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hooked-on-swimming
March 4th, 2005, 12:09 PM
I just looked at results of Open Water World Cup 2005 in Argentina and have a hard time comprehending how you can swim that fast for that long.Anyways, as an example the first place in a 21 km. swim was won in 2:00.30.40, which roughly translates to about 10km per hour or 34.43 SECONDS per 100 meters.How in the world is that possible?Can the current really help you out that much and out of curiousity what would you think that speed would translate into in the pool?In other words how fast would a swimmer like that swim 1500m. in a pool?

Rob Copeland
March 4th, 2005, 03:52 PM
Yes, current does make a big difference. Consider the Manhattan Island Marathon Swim where the record is 6:32:41 (the fastest individual swim is a little faster than 6 hours). The record swim by Tobie Smith in 1999 averaged just less than 40 seconds per 100 yards. While her winning NCAA mile championship time in 1994 was 16:07 (closer to 58 sec/100).

The top menís marathon swimmers are around 15:30 1500 Meter swimmers.

hooked-on-swimming
March 5th, 2005, 02:28 AM
I can only imagine how fast it feels going at such a speed, must be a heavenly sensation, I never tried that kind of a swim(well, I am not trained enough to handle long distances yet), but would love to try it out sometime.

Rob Copeland
March 5th, 2005, 10:29 AM
River swimming is a rather amazing sensation. Your speed relative to the water is the same as in a pool, so there is no feel of speed in the water. However, as you look around to spot or breath you see buildings and people on shore whizzing by at 2 to 3 times the normal pace. Itís a bit disorienting at first, but then you just go with the flow:)

I remember swimming up the East River in NYC and marveling at the speed at which the United Nations Building and Yankee Stadium flew by and how quickly we shot under the historic bridges of New York. Or watching as I caught and passed a person running along the sea wall.

craiglll@yahoo.com
March 5th, 2005, 11:36 AM
Originally posted by Rob Copeland
River swimming is a rather amazing sensation. Your speed relative to the water is the same as in a pool, so there is no feel of speed in the water. However, as you look around to spot or breath you see buildings and people on shore whizzing by at 2 to 3 times the normal pace. Itís a bit disorienting at first, but then you just go with the flow:)

I remember swimming up the East River in NYC and marveling at the speed at which the United Nations Building and Yankee Stadium flew by and how quickly we shot under the historic bridges of New York. Or watching as I caught and passed a person running along the sea wall.

I used to live in DC. I would run through Rock Creek to the Goergetown boathouse. Put my shoes & t-shirt somewhere. then swim to roosevelt Island throught he current. Whe I was young we would swim across the Mississippi at Galdstone or Oquaka. River swimming is great.

hooked-on-swimming
March 5th, 2005, 12:00 PM
I just realised I would have a better chance in triathlon if I wanted to try myself out there...I was amazed that good triathlonists(olimpic size) swim 1.5 km in 18 min having to bike and run afterwards, now I realize it isn't really the 18min. of pool swimming I was thinking about, what would 18min. in open water translate into in the pool?

Kevin in MD
March 7th, 2005, 02:45 PM
Triathlons are mosat often held in a lake or other still body of water. Notable exception would be the NYC triathlon and any beach triathlon in which they would swim with the longshore current.

But in 90% of the races, that 18 minute swim really is an 18 minute swim.

If the race is an age group race and not a professional race, then the athletes are most likely wearing neoprene wetsuits which increase speed by 2 to 5 seconds per 100 M over pool speed for top swimmers. So an 18 minute wetsuit swim in a tri corresponds to a 19 minute pace or so.

It does vary with swimming style and so forth but in general someone swimming 18 in a wetsuit at a tri can swm 19 or so in the pool.

Also, triathlon swim courses aren't accurate to the meter. Not uncommon for them to be off by up to 100 meters.

Guvnah
March 10th, 2005, 02:15 PM
Originally posted by hooked-on-swimming
I just realised I would have a better chance in triathlon if I wanted to try myself out there...I was amazed that good triathlonists(olimpic size) swim 1.5 km in 18 min having to bike and run afterwards, now I realize it isn't really the 18min. of pool swimming I was thinking about, what would 18min. in open water translate into in the pool?

Seems to me that 18 minutes of swimming is 18 minutes of swimming. You might get farther in those 18 minutes (or less far if you are swimming against the current) but the effort and calories expended, etc., will be about the same for any 18 minute swim.

I once participated a study at the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs. All the swimming was done in their flume. I stayed stationary, and the water movement was changed. (One of the tests started me out at my base aerobic rate, and then every 10 seconds the water speed was cranked up another notch. My job was to pick up the pace each time I heard the turbines whirr a little louder, and just stay over the mark at the bottom of the flume. I was to do this until I crumpled in exhaustion. They were monitoring my breathing intake and CO2 expelled...) In terms of physical/spatial movement, I didn't move a single yard. But you can imagine that I put in a good workout for each of these sessions nonetheless!

hooked-on-swimming
March 12th, 2005, 02:38 AM
I did not exactly meant that you'd be tired more or less in 18 min. of swimming in a pool or open water.I just thought that maybe a triathlonist swimming 1.5km in 18 min. in open water would spend more time to cover the same distanse in a pool(considering the current, but as it was explained earlier, the swim is mostly performed in a lake with no "help" from a current)

geochuck
March 26th, 2005, 11:30 AM
First 20 miles of the Sagueney river swim with a river current and a 22' tide (Chicotimi to Port Alfred Quebec) took 2 to 2 and a half hours the last 8 miles took up to 7hrs against the 22' out flow tide.

George