http://www.roller.ru/content/cat-181/article-1495.html
http://www.roller.ru/content/cat-181/article-1496.html

hooked-on-swimming
January 22nd, 2005, 04:26 PM
Well, I am more than concerned that I need a heart rate monitor.But I am really sceptical about the chest belts.Are they going to stay on?Do you know any good heart rate monitors without the belts(just a wrist watch)?It should be able to track your pulse off your wrist as efficiently as when applied directly onto your chest, right?

hooked-on-swimming
January 22nd, 2005, 04:27 PM
I meant to say "I am more than convinced", sorry, lol :-)

Kevin in MD
January 22nd, 2005, 07:31 PM
First of all, you can find good advice on using heart rate in swimming at www.breastroke.info. Coach Wayne the author also posts here under the name breastroker.

In swimming though, you can take 10 second heart rates at the end of your swims and then starst keeping track of what heart rates come from what paces.

The heart rate monitor in the pool isn't as important because there are no waves, no current and the pool is the same distance every time.

That said, I keep track of everything that comes out on heart rate and have never heard anything relating heart rates above 180 with increased rick of heart attack. Granted, i don't track the the russian sports and medicine literature.

scyfreestyler
January 22nd, 2005, 07:32 PM
In the event that you buy one of these, please don't allow it to continue beeping as you swim. One of the fellows who swims at our pool has a tendency to allow his to beep at him for laps on end and it can be quite annoying. I assume that it is letting him know that he has exceeded his maximum heart rate and he is attempting to drop it without stopping.

Karen Duggan
January 22nd, 2005, 11:19 PM
The POLAR heart rate monitors are really good and stay on well in the water.

Isn't there a formula where you plug in your age, etc. and that should give you your maximum heart rate? 120-150 seems slow to me(?) When I was pregnant I was told to keep my HR at 140. Often it went to 160 and I felt fine. That was my max though. I think, more than numbers, if you're in tune with your body, you'll know what's pushing too hard :)

DAP
January 23rd, 2005, 01:48 PM
Originally posted by Karen Duggan
Isn't there a formula where you plug in your age, etc. and that should give you your maximum heart rate? 120-150 seems slow to me(?) When I was pregnant I was told to keep my HR at 140. Often it went to 160 and I felt fine.

A formula I have seen is for maximum heart rate is, MHR = 220-age. And the recommended training level is around 80% of the maximum. I think it is a little simplistic because one's fitness level is not accounted for in that formula, and the amount of time spent at a particular rate is not accounted for. Some coaches (including some of mine) believe that short periods of intense exercise are beneficial. Terms like "red line" and "blow chow" are used to describe those training sets.

mjtyson
January 23rd, 2005, 06:21 PM
Originally posted by hooked-on-swimming
Michael, i will definitely do that, unfortunately, this article makes more reference to cycling, skiing and running ,just slightly mentioning swimming, but it embraces pretty much any sport where you need to pay attention to heart rate training, it also has some very interesting ideas about new way to train sportsmen based on their heart volume, heart rate, muscle weight, etc.ANyways, enjoy:


http://www.roller.ru/content/cat-181/article-1495.html
http://www.roller.ru/content/cat-181/article-1496.html

Spasibo bol'shoe!

--Mike

craiglll@yahoo.com
January 24th, 2005, 12:31 PM
It is almost impossible for me to keep my heart rate over 120/minute. About the only time I can get it up high is if I run or ride a bike. Then go to the pool and do fly. My resting rate is 60 to 62. If I begin to swim faster, my rate will increase but then drop. I was always a distance swimer and a runner. Now I almost only swim. I do sprints to get it up at times. I have a very large heart and really big lungs.

My MHR 220-46=174. I don't think I've ever had it that high!

ljodpundari
January 25th, 2005, 04:43 PM
Craig Johnson
It is almost impossible for me to keep my heart rate over 120/minute. About the only time I can get it up high is if I run or ride a bike.
Pulse rate is lower if you are lying down (the heart doesn't have to fight gravity). Being in the water cools you off, so your pulse is even lower. The references I've seen to swimming heart rate generally say to subtract about 20 bpm from your dry-land figure.

Tom

Kevin in MD
January 26th, 2005, 01:33 PM
This could be the chapters of some books.

Anyway with the hlp of babelfish I made it through both articles. Man it took a long time. Machine translated language is hard to read.

At any rate, the author states that traiing excessively at 190 bpm or over leads to cardiac dysplasia through loss of appropriate blood flow to the heart muscle.

This is the first I have heard of it. In fact in the well respected book "The Lore of Running" the mian thrust of the book develops around the central tenet that lack of oxygen to theheart muscle doesn't occur in helathy people. That it is only present in unhealthy individuals and is readily recogized as angina.

However, our tri club had a presentation from a Dr. Hari Tandri studying endurance athletes hearts at Johns Hopkins. The phenomenon in the article of the athlete's heart being very large but not contracting effectively - just rattling around was shown to us. In fact we saw an MRI video of it. He made no mention of the hypothesis that we can actually induce this condition through training. I think I'll email him.

In any case, the author states that this condition arises from a very large heart but low stroke volume as evidenced by abnormally high heart rates during exercise. Simply checking your hear trate for ten seconds after high intensity sets will be enough to stay away from the numbers this author says will bring on heart problems.

There are lots of other interesting things in these articles.

EyeoreSAM
January 26th, 2005, 03:23 PM
I have one of those polar heart rate monitors that was discussed earlier in this thread and I use it for swimming every day. The only thing is that you really do need to make it tight and for the men that don't have a suit over it, it may be quite difficult to keep it from flipping over off of your skin. I have no problem keeping my heart rate up near 90% while I am swimming (especially fly), but I don't get as high when I run--