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hooked-on-swimming
May 31st, 2005, 09:10 PM
Check out this video:

http://www.planetfreedive.dk/World%20Record%20166%20meter%20256kbWM9.wmv

That is very impressive...

tjrpatt
May 31st, 2005, 10:01 PM
this guy has gils. I am ready to have a heartache after 25 yards. I guess that he was able to do it by little movement under the water.

Bob McAdams
May 31st, 2005, 10:39 PM
I used to do a lot of underwater swimming (though never for anywhere near that distance). What I found was that I could cover the most distance on one breath by swimming slowly. This was contrary to my instincts, which told me that the faster I swam, the less time I'd have to go without air, and therefore the better off I'd be. But what I found was that swimming faster reduced the amount of time I could go without air by more than it increased my speed.

fanstone
May 31st, 2005, 10:57 PM
It is a balance between how far, how fast, and how long you will last with the oxygen you have in your lungs. The faster you go, the less time you will last. To do a 25 meter pool, or even there and back, you got to dose your underwater swimming. To snorkel and then dive deep is also an art that requires just the right amount of efffort to get the job done and yet have enough time to spend underwater. This is better felt in scuba diving where beginners and/or "heavier" divers use up their air in about 30 minutes versus the 40 to 45 minutes the same amount of air lasts for the better divers.
Darn! I was writing this while downloading the video. I just saw it. The guy is incredible. I thought it was one of the Pippin type records, the 180 meter depth record, one of those. Sh...t....I've done a pool and a half, in my younger days, I can still do the complete 25 meters and comeback partially to around 5 or 10, but the 166 meters is truly awesome. I wonder how far Pippin and his predecessor (the guy of the "Deep Blue" movie ) would have gone in their prime. billy fanstone.

ande
May 31st, 2005, 11:06 PM
Tanya Streeter is one of the best free divers in the world
as well as being exceptionally easy on the eyes

http://www.redefineyourlimits.com/

here's the world records for that crazy sport
http://www.aida-international.org/current_world_records.htm

geochuck
June 1st, 2005, 12:10 AM
And I thought I was good 55 years ago swimming underwater for 125 yards. This guy is good.

Leonard Jansen
June 1st, 2005, 07:37 AM
Kind of sad that this guy does this amazing world record and, at best, there are only a few people there to see it. A lonely sport, indeed.

On another note (no pun intended), does anyone have an idea of who the music that accompanied this is by?

-LBJ

aquageek
June 1st, 2005, 08:13 AM
I wonder if it would be harder or easier in a 50 m pool? The multiple pushoffs provider greater speed but also require more effort.

fatboy
June 1st, 2005, 10:20 AM
Dima, Thanks for the post. That was amazing!



Originally posted by geochuck
And I thought I was good 55 years ago swimming underwater for 125 yards. This guy is good.

George 125 yds IS good. Were you wearing fins?

geochuck
June 1st, 2005, 11:18 AM
Originally posted by fatboy
George 125 yds IS good. Were you wearing fins?
No fins but I did cheat a little maybe more then a little. Our pool had a three foot ledge separating the deep end from the shallow end. 5' deep on the shallow side , 9 ' on the other side. When I pushed off from the end of the pool I would grab the ledge and get an extra push off with my feet, 2 push offs for every 25 yards.

There was another swimmer from our club, Ted StAubin (held the Canadian record for breaststroke) who equalled the distance, I don't know if he cheated or not. I still had a headache after the underwater swim.

jswim
June 1st, 2005, 11:28 AM
Originally posted by fatboy
Dima, Thanks for the post. That was amazing!




George 125 yds IS good. Were you wearing fins?

I couldn't get the link, but 166 meters is outstanding! wow!!.. and yes, George, 125 yds is great!

Alex
June 1st, 2005, 12:27 PM
I notice that he did hold his breath the all 2:30 minutes that he took for the 166 meters, with out droping a single air buble, I allways let out a little bit of air every few meters when I do underwater distance diving.

I guess I was wrong on my believe.

What do you people think about it?

SwiminONandON
June 1st, 2005, 12:36 PM
You should exhale your CO2

fatboy
June 1st, 2005, 01:03 PM
Originally posted by jswim
I couldn't get the link, but 166 meters is outstanding! wow!!.. and yes, George, 125 yds is great!

I couldn't get the link so I went to the site

http://www.planetfreedive.dk

and navigated to the video. It's not in English but look for the 166m.

Guvnah
June 1st, 2005, 01:07 PM
Wow. The guy sure looks efficient in his stroke. And 5 stroke cycles per 25m length (plus push off wall.) I'll have to count how many I do per 25yd...

I have never been able to master a graceful turn, though. Man, he makes it look so easy! Maybe just seeing that video will give me the confidence to make a successful turn that doesn't consume the rest of my air...

fanstone
June 1st, 2005, 01:10 PM
CO2 is only a problem in your blood, not in your lungs. Exhaling won't diminish the C02 content of your blood. You would have to exhale repeatedly to get rid of excess C02. As a matter of fact, the increase in pC02 in your blood is what makes you want to breathe, not the oxygen content. That is why it is a mental game. The only danger is when you get so good at resisting the urge to breathe, when your C02 builds up, and eventually you DO have a problem with lack of oxygen, which will kill you. The C02 will eventually increase your acidosis, but not in that short a period of the apneia. I use to blow out some air, but after reading a lot, it seems reasonable to hold on to the air in your lungs for as long as you can, since the residual oxygen will be uplifted to the blood. That will help you to not pass out, but it won't prevent your need to breathe. billy fanstone

Tom Ellison
June 1st, 2005, 02:00 PM
Very, very dangerous stuff this is! I knew a guy in Rochester, NY in 1971 that was a pretty good swimmer and he darn near died from this stuff....and had he not had great friends in the pool while doing this...he would have died....My take, this should ONLY be attempted with people who know first aid....watching you every step of the way. Other then that, you are really asking for the box!
I also knew an off shore free air - deep diver who was world class and he came up in the Med. off Italy in a world class event with blood in his mask...near dead....Very dangerous stuff only for the careful and well trained!

jswim
June 1st, 2005, 02:56 PM
Originally posted by fatboy
I couldn't get the link so I went to the site

http://www.planetfreedive.dk

and navigated to the video. It's not in English but look for the 166m.

Thanks for the link it worked on that one, and HOLY CRAP! hearing about it is one thing, watching it happen is quite another!

Very impressive!

knelson
June 1st, 2005, 03:44 PM
When I do underwater no breathers it seems like as soon as I start exhaling it's just about game over. Not sure exactly why, but that's the way it feels. I always thought a 50 meter long course underwater was a pretty good challenge. Not sure I could do it now. The 125 yards George did is amazing. I could never do more than 75.

Guvnah
June 1st, 2005, 04:13 PM
I'm curious about the way he fills his lungs before he starts. It's like he's forcing more air into his lungs than a normal breath would take.

Guppigirl
June 1st, 2005, 04:26 PM
To the person who asked...the song is "All I Need" by Air off of their album Moon Safari, one of my favorites!

-GG

aquageek
June 1st, 2005, 04:28 PM
I have to admit it is truly amazing to watch this but SO WHAT. I don't get the point at all of this sport. There doesn't appear to be anything safe about it. I watched a documentary on it and half the people that came up from an ocean dive were unconscious and one person (a lady maybe) actually died.

I did attempt my own manly feat of strength one day by trying to swim a 50 underwater. Unfortunately, I pushed off too low on the wall and cut my knee. I didn't get any sypathy from the fairer sex for my endeavor. Come to think of it, beer was involved as well.

Tom Ellison
June 1st, 2005, 04:41 PM
Geek, you have a tremendous talent for putting things in their proper perspective. From what my friend who competed in free air - deep dives told me, this sport is as dangerous as they get, and when things go wrong, they usually go very wrong, often with fatal consequences. Gosh, some of these world class free air deep divers have been down to 700 feet or so (donít hold me to that number, but it sticks in my mind), and that is way over the edge of safety in my book.
I am not saying they should not do this....I am saying I can think of much better ways to go in the box then this stuff....

Tom Ellison
June 1st, 2005, 05:08 PM
I looked on the web and the deepest I found was in 2002 in the No-Limit Class...which uses weights to get down and a float bag to get back to the top...around 485 feet...Wow...

knelson
June 1st, 2005, 05:24 PM
Yeah, these deep free dives are insane, but I can see the appeal of what this guy did. At least if this guy passes out he's three feet below the surface. When the free divers pass out they're 400 feet down. This seems like a big difference in my book.

geochuck
June 1st, 2005, 05:30 PM
Originally posted by Guvnah
I'm curious about the way he fills his lungs before he starts. It's like he's forcing more air into his lungs than a normal breath would take. I have seen this same action by the East Germans and a couple of Dutch swimmers. It appears he is swallowing air into his stomuch and also filling his lungs. It also appears that he has a weight around his neck to help keep under the water.

Guvnah
June 2nd, 2005, 01:14 PM
But what good is air in your stomach? Especially if the added buoyancy causes you the need to wear a weight around your neck...

geochuck
June 2nd, 2005, 01:23 PM
Fulcrum of the body changes. Helps the legs stay flatter. As some one else said weight loading above the fulcrum.

BillS
June 2nd, 2005, 06:43 PM
I like to swim an underwater 25 every now and then to work on breath capacity and control. Like Bob McAdams, I assumed that faster was better for getting there. I usually can only do them consistently at the beginning of the workout, when I'm fresh.

I was amazed by how slowly, calmly, and deliberately this guy moved.

So I tried it today at the end of the workout. Took a few deep breaths, and concentrated on going slowly and easily, working the glide. Result: No problem doing 25's, even when dog-tired.

I have no idea what this means for my swimming, but it was kind of a cool swimdown.

geochuck
June 2nd, 2005, 07:02 PM
Our coach had us swim under water during water polo practices, our pool was 15 yards across and we did 15 of these trying to do it with one full pull underwater stroke.

msgrupp
June 2nd, 2005, 07:35 PM
Did you mean Air SUPPLY for the artists on the song "All I need is the air that I breathe"?

I believe I met the composer back in the early 80s. In fact, if it's the right guy--he sold my sister his dining room table (while in CA) and she's still using it 20+ years later!

Is the composer "Norman" something?

jim clemmons
June 2nd, 2005, 08:48 PM
Originally by Geek:


Come to think of it, beer was involved as well.


Beer's probably what started you off on the endeavor as well.

:)

breastroker
June 2nd, 2005, 08:57 PM
I thought this was very interesting. I thought he kept his head loo low for best streamline.

Obviously has a good breaststroke kick, but his push off streamline could be better. And I actually feel a regular breaststroke done underwater is more efficient than continuous pulldowns.

The Japanese used to stay underwater for up to five minutes in the 1950's, thay swam the 200 meter breast with 5-6 total breaths.

Best I ever did was 100 yards as a kid (16) underwater, but that was before asthma. But at swim meets I ALWAYS swim at least 4 seperate lengths underwater to open up the lungs, and I never breathe out.

When I was young I was taught to exhale during the underwater stroke, but now I never do.

Phil Arcuni
June 2nd, 2005, 09:09 PM
I had two ideas for why to fill up the stomach with air:

An extra supply. I bet that if you practice it you could mix the stomach air and the lung air while underwater.

or, perhaps there is some (small) O2 absorption in the stomach lining or small intestine. If you could push it in there . . .

Both options require remarkable and somewhat disgusting control of one's internal muscles. But if anyone could do it, this guy looks like he could.

knelson
June 2nd, 2005, 11:32 PM
Originally posted by msgrupp
Did you mean Air SUPPLY for the artists on the song "All I need is the air that I breathe"?

:D
No, the group is Air. They're a modern French electronic duo. "Air That I Breathe" was by The Hollies, not Air Supply.