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DanSad
July 14th, 2005, 03:18 PM
How do you correctly "listen to your body"? If you swim on a regular basis you seem to build up a certain level of fatigue. So if on a particular day you feel more tired than usual and/or you're having trouble maintaining the paces you can typically maintain how do you know whether you should push through it or if your body needs rest? I've read in swimming books that you can get to a point of "failing adaptation" but I don't think I'm at that point because I swim appx 5 days a week and 3500-4500 yards each day.

TheGoodSmith
July 14th, 2005, 03:48 PM
Intensity is more important that just pounding yardage when evaluating your speed and performance level. Better to do quality yardage than just long yardage.

If you feel you are getting broken down and are swimming regularly, try to keep the grind going for a week or so before you back off to recover. Obviously you don't want to keep the break down going indefinitely or you won't recover and get stronger. The trick is to bury yourself enough to get improvement and then recover and repeat the process. Note, I am not talking about a full rest like a taper for a big meet. Just back off enough to feel human again and then start the process over.

Old people get tired faster and easier and take more time to recover than kids and people in the 20 and early 30s.

I guess the answer to your question is.... it depends. It depends on what you are used to, what events you are training for and how well your recover compared to other people, are you healthy and not sick, whether you are supplementing your water workouts with weights, running, biking etc..... there's a lot of variables to consider


John Smith

valhallan
July 14th, 2005, 04:39 PM
I agree with John. The amount of training that you'll be able to endure has many variables. There's going to be a gradual adjustment period when you can slowly add more yardage and intensity. Getting good rest is just as important as the workout itself.

I have heard that if your resting pulse is higher than normal,...your body is fatigued. The low energy days might be better spent on technique improvement rather than trying to push through the pain. Remember that this isn't a short term endeavor. Ideally you want to be injury free and in the water year after year. Enjoy.

By the way five times a week at 4,000 yards on average is pretty good. Most masters programs are Mon. Wed. Fri. with maybe a Saturday workout.

battle
July 14th, 2005, 09:38 PM
I really like John's answer above. Two things I have also noticed - if I get too broken down it takes a long time to warm up and feel good in the water, I also start getting asthma problems when I am very tired. These might not pertain to you but you might find your own ques that tell you that your body has had enough. Ultimately you want to back off before you get sick or hurt.

waves101
July 15th, 2005, 08:44 AM
How to listen correctly remains to be debated. Today is my rest day. Normally I swim about 4x/week but have been in the water for 11 days straight. I had a competitive swim on Tuesday and another coming this Tuesday. Wednesday I felt terrible (sore muscles, no energy, etc) but my interval times were still on. I swam thru this stage to help my body recover. Yesterday I could feel some energy returning but still had sore shoulders. Today I will rest so I can focus on some good powerful workouts over the weekend in preping for the Tuesday swim. Monday will be a light workout so hopefully Tuesday will be peak performance (within the week). Then I'll repeat the whole process. If I didn't have the Tuesday competitions my process may differ slightly but I always try to take the rest when, I believe, it will make the greatest difference. And that always depends on whats forthcoming.

Alex
July 15th, 2005, 10:19 AM
I agree with all the answers above, but one other element could be your own mind, may be it is not just your body who is asking for rest but your mind also, perhaps you also need distraction in another way, the routine also makes you to feel tired.

When I feel too tired for my swimming practices, I switch for another activity for a couple days, bicycling or lifting weight, somethimes I do something with my kids instead going to swim.

Playing tennis with a friend or with my wife also helps me to relax... but I try to play against her if we are playing doubles because if not instead of relaxing it is the other way around.:D :D

TheGoodSmith
July 15th, 2005, 10:50 AM
I think ultimately, your question is one of which separates average coaches from great coaches. The ability to recognize fatigue in swimmers on an individual basis is key to improvement. Most coaches, unfortunately, don't run their programs so as to allow individual swimmers to recover on their own mid season. They don't customize their training programs enough on an individual basis. They tend to address the entire team similarly. Even within a particular stroke or distance lane, swimmers get more or less tired on their own depending on their abilities, work ethic, stroke or event, health etc....

Your question zeros in on what coaches are supposed to excel at.... i.e. getting the most out of their swimmers. Mind you, great swimmers are also great at recognizing what their own bodies need in terms of more or less training, and they communicate well with their coaches on where they think they are at in the cycle. Running multiple workouts for sprinters, middle distance and distance swimmers is not always enough. Coaches must recognize fatigue mid season and adjust on an individual basis at times. This individual treatment carries through the season to taper. The great coaches can run a half a dozen or more taper programs at once depending on the set of swimmers he's trained and their different needs.


John Smith

Conniekat8
July 15th, 2005, 03:21 PM
Originally posted by DanSad
How do you correctly "listen to your body"? If you swim on a regular basis you seem to build up a certain level of fatigue. So if on a particular day you feel more tired than usual and/or you're having trouble maintaining the paces you can typically maintain how do you know whether you should push through it or if your body needs rest? I've read in swimming books that you can get to a point of "failing adaptation" but I don't think I'm at that point because I swim appx 5 days a week and 3500-4500 yards each day.

In addition to The Good Smith's comments on the importance of having a good coach (which I'm lucky to have) few more thoughts...

In my particualr case, I can tell by the intensity of the pain and tiredness, and some of the weak spots I'm aware of from experience...
Sometimes I can be tired one day, and push through it just fine, and even get fired up mid workout, other days I know that if I push through *this* workout, I'll pay for it ny hurting too much, or getting myself close to the injury.
Also depends on the workout that I'm about to do... in my poersonal case, when I'm tired, I'm still up for a medium intensity distance workout, but a set of sprints will do me in.

Also, I never judge how I feel before the workout, I get in, warm up, and see how it goes. If it's too much, I'll cut down on the length or the intensity of the sets, or even get out mid workout if I need to.

It takes some trial and error to get there.

If ytou don't tend to remember details of how you feel during and after a workout, keep a diary.

Personally, I'm taking the advantage of that "well known" female trait of having an elephant memory when it comes to remembering how something made you feel... ;)
So I tend to just remember the details.