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Alex
May 24th, 2005, 07:05 PM
I do not know if this expression (float dead) it is well undertood in English, and may be the fact that I can not "float dead" is kind of ridiculous for some of you (for me too), but even when I have been master swimming for over 13 years now (practicing 6 days a week), and I have participated in many open water meets in my life, and some of them I have wan at my edge group (35-39).... even so I still can not play as float dead (face up) with my body, neither in a pool or on the sea.

I can do it with a pull buoy in my ancles but with out it, my feet just sink.

My both children can float dead easily since they were little (4 years old) and I show them how to do it, but I canīt, is it not funny?

Anyone have a tip?:confused:

dorothyrde
May 24th, 2005, 07:48 PM
Some people just cannot. I cannot, even when I weighed 30 pounds more than now. It takes about 10 seconds for my feet to sink, unless I kick them. My kids are the same way, they don't float. Someone told me it is due to dense bones, I have no idea if that is true, just know I can't float.

A few years ago, the Master's coach decided to see who were sinkers and who were floaters in the group. About half of us sank, but it was not dependant on bodyfat.

geochuck
May 24th, 2005, 08:51 PM
I have seen flat floaters angle floaters and sinkers. Most of us angle float. My brother floated at a depth of 7 feet. I float flat on the surface. Even when I was skinny I floated easy.

I had one person who wanted to learn to swim because he fell out of a boat on the grand river, went to the bottom and walked out. I put floats on him and still went to the bottom. I told him don't go near the water.

George

SWinkleblech
May 24th, 2005, 10:27 PM
I think it has a lot to do with body mass. If you have more muscle I think you tend to sink more. Fat actually floats better. Also the more tense you are the more tendency you will have to sink.

craiglll@yahoo.com
May 25th, 2005, 11:32 AM
I think that almost anyone can float. I knew a guy who were being "supported" by anohtjer person's one finger. Then when the finger was removed, the guy wudl sink. I think a lot has to do with how your arms & legs are positioned. I can float completely at the surface with out problems. I can float underwater if I bend my knees. I used to know a guy who could eat while he was floating.

SwiminONandON
May 25th, 2005, 11:35 AM
Swim lesson #1 from my dad at our lake house circa 5 years old ... float on your back Heather. Water came in my mouth I started choking and freaked out ... this went on for quite sometime...

Tom Ellison
May 25th, 2005, 11:42 AM
For years the US Military taught water survival with two categories of people:
1. Floater
2. Sinker

They determine what group you fall into by placing you in a pool with swim trunks....on your belly.....relax....take a deep breath......if you float...that is what you are...if you sink...that is what you are....in this exercise their are no in-betweens. You will either sink or float.

Scansy
May 25th, 2005, 11:46 AM
I hear they do something similar in the air force..... levitate or come crashing down to earth!:eek:

ande
May 25th, 2005, 11:48 AM
Alejandro,

it's simple physics,
your body is heavier than the amount of water it displaces
so you SINK,
there are no quick tips or techiniques to change that
other than breathe in as much air as you can and hold it while you attempt to float.

If you really want to be able to float
you need to gain FAT and or lose muscle.

if you really want to do this
1) stop working out,
2) increase what you eat,
3) lose muscle
4) gain fat
5) as you lose muscle and gain fat and weight,
test your floating ability at some point
you'll float like a champ.

ande


Originally posted by Alex
I do not know if this expression (float dead) it is well undertood in English, and may be the fact that I can not "float dead" is kind of ridiculous for some of you (for me too), but even when I have been master swimming for over 13 years now (practicing 6 days a week), and I have participated in many open water meets in my life, and some of them I have wan at my edge group (35-39).... even so I still can not play as float dead (face up) with my body, neither in a pool or on the sea.

I can do it with a pull buoy in my ankles but with out it, my feet just sink.

My both children can float dead easily since they were little (4 years old) and I show them how to do it, but I canīt, is it not funny?

Anyone have a tip?:confused:

Karen Duggan
May 25th, 2005, 11:57 AM
Try pressing your chest toward the bottom, it will pick your hips up, and hold your breath.

geochuck
May 25th, 2005, 11:58 AM
Also some have larger lung capacity than others. When my lung capacity was tested by U of Wisconcin they said I had the largest lung capacity they had ever tested til that time. they tested for floating ability also and they told me that was the reason I was a floater.

Karen Duggan
May 25th, 2005, 12:47 PM
My husband's lungs are huge too. At least a full liter larger than men his size! No wonder he has such great pulldowns and won't get off the phone! Oh, did I say that out loud :p

scyfreestyler
May 25th, 2005, 03:27 PM
Kill yourself? J/K!

Don't feel bad, I have a hard time floating for any length of time as well. I think my problem is lack of body fat. At 6-0 165 I have very little fat to keep me afloat.

Susan
May 25th, 2005, 09:00 PM
Think of your lungs as your center of buoyancy. Try to balance your weight on either side of your lungs. As Karen said, hold your breath and press on your chest, then raise your arms over your head to put more weight on the top half to counteract the weight of your legs. A lot of people who think they can't float just aren't balancing right. I suppose there are people who don't have the lung capacity to support the weight of a lot of muscle.

dorothyrde
May 25th, 2005, 10:13 PM
But some people it just does not work. I understand the balance thing, have played around with it, worked on it, had coaches work on it, and I sink. My kids are built very lean and muscular, and they are the same way. I think it has a lot to do with body composition. It does not prevent me from swimming, and I can get my legs to the surface with a gentle kick, but I cannot do a dead mans float. My legs sink within 10 secs. Even on my back, they sink and fast. I have played around with my daughters balance in the water, and it is the same thing. One coaches theory was dense bones. At my age.....I hope so, women need dense bones!

Alex
May 26th, 2005, 12:50 PM
Thanks to all of you for your replays.

Many things confort me now:

- I can ask a question related to water and get good replays in this forum.
- I have some new ideas to try on my problem.
- there are other swimmers out there that have the same problem than me, this is because even when I know that in my team many people can not float as I, I think it is just because they do not relax good enough, I do relax and I even stay calm untill my feet get to the bottom of the pool, but after 80 seconds of holding the air I just realice I am not going to float in that position, I am going to try tomorrow morning what Susan is saying.;)

I do not have much fat in my body but I neither want to follow Andeīs advise this time, I think more on what Susan is saying because one thing I can do related to floating is to float face down, but I can do this for less than 90 seconds because then I run out of air.

Thanks again to all:)

geochuck
May 26th, 2005, 01:06 PM
Alex

I swam at the 1955 Pan Am Games Mexico, the pool was unique, the Library beautiful and the Sombrero Stadium amazing to enter. with a large crowd. Are they still there?

Are you using the full capacity of your lungs? Have you dropped the diaphram? I would not suggest you hold your breath fo 90 seconds. I get a head ache.

Alex
May 26th, 2005, 01:39 PM
Originally posted by geochuck
Alex

I swam at the 1955 Pan Am Games Mexico, the pool was unique, the Library beautiful and the Sombrero Stadium amazing to enter. with a large crowd. Are they still there?

Are you using the full capacity of your lungs? Have you dropped the diaphram? I would not suggest you hold your breath fo 90 seconds. I get a head ache.

Yes, the pool still there, and everything else, but the pool it is not what it used to be, I swan there a couple year ago in a meet, and although the water quality was fine, everything else seems old now. In countries like Mexico there is not much budget for sports, except when we are going to host international games.

Let me tell you that for the Olympics games at 1968, the goverment had to impose a tax for every car in the country, well that tax was supposed to finance the Olympic games, but the tax still effective untill now and everyone with a car have to pay it every year (about 5% of the value of the car).

Anyhow, we do have many good private clubs like the Y or the one that I practice in: http://www.casablanca.com.mx/body/index.php

About the question of my lungs capacity, yes it is my full.

craiglll@yahoo.com
May 26th, 2005, 02:53 PM
As many know, I have asthma. My lung capacity is 72% of predicted value fopr my age & heigth. However, that is 9 liters. I used to have 13.5 liters. I loved getting my PFTs with the old machines that looked like refrigerators becaseu the technician would have to change the bell that held the air. The new machies are really computers tht simply measure the amount of air that passes through the tube.

Another thing that has changed. It used to be that many of the techs were retired navy guys who worked with Navy divers. I swear there were three different guys in DC working at different hospitals who were retired navy. What was really odd about them was that they all wore wigs. One was at the old Group Health office on Pennsyvania Ave., one at the Adventis Hospital in Tacoma Park, and the other worked for a private doctor in Silver Spring. I always wondered if wearing a wig was a job requirement!