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craiglll@yahoo.com
June 27th, 2005, 03:50 PM
I've been watching a lot of videos recently. It seems that the only people who ever look to the bottom of the pool and don't raise their head when they are swimming free are a few swimmers from the US. Now here in the states, it is god's word that you must look to the bottom of the pool & role into the breath. In a video of Shoeman, he roles so little that frequently his hands & hips hit. Thorpe looks forward & Hackett moves his head very much when he breahtes.

Why do we in the US think that it is so important to role from our hips & breath with out lifting our heads?

tjburk
June 27th, 2005, 03:55 PM
Lifting your head makes your hips drop...creating more drag. Better to stay streamlined the whole time.

Jeff Commings
June 27th, 2005, 06:17 PM
If you have good buoyancy, then it's OK for you to raise your head on freestyle. The rest of us need to do everything we can to keep from sinking.

But don't lift your head too much. It creates drag.

I think Thorpe and Hackett have pretty good head positions. It's right on the neutral line. Not too far up, not too far down.

Peter Cruise
June 27th, 2005, 08:35 PM
Also, don't forget that Thorpe & Hackett have stunningly powerful kicks (I think Thorpe could tow a waterskier), which also lets them be a little more cavalier about head position than us mere mortals.

Tom Ellison
June 28th, 2005, 09:08 AM
It also (IMHO) is somewhat of a leave over from the GREAT Janet Evans FLAT SWIMMING style.....She swam FLAT...and many years later most of her distance records still stand. I believe she was one of the greatest swimmers ever.....

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 28th, 2005, 10:23 AM
Originally posted by Jeff Commings
If you have good buoyancy, then it's OK for you to raise your head on freestyle. The rest of us need to do everything we can to keep from sinking.

But don't lift your head too much. It creates drag.

I think Thorpe and Hackett have pretty good head positions. It's right on the neutral line. Not too far up, not too far down.

Look at Hackett, he barely kicks. On one video I've been watching, he only kicks five times through 10 strokes.

I can't find one European swimmer,except maybe Inge a long time ago when she trained in the US a lot, who actually rolls their hips. I looked at manyof the video clips on ee. swimming & WA swimming.

It does seeem that they all do fqs though which seems to be made easier by their not rolling.

craiglll@yahoo.com
June 30th, 2005, 05:46 PM
I have been workong really hard on looking down & rotating through my hips. Now I have a moderate muscle strain in my lower neck. I even tried counting my hip rotation instead of hand entry like was mentioned in TI's electronic newletter.

Any suggestions.

Bob McAdams
July 1st, 2005, 01:18 PM
Originally posted by craiglll@yahoo.com
I have been workong really hard on looking down & rotating through my hips. Now I have a moderate muscle strain in my lower neck. I even tried counting my hip rotation instead of hand entry like was mentioned in TI's electronic newletter.

Any suggestions.

Stop working so hard! Lifting your head is something you do, not something you don't, so you shouldn't need to work really hard at not doing it. Try relaxing your neck and see what happens.

Michael Heather
July 4th, 2005, 11:34 PM
You only need to "lift" your head if you can't see by looking forward through the water. Remember, TI teaches a very generic way to do things, simplified so that anyone can understand. Everyone has their own style.

Spend more time enjoying the time in the water rather than ruining the experience for yourself by comparing Olympic Champions to your own swimming style. They don't worry how you swim.

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 5th, 2005, 10:48 AM
By "working hard," I meant that I am concentratign on that poimt while I'm swimming. Like drills