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Mark1234
June 11th, 2005, 11:10 AM
I just graduated from high school and I concentrated on distance running during high school, I did swim my senior year however. Since I don't have fast enough times to be considered for a college scholarship and I had constant injury problems when I do seriously train for running I've decided to take some time off running and concentrate on swimming.

I'm not a total beginner as I swam this past winter with the team, about 4000-5000m a practice. I was a mediocore freestyler and did fly a few times during competition. I was better at middle distances. I don't know if middle-distance swimmers swim any differently than sprinters like in running but how should I train if I was going to compete in the longer events?? What can I do to strengthen my shoulders so they're not sore, I imagine a weak rotary cuff is the culprit???

Mark1234
June 11th, 2005, 11:07 PM
Anyone?

thinkersw
June 12th, 2005, 01:02 AM
Congratulations on getting serious about training for swimming. In terms of answering your questions, I would suggest that you search the discussion board for similar threads. I know there are numerous threads on how to train for mid-distance and on how to strengthen your rotary cuff.

I would also suggest that you find a Masters team in your area to train with. Most Master coaches are very knowledgable and would be able to answer you questions as well.

Good luck with everything.

Michael Heather
June 12th, 2005, 01:52 AM
If you are complaining about muscle soreness, the only real solution is to keep with the training. It will go away soon enough.

If the pain is in the joints and you are suspecting rotator cuff problems, there is one good excercise I have heard of.

Stand in a doorway with your arms at your side, palms against your thighs. Slowly raise your arms to the side until the backs of your hands touch the door jambs on either side. Exert pressure as if you are still trying to lift your arms, holding the pressure for about five to ten seconds then release, putting your arms back at your side. Repeat 10 times. Do it at least once every day for at least a month. I think that there are variations that you can do by turning and raising your arms to the front, again pressing the back of your hand against the door jamb (you should not be more than 1 foot away from the jamb).

This is supposed to strengthen the muscle groups that surround the rotator cuff.

Don't forget to stretch (without bouncing!) before and after strenuous exercise.

ande
June 13th, 2005, 09:58 AM
When you start out, you need to take it really easy. You should feel like you're way underperforming what you're capable of. This allows your body to get used to the training. As you get in better shape, gradually increase your work load and intensity over weeks, months, seasons, and years.

My buddy Paul Carrozza (a runner) recently did an interview in Austin Fit Magazine . AFM asked him:

AFM: "What are the greatests obstacles people face when trying to begin a fitness program?"

Paul Carrozza: "Starting out easy enough. So many people either start with a fit friend that wears them out or they go from never to five days a week. If you are going to start everyday, try a mile a day for the first month, then two for the second. The bottom line is to have a strategy. Realize that your body needs small steps, a rest period, then after you've adapted you can do more."


Paul is on the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports
http://www.fitness.gov/fitnesstips.htm
He's a life long runner and owns www.runtex.com and hosts most Austin Running events.

Ande



Originally posted by Mark1234
I just graduated from high school and I concentrated on distance running during high school, I did swim my senior year however. Since I don't have fast enough times to be considered for a college scholarship and I had constant injury problems when I do seriously train for running I've decided to take some time off running and concentrate on swimming.

I'm not a total beginner as I swam this past winter with the team, about 4000-5000m a practice. I was a mediocore freestyler and did fly a few times during competition. I was better at middle distances. I don't know if middle-distance swimmers swim any differently than sprinters like in running but how should I train if I was going to compete in the longer events?? What can I do to strengthen my shoulders so they're not sore, I imagine a weak rotary cuff is the culprit???