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jswim
June 9th, 2005, 12:54 PM
ok, this is the second time in the past two weeks I've not been able to go swim due to thunderstorm activity.

Now don't get me wrong.. I LOOOOOVE Thunderstorms, but not being able to swim when you've looked forward to doing so since the previous evening is just no fun at all. :mad:

I was literally out the building and on my way to the Y when an clap of thunder abruptly stopped me in my tracks.. I just turned right around and went back into the building. (and onto the discussion boards of course! lol)

Anyone else go to indoor pools that close during storms? In Oklahoma during spring and early summer it sometimes ends up being like a hail mary to decide to go to practice in hopes that there won't be a storm.:rolleyes:

Heidi
June 9th, 2005, 01:09 PM
Wait, they closed your indoor pool? Our outdoor one closes every once in awhile for lightening storms. I swam while it hailed yesterday...interesting with inch round balls pelting me in the face.

aquageek
June 9th, 2005, 01:13 PM
I'm glad someone brought this up because this is right up there with noodlers as an annoyance for me. The lifeguards at the pools around here are totally obsessed with thunder and lightning to the point they will position their chairs near a window during any rain and crane their neck to look for lightning. I have been told to get out of a pool due to a nearby train and dark clouds with no rain whatsoever.

Don't get me wrong, you should not swim during thunderstorms but it is taken to the extreme here. Now, I do know of at least one pool that has some sort of lightning detector for a 5 mile radius. That way they only evacuate the pool in the event of a true nearby storm. That seems like a nifty device.

Guvnah
June 9th, 2005, 01:21 PM
Originally posted by Heidi
Wait, they closed your indoor pool? Our outdoor one closes every once in awhile for lightening storms.

I'm with Heidi. I haven't ever experienced an indoor pool getting closed due to lightning, and I live in the Pikes Peak region -- the 3rd most lightning prone area in the country (behind Fla, and some part of Texas that escapes me right now.)

sibleyclan
June 9th, 2005, 01:29 PM
I know the (indoor) pool where I swim makes the age group swimmers get out during thunderstorms. I haven't been swimming long enough to know if it's a general rule or just for the kids. The way summers are in NC, I should find out any day now!!

aquageek
June 9th, 2005, 01:29 PM
I swim in predominantly indoor pools and they are closed ALL THE TIME!

swimrat
June 9th, 2005, 01:38 PM
I was a lifeguard at both an indoor pool and an outdoor pool. And the rules were farily similary to both regarding lighting. Indoor pools would get hit just like any other building and water inside it makes it that much more dangerous. Anytime we would see lighting we would time it from the time we saw it for 10-15 mintues. Every time another one would come we would start the time over again until the storm passed or if there wasn't any more lighting but still raining and such. This was the same with the outdoor pool. Two totally different places, so I don't know if it's writtin down somewhere if that's what you should do or if that was a coincoidence (sp). Tis for your safety only.

Kelli,

jswim
June 9th, 2005, 01:39 PM
Originally posted by Guvnah
I'm with Heidi. I haven't ever experienced an indoor pool getting closed due to lightning, and I live in the Pikes Peak region -- the 3rd most lightning prone area in the country (behind Fla, and some part of Texas that escapes me right now.)

yeah, I never experienced this for an indoor pool before I moved out here. I grew up in Connecticut, and went to school in Florida and never heard of it. I did find an article about lightning and indoor issues, and apparently is is a "slight" risk to the swimmers, but more of an issue with anyone near some sort of conductor that would lead indoors directly from outside. However, there have been no reported incidents of people getting either hurt, or killed while in an indoor pool during a storm..

frustrating when you want to work out.

aquageek
June 9th, 2005, 01:56 PM
It's complete nonsense to evacuate an indoor pool as an indoor pool is really no different from any office building. I read this same report that says lightning can travel on electrical or plumbing circuits. If that's the case, then we should also evacuate office buildings and not allow people to use the bathrooms during a lightning storm. If lightning can travel through circuits at a pool, it can just as easily travel through a computer, a light fixture, a water fountain, etc, at an office park.

But, when you consider every lightning stike gives the teenage guard staff 30 minutes of socializing instead of guarding, you can easily see why lightning strikes are so popular with them.

jswim
June 9th, 2005, 02:02 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
It's complete nonsense to evacuate an indoor pool as an indoor pool is really no different from any office building. I read this same report that says lightning can travel on electrical or plumbing circuits. If that's the case, then we should also evacuate office buildings and not allow people to use the bathrooms during a lightning storm. If lightning can travel through circuits at a pool, it can just as easily travel through a computer, a light fixture, a water fountain, etc, at an office park.

But, when you consider every lightning stike gives the teenage guard staff 30 minutes of socializing instead of guarding, you can easily see why lightning strikes are so popular with them.

I fully agree, I was thinking the EXACT same thing as I was sitting in my cube farm surrounded by electrical conductors and large windows behind me! lol.. I thought it was silly too.

Tom Ellison
June 9th, 2005, 02:04 PM
Hey Geek...the difference is sitting in an office chair is MUCH different then swimming IN WATER....trust me.....you can get fried big time if lightning hits the indoor pool in the wrong place....

Lightning hit the alum. umbrella that sat on top of the lifeguard chair at the pool I swam at as a kid....the underwater pump room sat just below the lifeguard chair....HAD anyone been in the pump room they would have go nailed for it blew out many of the bolts, pipes etc....

Lightning is NOTHING to mess with....

having said that, Geek, you are right...sometimes they do go a bit overboard closing the pool.....

flipper79
June 9th, 2005, 02:18 PM
Our practice has been shortened 2X this week already. (outdoor pool) Someone stated doubt regarding lightning traveling into a building through water pipes. There have been many accounts of people being hit by lightning while in the shower or bath. It doesn't happen every day but it does happen.

aquageek
June 9th, 2005, 02:23 PM
I'm not denying lightning is a force du jour but common sense dictates you don't close an indoor pool when there is a lightning strike two counties over.

Speaking of lightning, I need some help to resolve a dispute. When you are caught on a golf course in a bad storm and can't make it back to the clubhouse, do you A) stay on the fairway outside your cart or B) stay in your cart on the fairway or C) go under the trees in your cart or D) go under the trees outside your cart? I see pros and cons of each approach. You stay on the course you are the tallest thing around. You go under the trees you are the grounding point for them.

shoalsswimmer
June 9th, 2005, 02:28 PM
Good swimming related forum - my local Y freaks whenever lightning is around too. They will close the indoor pool for 45 minutes after a lightning strike. I don't really know about the procedure for successive strikes after that. Some of my swimming excursions have been thwarted on more than one occasion. If it is clouldy and the chance of a storm arises, I call ahead and ask if they are open then take my chances.

One word of advice to anyone who gets let down at an indoor pool because of lightning, especially at a Y; take along some clothes for getting in some dryland work - treadmill, weights, something.

One 5:30 AM workout with my masters team, we got booted out after about 200 yards of warm up. It was 5:35 AM, what to do? Go home and go back to bed or shower and go to work. Got an extra hour and a half of sleep that day.

Lightning scares me, so if they close and that's the policy, so be it. Live another day and make up the missed workout.

sibleyclan
June 9th, 2005, 02:33 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
When you are caught on a golf course in a bad storm and can't make it back to the clubhouse, ...

According to Lee Trevino: "In case of a thunderstorm, stand in the middle of the fairway and hold up a one iron. Not even God can hit a one iron."

On subject, I've heard that you should get out of and away from the cart, staying on the ground. That makes it taller than you. I'm not willing to put this to the test myself, however!

Bob McAdams
June 9th, 2005, 03:41 PM
Originally posted by jswim
there have been no reported incidents of people getting either hurt, or killed while in an indoor pool during a storm...

To put things in perspective: There have been millions of cases of people dying because they didn't get enough exercise.

Tom Ellison
June 9th, 2005, 03:58 PM
Bob, your pragmatism cracks me up....and you are right!

aztimm
June 9th, 2005, 04:17 PM
During our summer monsoon season here in AZ (usually July-August), it is quite common to have evening practice cancelled due to lightning. When I lived in Tucson a few years ago, I got very frustrated after getting only 2 workouts one week, so went in the mornings for a while. Back here in Tempe, I now swim in the morning and it gets cancelled once in a while...maybe 2-3 times a year at most.

We had a delay getting in the pool this morning because one of the lifeguards overslept. Evidently, it is not good enough to have just 1 and our coach. I have no idea what the lifeguards do there, but the 1 time when someone actually had a problem they freaked out and the coach had to do handle the situation.

SwiminONandON
June 9th, 2005, 04:21 PM
Tim that's very strange our practice was delayed this morning b/c the lifeguards forgot to show up. The coach called and they told her we were getting in until the guards showed up. She said oh yes we are (the age groupers swim then too). It was awesome. Some very sleepy looking lifeguards showed up a little bit later.

SwiminONandON
June 9th, 2005, 04:23 PM
Oh, and if my morning practices are going to be canceled it darn well better be thundering and lightening like mad out when I wake-up at 5am or else I'd be really pissed.

jim clemmons
June 9th, 2005, 04:37 PM
When I was coaching in the early 70's, there was an approaching lightning/thunder storm while the kids were working out (outdoor pool).

We continued to watch as it basically developed right on top of us with this beautiful display.

Then a strike hit one of the light standards, blew out the lamp and scared the crap out of us.

We got the kids out and sent 'em to the showers which, after reading the plumbing connection comments, may not have been the appropriate thing to do.

But everyone lived so what the heck.

SwiminONandON
June 9th, 2005, 04:42 PM
Originally posted by jim clemmons
But everyone lived so what the heck. [/B]


That and Ande's lugging lard comment are seriously the two best things I've heard all day ...

I have actually heard that you aren't suppose to shower during storms ...

msgrupp
June 9th, 2005, 05:05 PM
There was an incident a few years ago here in Pittsburgh where (I think) 4 Asian doctors were on a golf course. They stood under a tree during a storm and it was hit. I believe at least 3 of them died. At my doctor's office (who had been the sponsor), there was a memorial plaque to these doctors. They had been to PIttsburgh as part of an international orthopedics training session.

Kevin in MD
June 9th, 2005, 05:24 PM
I find it preposterous to think the electricity from a lightning strike would pass from the earth (ground) to the pipes and then back into the earth.


I JUSt sent a message about this ot the folks i coach. The indoor pool closes, yes it's ridiculous.

Much higher risk of being on the phone, yet do you think the the sales people will stay off the phone during a lightning storm? That's rhetorical.

If the pool is closed, the showers should also be closed for the same reasons the pool is closed. They don't close the showers either.

aquageek
June 9th, 2005, 05:42 PM
One indoor pool I swim at yells at us to stay out of the showers when they close the pool. The other one does nothing about the showers. Further proof no one really knows a lick about this topic.

I've experienced thundersnow a time or two. I wonder if they close the pool for that?

Rob Copeland
June 9th, 2005, 06:16 PM
According to National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statement: Lightning Safety for Athletics and Recreation:

Over the past century, lightning has consistently been 1 of the top 3 causes of weather-related deaths in this country. It kills approximately 100 people and injures hundreds more each year.
Lightning casualty statistics from Colorado demonstrate that the most common sites for fatalities were open fields (27%), near trees (16%), and close to water (13%). Statistics from the country as a whole mimic the numbers from Colorado. Open fields, ballparks, and playgrounds accounted for nearly 27% of casualties, and under trees (14%), water related (8%), and golf-related (5%) deaths associated with lightning followed. All these fatalities had 1 common denominator: being near the highest object or being the tallest object in the immediate area. This single factor accounted for 56% of all fatalities from Colorado.

Even though a swimming pool may be indoors and apparently safe, it can be a dangerous location during thunderstorms. The current can be propagated through plumbing and electric connections via the underwater lights and drains of most swimming pools. Lightning current can also enter the building, either into the electric wiring inside the building or through underground plumbing pipelines that enter the building. If lightning strikes the building or ground nearby, the current will most likely follow these pathways to the swimmers through the water. Thus, indoor-pool activities are potentially dangerous and should be avoided during thunderstorms.

Avoid taking showers and using plumbing facilities (including indoor and outdoor pools) and land-line telephones during thunderstorm

jim clemmons
June 9th, 2005, 06:19 PM
From Aquageek:


I've experienced thundersnow a time or two.

And I have experienced thunderthighs. But that was a long time ago. Goes back to swimmers and beer I reckon.

Jim

aquageek
June 9th, 2005, 07:37 PM
Originally posted by Rob Copeland
Thus, indoor-pool activities are potentially dangerous and should be avoided during thunderstorms.


Your own stats say 8% of colorado lightning death are water related. How many of those are indoor swimmers versus boaters, fishermen, lake drunkards, etc?

At some point I think I'm ok assuming the risk

Seagurl51
June 9th, 2005, 08:24 PM
Originally posted by aquageek

I've experienced thundersnow a time or two. I wonder if they close the pool for that?

I swam during a thundersnow storm this winter...it was pretty cool. Indoors, but I watched it through the windows. They didn't shut the pool down, if there had been lightening it might have been closed.

laineybug
June 10th, 2005, 01:03 AM
Our Y has a lightning detector at the outdoor pool set for 5 miles. It goes off, everyone gets out and stays out until 20 minutes have passed since the last lightning was detected. The thing is, our indoor poor is 3 or 4 miles away and when the lightning detector at the outdoor pool goes off the indoor pool closes too.

The area where I live has afternoon thunderstorms just like FL. during the Spring and Summer. It can be a pain in the bottom.

Lainey

Rob Copeland
June 10th, 2005, 08:26 AM
Originally posted by aquageek
Your own stats say 8% of colorado lightning death are water related. How many of those are indoor swimmers versus boaters, fishermen, lake drunkards, etc?

At some point I think I'm ok assuming the risk

Or drunk indoor boater/fishermen…Hey, I was only cutting and pasting from the report, it wasn’t my research. In fact, to me, some of the information seems contradictory “these fatalities had 1 common denominator: being near the highest object or being the tallest object in the immediate area. This single factor accounted for 56% of all fatalities from Colorado.” How much lower to the ground can you get than in a pool?

And if it was a question of assuming personal risk instead of the pool being held liable, I’m sure we’d see fewer pool closings. I know if given the option I’d be willing to risk it about 9 times out of 10.

jswim
June 10th, 2005, 09:00 AM
Originally posted by Rob Copeland
And if it was a question of assuming personal risk instead of the pool being held liable, I’m sure we’d see fewer pool closings. I know if given the option I’d be willing to risk it about 9 times out of 10.

Exactly.. you hit the nail on the head Rob! It's all about fear of getting sued. Understandably of course, though sometimes it'd be nice if we could just take our own risks if we so choose to.

sibleyclan
June 10th, 2005, 09:09 AM
Originally posted by jswim
Exactly.. you hit the nail on the head Rob! It's all about fear of getting sued. Understandably of course, though sometimes it'd be nice if we could just take our own risks if we so choose to.

I quite agree if we're just talking about adults. What about kids? I can't think of a one that wouldn't elect to stay in the pool if given the choice. Mine are usually quite peeved when they're made to get out.

Maybe they figure a blanket policy is better (easier :confused: ) than a differentiated one.

mattson
June 10th, 2005, 09:32 AM
Originally posted by Kevin in MD
I find it preposterous to think the electricity from a lightning strike would pass from the earth (ground) to the pipes and then back into the earth.


How about when a power line faills down into a puddle of water? By your reasoning, the electricity already has direct access to the earth and shouldn't shock anyone stepping into the water at any distance away.

One web site mentions that lightning can carry about 30,000 amps of charge. If you remember your basic electronics, that current will travel every path to a ground, even the high resistance paths.

jswim
June 10th, 2005, 09:35 AM
Originally posted by sibleyclan
I quite agree if we're just talking about adults. What about kids? I can't think of a one that wouldn't elect to stay in the pool if given the choice. Mine are usually quite peeved when they're made to get out.

Maybe they figure a blanket policy is better (easier :confused: ) than a differentiated one.

yeah, I know you're right, and I understand the reason for why the policy is the way it is. Kids for sure would stay in you're absolutely right.. heck i would have.. I Still would (depending on the gravity of the situation etc...)

Just makes it frustrating when your schedule is tight and the few times you can get to the pool in the week are shortened.

Leonard Jansen
June 10th, 2005, 09:50 AM
From a paper by an MD who apparently specializes in this sort of thing (paper link below). The implication is that there IS a good reason to get out of the pool.

"When lightning hits the ground nearby, it is 'grounded ' and I am safe. "

Totally and absolutely FALSE. Despite the fact that we call the earth a "ground," it is very difficult to pump electricity into the ground. Most "earth" is a very good insulator. When lightning hits the ground, it spreads out along the surface and first few inches of the ground in increasing circles of energy called "ground current." If it contacts a fence or a water pipe or wire entering a house it can be transmitted for quite a distance and cause injury to persons near these paths. People, being bags of electrolytes, are better transmitters of electrical current than most ground is, and many are injured by ground current effect each year as the lightning energy surges up one leg that is closer to the strike and down the one further away.

"My mother always told me to stay off the telephone (out of the bath tub, away from windows, unplug the appliances, etc.) during a thunderstorm. "

Good advice, if not always practical. Again, the ground current effect of energy transmitted into the structure along wires or pipes may find the person a better conduit to ground.(3,4) Many injuries occur every year to telephone users inside the home. One of the biggest new areas of consumer fraud has to do with claims of loss of "valuable" databases on computers damaged by lightning.(5)

Paper at:
http://www.uic.edu/labs/lightninginjury/ltnfacts.htm

-LBJ

Allen Stark
June 10th, 2005, 09:53 AM
If i remember my college physics,the charge in an enclosed conductor is always ZERO. Thats why a car is safe in a thunder storm(not because it has rubber tires.) Most indoor pools are going to have metal surrounding them in the walls making them essentially inside an enclosed conductor and therefore safe.

Kevin in MD
June 10th, 2005, 10:29 AM
Originally posted by mattson
How about when a power line faills down into a puddle of water?

It would be more accurate to say what if a power line falls on a warehouse in which I am standing that has a puddle of water inside the warehouse.

I would stand in the puddle if my heart desired yes.

A power line in a puddle is like lightning hitting the pool, the current will pass through the water to the ground and you wouldn't want to be in the way.

SwiminONandON
June 10th, 2005, 10:36 AM
The problem is if you were swimming in an indoor pool and got fried they aren't worried about you suing (your a bit too crispy) they are worried about your family suing. Only sort of kidding people sue for the dumbest things, if I was in charge of an indoor pool you'd all be booted and I'd stay and swim. :)

People just have to cover their butts.

aquageek
June 10th, 2005, 10:58 AM
Originally posted by SwiminONandON
The problem is if you were swimming in an indoor pool and got fried they aren't worried about you suing (your a bit too crispy) they are worried about your family suing.

Actually, they'd be more happy if your family sued as dead people are worth less than living disabled people.

justforfun
June 10th, 2005, 11:04 AM
Think in terms of relative risk here...I am so much more likely to be involved in a fatal car accident every single time I drive somewhere than I am to be injured while swimming in an indoor pool during a thunderstorm. Perhaps we should pass laws against all motorized vehicles for our own safety. The only reason there are policies forcing us out of indoor pools during thunderstorms is the fear of litigation (in other words, not because there is a proven substantial risk).

laineybug
June 10th, 2005, 11:35 AM
Originally posted by Allen Stark
If i remember my college physics,the charge in an enclosed conductor is always ZERO. Thats why a car is safe in a thunder storm(not because it has rubber tires.) Most indoor pools are going to have metal surrounding them in the walls making them essentially inside an enclosed conductor and therefore safe.

Allen! That could be the next trend in building pools.... making sure they are inside an enclosed conductor and therefore 'safer' to be in during a thunderstorm. Don't know how you would get water into and out of the pool but I'm sure someone could figure that out.

Okay all you engineers when you start to build these kinda pools remember I gave you the idea and want a cut of the profits.

Guvnah
June 10th, 2005, 01:06 PM
So some places shut down the indoor pools when there is a threat of lightning and other do not. Mine does not. I'd invite the rest of y'all to swim here, but it's too crowded already, and too warm, and too many people already want to swim in MY lane... So I'll keep my pool location a secret. (Or, just follow the lightning...)

Allen Stark
June 10th, 2005, 03:19 PM
If the pool is indoors and the building has a metal frame,it's SAFE!!! Not just probably safe,but completely safe.(unless someone runs a power line from the outside into the pool.)

Rob Copeland
June 10th, 2005, 04:52 PM
Originally posted by Allen Stark
If the pool is indoors and the building has a metal frame,it's SAFE!!! Not just probably safe,but completely safe.(unless someone runs a power line from the outside into the pool.)
Most indoor pools do receive electrical power from sources outside of the building, so there are power lines running from outside into the pool structure. Also, most indoor pools get water from outside sources, which are sometimes conveyed into the pool structure through pipes.

If the pool is indoors and the building has a metal frame, and water is brought to the pool in buckets, and the pumps are run off of hand cranks and the heater is coal fired, then I could see that it would be safe.

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 11th, 2005, 12:51 PM
Few indoor pools are grounded. It used to be thought that indoor pools didn't conduct eletridity from lithening. then there wsa a study done inthe late 1980's that found that almost all lightening related deaths occurred when people wewre swimming indoors during lightening storms. The study was done by the American Red Cross and the NIH. It is extremely dangerous to swim during a lightening storm. Mst gymnasiums & rec centers are natural conductors.

I think hta if the pool is indoors & the building is metal that's the most unsafe. the eletricity has no where to go but through hte building exce[pt in to the water. A structure like a Bultler buildin isn't a car. I thnk the problem with a building is that the electricty tries to find a way to flow out of the building. I think it remains like a frayed wire.

kernow
June 13th, 2005, 03:15 PM
I love storms, too. Last week, I hauled my butt outta bed at 4.45AM to go to practice, only to have a storm blow in off the sea 500 yards into my warm-up. GRRRR... :mad:

I just used the time to cross-train at the gym.

peace...

Mark in MD
June 13th, 2005, 03:44 PM
Originally posted by Allen Stark
If the pool is indoors and the building has a metal frame,it's SAFE!!! Not just probably safe,but completely safe.(unless someone runs a power line from the outside into the pool.) I work in a construction project office that is tasked with the design and construction of various building projects. I took this problem to the certified architect, electrical and civil engineers here at my office. Buildings, including metal frame ones, must have a lightning arrestor system (lightning rods) and necessary grounding to protect the building from lightening strikes. (Given the capricious nature of lightning, arrestor systems are not as simple as one would think.) Unless you can be absolutely sure the building properly incorporates such a system, it is not advisable to be in a pool within the building during such a storm. Also, lightning can travel through underground piping and wiring from other sources, such as adjacent buildings. It just makes common sense to get out, move out of the area and wait for the storm to pass. I've been in the pool where I swim when fierce storm came up one night and the pool was cleared out. Good thing. We saw a bright flash, heard a snap (electrical discharge), then sizzle and then a hugh boom. Lightning had struck very closely to the building enclosing the pool. No one was in it at the time. An ounce of prevention is a pound of cure.

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 14th, 2005, 01:58 PM
I spoke with my brother-in-law. He is an Electrical Engineer. He said that if the el;ectricity has no where to be groounded, the building isn't safe. It isn't like most building becaseu fo the structure of the building. If it is grounded, it is safe. Most pools aren't grounded. Also, the main reason to get out is becasue of possible damage to the structure of the pool from storm damage such as rain, wind, or lighting hitting trees or parts o f the buildign , and finally fire. so the buildign id safe only if nothing happenings.

Sharpsburger
July 15th, 2010, 04:56 PM
Sorry to revive the zombie thread, but I just gotta.

We've been having lots of afternoon storms -- GA weather now is like FL weather was 20 yrs ago -- and they close the indoor pool when there's thunder!

This is idiotic.

Especially considering that they have no guards and a "swim at your own risk" policy. There are plenty of times when I'm in there by myself for long periods. I could choke or have a heart attack in the water, or slip and crack my head on the deck, and I could be dead for half an hour before anyone noticed.

That would be my tough luck b/c I'm at my own risk.

But when it thunders, they gotta stop my workout.

And since I swim in the middle of a split work shift, this completely scratches my workout for the day.

I can't believe how stupid this is. As far as I know, there has never been a lightning-related injury in an indoor pool ever (http://www.aquaticsintl.com/2008/novdec/0811_rm.html).

I'm more likely to get hit by lightning when I go back to my truck, after being ejected from the pool, than I am if I were to keep swimming.

Will someone please bring sanity back to our fearful, cowering culture?!

Next time it happens, I'm tempted to just keep swimming. Can't hear them thru my earplugs, y'know.

srcoyote
July 16th, 2010, 09:15 AM
If i remember my college physics,the charge in an enclosed conductor is always ZERO. Thats why a car is safe in a thunder storm(not because it has rubber tires.) Most indoor pools are going to have metal surrounding them in the walls making them essentially inside an enclosed conductor and therefore safe.

This is why linemen who have to work on lines while perched atop them in very remote wilderness areas wear metal mesh body suits. Once they charge the suit through contact with the line, they are safe to touch anything they want.

So I'm proposing a new form of tech suit! A metal mesh body suit! You may drown, but you won't be electrocuted!:D

gigi
July 16th, 2010, 09:29 AM
Sorry to revive the zombie thread, but I just gotta.

We've been having lots of afternoon storms -- GA weather now is like FL weather was 20 yrs ago -- and they close the indoor pool when there's thunder!

This is idiotic.

Especially considering that they have no guards and a "swim at your own risk" policy. There are plenty of times when I'm in there by myself for long periods. I could choke or have a heart attack in the water, or slip and crack my head on the deck, and I could be dead for half an hour before anyone noticed.

That would be my tough luck b/c I'm at my own risk.

But when it thunders, they gotta stop my workout.

And since I swim in the middle of a split work shift, this completely scratches my workout for the day.

I can't believe how stupid this is. As far as I know, there has never been a lightning-related injury in an indoor pool ever (http://www.aquaticsintl.com/2008/novdec/0811_rm.html).

I'm more likely to get hit by lightning when I go back to my truck, after being ejected from the pool, than I am if I were to keep swimming.

Will someone please bring sanity back to our fearful, cowering culture?!

Next time it happens, I'm tempted to just keep swimming. Can't hear them thru my earplugs, y'know.

I make it my practice to avoid getting angry and upset about things like this. I know I carry on in my blog about things, but that's mostly for comic effect. In reality, I'm a pretty equanimous individual. But this particular topic gets me chew-the-doors-off-the-hinges crazy! I'm printing out your link and bringing it to the Y this week. This has got to stop! Either that or I'm going to have to spend a lot more time meditating!

swimflyfast
July 16th, 2010, 09:50 AM
Has anyone ever heard of anyone getting hit by lightning in a swimming pool, indoors or out?

in 1989 I was swimming the 200 fly and finished 120 yards of the race before the heat was pulled out of the water so that we could stand up in the wet grass..under a tent with medal posts.. Lucky for me I would have lost the race if it wasn't called as I felt like a piano was on my back. When we re-swam the race the piano fell on the other swimmers.

Follow the link at this blog to see the video. http://www.warrentonmasters.org/Blog/?p=86

Everyone was upset that they pulled us out of the pool.

charlie

bzaks1424
July 16th, 2010, 10:05 AM
Will someone please bring sanity back to our fearful, cowering culture?!

<Sigh> If only there weren't legal ramifications......

clyde hedlund
July 16th, 2010, 03:28 PM
Fantastic race Charlie. I'm going to replay it again.:applaud:

orca1946
July 18th, 2010, 07:58 PM
Yeah, in Elgin, Il at masters practice they kick us out for 30 mins, so we all go hame & eat ! ? ! :bolt:

swimflyfast
July 19th, 2010, 12:34 PM
Fantastic race Charlie. I'm going to replay it again.:applaud:

Patience.... Number one thing in the 200fly.. The first 50 is better then drugs.. then reality sets in. Now I just use the lightning as PSYCH music... AND I have never heard of anyone getting hit by lightning in a pool.. Golfing seems to get all the attention

jim thornton
July 19th, 2010, 03:47 PM
[B]


Follow the link at this blog to see the video. http://www.warrentonmasters.org/Blog/?p=86

Everyone was upset that they pulled us out of the pool.

charlie

I love how MacDonald's sponsored the meet!

Sharpsburger
July 19th, 2010, 06:17 PM
<Sigh> If only there weren't legal ramifications......

Why would there be more legal ramifications for me choosing to swim during thunder than there would be for me choosing to swim by myself with no guard? They have a clear "at your own risk" policy that I've signed and which is also posted on the deck in foot-tall block lettering. If they want to cover themselves, they can have someone come tell me it's thundering. Then it's my choice.

And since sending me back to work means I'm walking thru the parking lot, where I'm more likely to get struck by lightning, I don't see any reduction in risk for them at all.

bzaks1424
July 19th, 2010, 10:35 PM
Why would there be more legal ramifications for me choosing to swim during thunder than there would be for me choosing to swim by myself with no guard?

I was totally referring to the catalyst that would probably be necessary to start the social change out of its current state of fear mongering and living according to that fear.

swimflyfast
July 20th, 2010, 07:37 AM
News Flash: The NFL said yesterday that they are suggesting players wear knee, hip and other pads to "protect themselves from injury". Helmets and shoulder pads are mandatory. They are going to "try" this out for preseason games and summer practice... I wonder if they will have lightning rods on those helmets.. They have gotten that far in 2010... they are just figuring out that they can get hurt hitting each other..

Sharpsburger
July 23rd, 2010, 04:28 PM
I was totally referring to the catalyst that would probably be necessary to start the social change out of its current state of fear mongering and living according to that fear.

Oh, sorry. My mistake.

A quite telegraphic post there, tho.

Sharpsburger
July 23rd, 2010, 04:30 PM
News Flash: The NFL said yesterday that they are suggesting players wear knee, hip and other pads to "protect themselves from injury". Helmets and shoulder pads are mandatory. They are going to "try" this out for preseason games and summer practice... I wonder if they will have lightning rods on those helmets.. They have gotten that far in 2010... they are just figuring out that they can get hurt hitting each other..

Maybe we should try introducing full contact swimming. Or cage swimming. Get some blood in the pool and we could be the next million-dollar franchise sport!

Allen Stark
August 13th, 2010, 03:31 PM
The pool for Nationals in Puerto Rico was NOT closed for lightning(and the pool is only covered,not indoor.)