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thisgirl13
February 3rd, 2005, 02:08 PM
Okay, okay, I'm tired of arguing weight with Aquageek and company...and Centaur brought up a very neat idea.

So answer me this, if you're so inclined to: What's your resting heartrate? There are a few who say theirs is below 55, and some who say it's right around 60.

To try and get a slightly less askew measurement, try taking it while you're sitting right here, reading this. Hopefully, you're on the computer during the day, either at work (shame on you for being on the boards at work!) or at home (I won't question that), or somewhere, and you sit down for a few minutes at least. Take your heartrate, and answer the poll, and we'll see what we come up with.

I'd start by telling you mine, but I had an asthma attack this morning, and as a result, my resting heart rate is higher, around 68 bpm's. Typically, it's 54. Stupid asthma. Makes me feel like I've been hit by a truck. :(

dorothyrde
February 3rd, 2005, 02:44 PM
Don't ask Scansy, he seems a tad bit confused......

Scansy
February 3rd, 2005, 04:50 PM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
Don't ask Scansy, he seems a tad bit confused......

I am not confused. Its just that my resting heart rate and IQ run about the same.;)

swimr4life
February 3rd, 2005, 05:08 PM
I have a question....My HR seems higher today than usual...58.. I'm very tired and did not sleep very well last night. Do you ever notice a correlation between how you feel and your HR? I sure do! Just curious.

Karlene
February 3rd, 2005, 05:39 PM
Your poll needs more options. There are some swimmers with resting heartrates as low as the mid 30's to low 40's.

fatboy
February 3rd, 2005, 05:51 PM
Originally posted by Karlene
Your poll needs more options. There are some swimmers with resting heartrates as low as the mid 30's to low 40's.
Good point. Probably quite a few!

etrain
February 3rd, 2005, 05:53 PM
swimr4life -
One year during HS we had to keep a record of our rhr and it was very interesting what you would find out about yourself. Maybe try it for a month and you will see a pattern. If you can naturally wake up and take your hr this is the best, because the alarm clock sometimes scares you and will make your hr jump. Also write down how you felt in the water and how you slept.

Mine was a little high today as well, but that is what I expected for I have started training twice as hard this week.

Keep a log and see what happens, you will learn a lot about yourself.

etrain

centaur532
February 3rd, 2005, 06:05 PM
I'm way high today. My normal range is high 60s, low 70s, but today I'm in the 80s. I have no clue why. I did receive a cortisone shot in my knee today, so I'm going to look up side effects.
(Bear in mind I haven't exercised properly in some time due to injury).

swim53
February 3rd, 2005, 07:20 PM
There are a few who say theirs is below 55 and some who say it's right around 60.
It was my thought that most master swimmers' rates would be around 55 to 59 and 50-55 when we first awaken.

swimshark
February 3rd, 2005, 07:47 PM
I have thyroid disease and ever since I got it, my rhr has been elevated. It was over 120 when I was diagnosed but is now down to the 80's with medication.

thisgirl13
February 3rd, 2005, 08:28 PM
I'm sorry, mid 30's? Most normal ranges for adults range from 60-100 beats per minute, but well-conditioned athletes (think Olympians) have a resting heart rate in the mid-to high 40's.

Not, of course, that I'm saying it isn't possible. Just, if you have a resting heartrate that's lower than 45, you must be one heck of a distance swimmer.

I'm glad everyone's playing along with this poll, I thought it might entertain Centaur a little, and provide some interesting info.

I also have a thyroid condition (hypo), but my resting heart rate is still between 52 and 60 bpm's. What kind of medication are you on, swimshark? I mean that as a serious question, not a smart remark, just in case you can't tell by simply reading the words.

centaur532
February 3rd, 2005, 08:33 PM
Originally posted by thisgirl13
I'm sorry, mid 30's? Most normal ranges for adults range from 60-100 beats per minute, but well-conditioned athletes (think Olympians) have a resting heart rate in the mid-to high 40's.

Not, of course, that I'm saying it isn't possible. Just, if you have a resting heartrate that's lower than 45, you must be one heck of a distance swimmer.

I'm glad everyone's playing along with this poll, I thought it might entertain Centaur a little, and provide some interesting info.


Agreed...I have to say, I resisted the urge to roll my eyes at the mid 30s comment. The lowest heart rate ever recorded in a human being was 32 bpm. We call that bradycardia.

Fred Johnson
February 3rd, 2005, 10:32 PM
Originally posted by centaur532
Agreed...I have to say, I resisted the urge to roll my eyes at the mid 30s comment. The lowest heart rate ever recorded in a human being was 32 bpm. We call that bradycardia.

I have been thinking a lot about heart rates so when I saw this new thread, I had to chime in. I recently started using a Polar Heart Rate Monitor. My RHR on waking up is on average 40-42. The other day, I woke up, put the Polar thing on as slowly as possible so I would not increase the HR too much. Then, I lay in bed for a few minutes to "rest" and my RHR dropped to 38. A few days later I showed my wife because she was surprised at how low it was. Once again, the monitor recorded 38. In the middle of the day sitting at my desk, my RHR is in the mid-50s. I am in good shape but not great shape. I could lose 20 lbs and should definitely workout more and skip a glass of wine/beer every now and then. But this leads me to believe that RHR may depend on a lot of factors that I have never considered.

BTW, I read once that the Tour De France riders have RHRs in the upper 20s. It sounds incredible but given their training regimens, is it impossible??

jim thornton
February 3rd, 2005, 10:34 PM
A few quick notes here.

1) some elite athletes have indeed had very low resting heart rates. Bjorn Borg's was once measured at 29; I know this will sound crazy, but there was a female marathoner whose resting h.r. was 18 or 19.

2) The latter example nothwithstanding, women tend, on average, to have higher heart rates than men--I think I've seen ranges akin to 60-80 for males; 70-90 for females (untrained.). These ranges aren't resting in the sense described below (i.e., upon first awakening, without getting out of bed.)

3) Aerobic training enlarges the inner volume of your heart's pumping chambers, allowing a single beat to move more blood--hence the training effect of lowering heart rates as you get in better shape. (You also begin to produce more plasma, so your blood volume increases--again, a slower but larger stroke volume circulates the blood you need.)

4) Anerobic training (heavy wt. lifting in particular) enlarges the thickness of the walls of the heart--an adaptation to the sometimes frighteningly high (albeit very short lived) blood pressures generated during maximal resistance exertion. One cardiac researcher told me that a world class wt. lifter had had his bp measured mid lift, and it was close to 500/300--amazing he didn't explode. (Note: bp also climbs significantly during hard aerobic exercise, but not nearly so much as with lifting. The rise is temporary and doesn't pose a health problem for otherwise healthy people--in fact, regular exercise can slightly lower resting and other non-exercising bp.)

Finally, I think a lot of this stuff has a strong genetic component. My father was in pretty good shape, but he was by no means an elite athlete--tennis a couple times a week, and that was about it. His resting heart rate was in the low 40s.

My own heart rate p.r. was 38--but I got excited about breaking the record, and I think it sped up a few beats towards the end of the minute I recorded it! I concur about measuring this first thing upon awakening, before you stand up or begin in any way to stress yourself out with the demands of the day.

I don't have brachycardia, I am pretty sure!

Fred Johnson
February 3rd, 2005, 10:46 PM
Not that I am so lazy I can't reach for the dictionary, but what is brachycardia? Saw the term and wondered.

centaur532
February 3rd, 2005, 10:55 PM
Originally posted by Fred Johnson
Not that I am so lazy I can't reach for the dictionary, but what is brachycardia? Saw the term and wondered.

Brachycardia- a heart rate slower than 60 bpm. Obviously, this is not unhealthy until you start hitting low numbers (and you're not an athlete).

Tachycardia- a heart rate 100 bpm or more. This tends to happen with albuterol, I'm sure many asthmatics on the board would tend to agree.

jim thornton
February 3rd, 2005, 11:01 PM
Not sure if this is completely kosher, but here's a snippet on resting heart rates from the Runners World (UK) site:

http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/news/article.asp?UAN=1539

Q I have an unusually low resting heart rate – with beats per minute in the mid-30s – and my doctor is a bit concerned about it. What is the normal range of resting heart rates for runners? And are there any problems associated with a low resting heart rate?

A First, because endurance athletes have strong hearts, they generally have low heart rates. As an analogy, consider a bricklayer lifting bricks. If his arm muscles are strong from lifting lots of bricks, he can move 10 bricks with each lift rather than just two or three. Similarly, if your heart muscle is strong thanks to running, it has a higher stroke volume, which means that it can pump more blood with each beat than an untrained heart. It can also pump the same amount of blood in a minute using fewer beats. The average resting heart rate of endurance athletes is around 50-60 beats per minute. I’ve seen one report, though, of a healthy athlete whose resting pulse was only 25 beats per minute.

Doctors who are familiar with athletes only get worried – and follow up accordingly – when a resting heart rate is lower than 30. But even this can be completely normal (and usually is) if the athlete is otherwise healthy. The slow heart rate indicates a strong heart, but this alone does not make you a better runner. There are too many other factors involved in running performance.

Are there any problems associated with your low heart rate? Perhaps one. It does make you more vulnerable to anything that reduces the blood flow back to the heart, such as coughing or choking on food. This occurs because the reduced blood flow causes the heart to slow down even more, to allow more time for blood to enter the heart.

And that can set off an involuntary nervous response that leads to fainting. Apart from this, provided that you have no other symptoms or complaints, your resting pulse should not concern you, or your doctor, unduly.

—Paul Thompson, cardiologist

Bob McAdams
February 4th, 2005, 12:13 AM
Originally posted by Fred Johnson
Not that I am so lazy I can't reach for the dictionary, but what is brachycardia? Saw the term and wondered.

A dictionary may not help unless you spell it correctly. The term is bradycardia.

Matthias
February 4th, 2005, 09:39 AM
My resting heart rate is quite high but it seems to vary from day to day. Some days it's just about 62 and other days I heardly get under 75. But nevertheless when I really try to relax I happend to get a low 30 and I'm quite fond of it as many people can't get their heart rate so low.

thisgirl13
February 4th, 2005, 12:29 PM
Hey everyone, it's very cool to see such an interest taken in this variable "experiment".

Jim Thornton! It's nice to see you actually on the boards for once, Coach. Now if we could only get you to stop injuring yourself. Maybe we should do a study on that too, lol. "How Jim injures himself so." Very catchy, don'tcha think?

I know there are extreme cases where heartrates are below 50-55.....but I can't change the poll, cuz I'm not a moderator. If your heartrate falls below 50, just be cool like the rest of us and put it in the first option. We'll get it.

As for the Tachycardia, I'll most definitely agree on that. Wednedsday night, in fact, as I'm sure Jim can attest to, I had a rather nasty asthma attack at practice, and poor heart was racing fit to beat all. It's been measured before during episodes like that between 180 and 195 b'spm.

Keep up the studying, kiddies!

Steph

AnnG
February 4th, 2005, 02:53 PM
Remember that your resting heart rate will be affected by that cup of coffee or tea you had this morning, also asthma medication will make it race for a long time after you use your inhaler - my daughter uses one.
Mine was 52 this morning, sitting at the desk mid-morning. Not bad.

thisgirl13
February 4th, 2005, 03:52 PM
Originally posted by AnnG
Remember that your resting heart rate will be affected by that cup of coffee or tea you had this morning, also asthma medication will make it race for a long time after you use your inhaler.

Don't I know it! I really hate using my inhaler, unless I start getting panicky, because it just screws me up for the rest of the day (or night, depending).

swimshark
February 4th, 2005, 07:44 PM
Originally posted by thisgirl13


I also have a thyroid condition (hypo), but my resting heart rate is still between 52 and 60 bpm's. What kind of medication are you on, swimshark? I mean that as a serious question, not a smart remark, just in case you can't tell by simply reading the words.

I'm on synthroid. Right now, with my pregnancy, I'm at .15 but normally it is .125. I've been on the medicine since 1995, when I was diagnosed. What about you?

lapswimmr
February 4th, 2005, 09:46 PM
70 is that good or bad???

Fred Johnson
February 4th, 2005, 09:57 PM
Originally posted by Bob McAdams
A dictionary may not help unless you spell it correctly. The term is bradycardia.

See, I knew that reaching for the dictionary would be futile. :D It is interesting to see people's RHR. A lot of inactive people I know never think about this issue (at least as far as I can tell). I have become a convert to the heart rate monitor because it seems to give you a lot of insight into what your heart is doing at rest and during exersion. Not that I always want to know that I am slacking off during exercise. But it explains a lot when I am working out and not progressing because it will often tell me that I am not working out efficiently, i.e. I am exercising but not challenging myself.

thisgirl13
February 4th, 2005, 11:31 PM
Shark,

I was diagnosed in April of 1994, and am currently also on Synthroid, at a level of .250.

The cause of my hypothyroidism is a disease known as Hashimoto's thyroiditis, an autoimmune disorder.

swimshark
February 5th, 2005, 12:02 PM
Originally posted by thisgirl13
Shark,

I was diagnosed in April of 1994, and am currently also on Synthroid, at a level of .250.

The cause of my hypothyroidism is a disease known as Hashimoto's thyroiditis, an autoimmune disorder.

I have Graves Disease. Thyroid disease in general is autoimmune. Mine came to me through my dad who has arthritis. It's all related.

I didn't know they made Synthroid that high. For some reason, I thought it stopped at .2 But it has been a while since I was staring at the "pretty" color chart of each of the dosages and their color.:D

thisgirl13
February 5th, 2005, 02:42 PM
Shark,

They don't make it any higher than .2; I take two pills, one pink and one white.

And I love the color chart! I think I've literally had every color dosage there is, since I changed doses about every three months during my recent teenage years.

My least favorite color was the .088 ones (they're seafoamy green, not as pretty as the orange ones I took for awhile, or the purple. Alas, the white are too boring.)

I figure, if you have to take medicine anyway, why not at least make it exciting? Color works for me!

Steph

p.s. Oh, and I inherited my A-I disease from my grandmother's side of the family, of which only one of her sisters has it, and no family history before that. What's strange about mine, as opposed to Grave's disease, is that Hashimoto's disease, while present at birth, usually doesn't present symptoms until a woman's mid-30's. My condition is a "hyper" version that works kind of like the movie Jack, with Robin Williams. If you haven't seen it, I'll explain. :D

craiglll@yahoo.com
February 5th, 2005, 04:55 PM
Originally posted by thisgirl13
Don't I know it! I really hate using my inhaler, unless I start getting panicky, because it just screws me up for the rest of the day (or night, depending).

Inhalers are the second leading cause of ozone loss. I use only a nebulizer. People who don't are really missing out on having much healthier lungs. with an inhaler, no matter how good your timing is you will never get the meds into your lungs as well as with a nebulizer. The new prtable ones are great. I used to go to the ER 3 times per month. I went from August 2004 to Dec 2005 with no trips.

centaur532
February 7th, 2005, 12:50 AM
Originally posted by craiglll@yahoo.com
Inhalers are the second leading cause of ozone loss. I use only a nebulizer. People who don't are really missing out on having much healthier lungs. with an inhaler, no matter how good your timing is you will never get the meds into your lungs as well as with a nebulizer. The new prtable ones are great. I used to go to the ER 3 times per month. I went from August 2004 to Dec 2005 with no trips.

People who use spacers with their inhalers benefit just as much. A spacer sends the medicine directly into the airstream, and allows 85% more medication to enter the lungs. It's also kind of hard to lug a nebulizer around. I take two medications for my asthma, and two for my allergies, and they're both under control so I have no need for a neb. Though I do know how to construct and adminster one if need be.

swimshark
February 7th, 2005, 10:36 AM
Originally posted by thisgirl13
Shark,

They don't make it any higher than .2; I take two pills, one pink and one white.


Steph

p.s. Oh, and I inherited my A-I disease from my grandmother's side of the family, of which only one of her sisters has it, and no family history before that. What's strange about mine, as opposed to Grave's disease, is that Hashimoto's disease, while present at birth, usually doesn't present symptoms until a woman's mid-30's. My condition is a "hyper" version that works kind of like the movie Jack, with Robin Williams. If you haven't seen it, I'll explain. :D

Steph, I see about the 2 pills. I think mine are a boring gray. Yuck! Graves is usually present at birth, too but does not show up until a "stressor" triggers it. For me it was my wedding (sorry to my husband!). I was diagnoed when I was only 26, which is early for Graves.

thisgirl13
February 7th, 2005, 12:31 PM
I can understand how weddings are a stress trigger, lol. My sister's getting married in August. When I was diagnosed with Hashimoto's, all my other siblings were tested for a big range of genetic diseases, because my parents were afraid something else would show up down the road and we wouldn't be prepared, or something like that. It turns out, I'm the only abnormal one of the group. I got all the wacky genes. :D

susanehr
February 9th, 2005, 09:45 AM
Maybe we should post a question about people who suffer from Thyroid problems. I was diagnosed last year with hypo and a pretty good sized goiter. (My doctor said, "My you have a large neck.") I finally went to a specialist and explained that the .05 of synthroid wasn't doing anything for me, she bumpted it up to .1. I'm doing much better. The doctor is amazed that I'm able to swim three or four times a week. She said many of her patients are sedentary.

craiglll@yahoo.com
February 9th, 2005, 10:56 AM
First, it sounds as if we are all a bunch of sickies! I'm amazed at how swimming has kept me healthy. When I ran more than swam, I wasa constantly sick & wheezing. there was a tiem that I was inthe ER constantly. The ER docs at George Washington joked tht that it should have been named for me and not Ronald Reagon (who happened to live for some of his childhood here in Glesubrg, IL.).

Second, inhalers are bad for our climate. I was recently told that an asthmatic using a standard, old-style albuterol inhaler does more damage to the ozone layer than any refrigerator. We should try to switch to the new styles that are powder. The portable nebulizer I have fits in my backpack really well. I think that it is easier than carrying the thre inhalers I used to have to hunt for when I needed to take them. I have been using it for about 5 months. Before my pulmonaid was ackward but so beneficial. My lungs hold about 9.7 liters of air. When I did my PFT last month before a treatment I had only 67% capacity. After a treatment I blew the needle off of the indicator.

swimshark
February 9th, 2005, 11:05 AM
Originally posted by susanehr
Maybe we should post a question about people who suffer from Thyroid problems. I was diagnosed last year with hypo and a pretty good sized goiter. (My doctor said, "My you have a large neck.") I finally went to a specialist and explained that the .05 of synthroid wasn't doing anything for me, she bumpted it up to .1. I'm doing much better. The doctor is amazed that I'm able to swim three or four times a week. She said many of her patients are sedentary.

Susan, I'm glad the dosage is working for you now. It does take a while to find that right magic pill amount. I think it was 8 months of diferent pills and many blood tests before I was good and even since then I've been changed 3 or 4 times. The bad part about being so active now is that I usually don't notice whenI go hypo, I have to have a blood test to tell me. When I wasn't swimming, I could easily tell.

Good luck!:)

thisgirl13
February 9th, 2005, 08:59 PM
I think it would be interesting to possibly do a discussion on swimmers with thyroid disease....though we may just bore people out of their minds, lol.

Craig's right: we really are all a bunch of sickies! I absolutely shudder to think how bad (or in the case of my asthma, better) my conditions would be if I wasn't as active as I am.

Also, as the poll thread-starter, I have to say 51 votes is TERRIBLE! I know there's more people who look at this than just 51! Come on! Do you not have heartbeats? Lol.

thisgirl13
February 9th, 2005, 09:02 PM
P.S. - Craig, we got you the first time about the inhalers. If the world was perfect, there would be no aerosol, and all asthmatics would use portable nebulizers ensconced safely in backpacks for travel. However, like the Walgreen's commercial, we don't live anywhere near Perfect, and different treatment regimens go with different asthma patients. Sorry, but there's no nebulizing over here. I will, however, take full responsibility for the depletion of the Ozone layer.

Conniekat8
February 10th, 2005, 11:27 AM
In case you guys didn't know, there are couple of excellent articles about heart rate monitoring and figuring out and cardio training on the USMS website itself:

http://www.usms.org/articles/articledisplay.php?a=109
http://www.usms.org/articles/articledisplay.php?a=110

Heidi
February 16th, 2005, 05:55 PM
Hey all, I'm new to swimming but not to exercising. I've done a lot of training using a heart rate monitor and paying close attentiont to heart rate zones. My resting is 44 on average. Heart rates do tend to vary for the slightest reasons. I used to have to check it every morning before training and some days there would be a 5-10 beat swing!

newmastersswimmer
February 22nd, 2005, 02:15 PM
I am not confused. Its just that my resting heart rate and IQ run about the same. originally posted by Scansy

Wow, I didn't realize you were in such great shape (physically that is)....J/k of course!!......(I figure that since the mourning period for the Steeler's loss is now officially over, that it's o.k. to throw a few light jabs now?)


newmastersswimmer

Scansy
February 22nd, 2005, 07:55 PM
Living in Philadelphia Eagles Land, I took more than a few light jabs after the Steelers failed to make the SB and the Eagles did make it.:( I have learned to be thick skinned.

As for the heart rate/IQ - either I'm dumb as a box but in awesome shape, or maybe I'm a fat, slob genius!

SWinkleblech
February 22nd, 2005, 07:57 PM
Scansy- Maybe you were just a little confused and it is your max heart rate that matches your IQ. Then you can be in great shape and be smart.:D

Scansy
February 25th, 2005, 07:47 PM
Originally posted by SWinkleblech
Scansy- Maybe you were just a little confused and it is your max heart rate that matches your IQ. Then you can be in great shape and be smart.:D

Gee thanks. But it is quite obvious you don't know me very well!;)

FindingMyInnerFish
June 3rd, 2006, 06:04 AM
Originally posted by fatboy
Good point. Probably quite a few!

Did mine last night or the night before, and it was lower than it's ever been.... 32.

Usually around 36-39.

But I'm still a slow runner and swimmer... go figure. Even so, it's nice at the age of 55 to have that kind of heart rate. Oops, have to raise it pretty soon. Off to run a 5k and swim my master's practice right afterward!

Have a great day, folks! :D

dvarner
June 3rd, 2006, 10:55 AM
Many moons ago I was lucky enough to spend two intense weeks at the Olympic Development Training Camp in Squaw Valley (before Colorado Springs); we had a physiologist assigned to us, I guess it was the early days of the sports medicine and bio-revolution, I figure they were starting a comprehensive data collection routine.

Anyway, he used to run around during workouts grabbing our throats during the rest intervals. He used a special wrist watch to time his counts. It was hilarious to pop up for a shortr interval and have him come up from behind and try and grab you.

As part of his regime, during every morning workout we'd stop after one hour, climb out for 5 minutes and drink orange juice and eat a pastry. We thought this was the lap of luxury, but he explained this was to see if it helped or hurt our energy output and HR in the second hour, assuming we could digest it fast enough. It wasn't always so great within the main series, in terms of digestion.....

DV

geochuck
June 4th, 2006, 09:09 PM
I woke up in the hospital after the cross Lake Ontario Swim the water temp was in the 40s and everyone had been pulled out. When I woke the doctor was taking my pulse, he said that is better 15, I multiplide by 4 and figured 4 x 15 equals 60. The doctor said no 15.

rtodd
June 7th, 2006, 04:19 PM
48 right now sitting at work. In the morning in bed it is usually in the lower 40's.

Before untreated thyroid disease (Graves) it was 80 at rest. This was also before years of intense anaerobic training.

My only complaint is that inbetween intervals, my pulse does not recover (lower) as quickly as my training partners.

A good sign of fitness is being able to get your BPM very high during exertion and then having it lower quickly.

geochuck
June 7th, 2006, 04:24 PM
Don't swim too hard in your workouts it will recover better, swim within your capabilities.