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nkace
July 15th, 2005, 03:01 PM
So I can just imagine all the dryness everyone suffers from swimming in chlorine, bromine, etc.
What is the best way to prevent damaged hair & over-dry skin?
Moisturize, moisturize & moisturize is all I seem to do as of late.
Are there methods that really work? Give a shout, i would love to know. :confused:

hmlee
July 15th, 2005, 03:56 PM
Forgive me for sounding like an ad here...but to keep my hair from getting too dryed out when I wash it I also condition with dove intense moisture...I really like it and my hair isn't dry at all.

tuck
July 15th, 2005, 04:05 PM
I wet my hair in the shower and wear a cap. Your hair soaks up the pool water, if it's full of clean water before hand it won't soak up as many chemicals. This also keeps moisterizers and conditioners out of the pool.

laineybug
July 15th, 2005, 04:30 PM
The other day, my granddaughter, who swims age group, went to get a hair cut. The stylist told her to mix a teaspoon of baking soda with her shampoo. Wash her hair as usual then do a deep conditioning, like the Aussie 3 minute conditioner or the VO5 conditioner. She tried it. I have never seen her hair so soft, conditioned, shiney and blonde. It looked really good.

nkace
July 15th, 2005, 04:38 PM
Originally posted by tuck
I wet my hair in the shower and wear a cap. Your hair soaks up the pool water, if it's full of clean water before hand it won't soak up as many chemicals. This also keeps moisterizers and conditioners out of the pool.

Yes this is 1 of the tricks I do use. So at least I am doing something right.

waves101
July 15th, 2005, 05:01 PM
For the skin, I use Curel. It's one of the few lotions that does not have mineral oil which is actually a drying agent. I use it on my body and face both. It doesnt cause any irritation or greasiness. The chlorine doesn't seem to bother my hair much but that could be because I don't have much hair! Sorry, I couldnt help on this one.

kernow
July 15th, 2005, 06:09 PM
Olive oil is a great moisturiser (I use the 'Kiss My Face' brand, which has olive oil in it; my DH uses straight olive oil)...

Baking soda with shampoo? What a great idea- I'll try it tomorrow...

laineybug
July 15th, 2005, 06:48 PM
evidently, the baking soda strips chlorine and other chemical deposits out of your hair. I think she let it sit on her hair for a little bit. Remember you have to use one of the deep conditioners afterwards.

In reference to the wet your hair before you get in the pool...

osmosis--Diffusion of fluid through a semipermeable membrane from a solution with a low solute concentration to a solution with a higher solute concentration until there is an equal concentration of fluid on both sides of the membrane.

It would seem to me that human hair would act like a semipermeable membrane and that over the course of a swim chlorine would move across the membrane from the high concentration (pool) to the low concentration (shower water in your hair) until the chlorine was equal on both sides of the membrane.

POP QUIZ: Why doesn't this principle hold for human hair? Or does it, and the wet your hair before you get in the pool just an urban legen?

Lainey

jim clemmons
July 15th, 2005, 06:59 PM
POP QUIZ: Why doesn't this principle hold for human hair?

Because your hair is actually dead if I recall correctly.

Jim

laineybug
July 15th, 2005, 08:24 PM
I don't think that matters.

Lainey

nkace
July 18th, 2005, 02:30 PM
Originally posted by laineybug
evidently, the baking soda strips chlorine and other chemical deposits out of your hair. I think she let it sit on her hair for a little bit. Remember you have to use one of the deep conditioners afterwards.

In reference to the wet your hair before you get in the pool...

osmosis--Diffusion of fluid through a semipermeable membrane from a solution with a low solute concentration to a solution with a higher solute concentration until there is an equal concentration of fluid on both sides of the membrane.

It would seem to me that human hair would act like a semipermeable membrane and that over the course of a swim chlorine would move across the membrane from the high concentration (pool) to the low concentration (shower water in your hair) until the chlorine was equal on both sides of the membrane.

POP QUIZ: Why doesn't this principle hold for human hair? Or does it, and the wet your hair before you get in the pool just an urban legen?

Lainey


So then what is the answer?

Seagurl51
July 18th, 2005, 02:49 PM
I have been seeing commercials for the new Olay in-shower body lotion and I finally broke down and bought some (extra dry skin formula). It is amazing!! I use it in addition to a deep moisturizing body wash and I'm noticing a difference in my skin after about only a week.

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 19th, 2005, 11:49 AM
I've found that over the counter products almost always work better than swimming specific products do.

Jeff Commings
July 19th, 2005, 01:58 PM
Does anyone use Ultra Swim? I did for a while, but it's more expensive.

Does it work better than ordinary shampoos?

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 19th, 2005, 05:47 PM
Best I've found is Pert 2 then Infusium conditioner for extremely damaged hair then Infusium leave in coditioner. You don't need to use much. I've found that one bottle of pert will last almost one month. The Infusium condictioer for about 1 1/2 month and the big bottle of leavbve in over 2 months. Much cheaper & easier on your hair than any "swimming" specific product I've ever used. My oldest sister use to own beauty saloons around the Houston area. She is the one who has always recommended Infusium products.

iswim41
August 12th, 2005, 04:02 AM
I read a book this winter, The Curly Girl, about embracing curly hair. What was interesting is, the author says, do not use shampoo, ever, as curly hair is dry and shampoo dries hair out (for curly hair, dryness means frizz). Anyway, I stopped using shampoo. I still 'wash' my hair, I rinse with water and use conditioner and then rinse most, but not all of the conditioner out. Once a week, I wash with the conditioner. Meaning I get in and really scrub the scalp, rinse and condition again. It really works. I have frizz this summer with the humidity, but my hair is not dried out.

This 'no shampoo' probably works with straight hair, too, as far as not drying it out with shampoo, but you may want to wash out all the conditioner.

Meli
August 14th, 2005, 12:36 AM
I've finally given in and started using the Aussie 3 minute miracle deep conditioning treatment every time I swim. I have long curly hair and live in a dry climate, so I need all the help I can get! I also keep a bottle of the Infusium leave-in conditioner stuff in my swim bag just in case I need a little extra something.

As for my skin.... moisturize, moisturize, moisturize! I probably put moisturizer on my face three times a day. (Again, dry climate.) Once in the morning, once immediately after getting out of my post-swim shower (which is when I moisturize the rest of me), and then again at night. I also use Clinique's 7-day exfoliating facial scrub in the shower after my swim. It really helps to keep any dry patches on my face to a minimum. I really can tell the difference when I don't use it. It's gentle enough to use every day and doesn't have the big chunks of stuff in it like the St. Ives apricot scrubs do.

thisgirl13
August 14th, 2005, 09:19 AM
Now see, that all works great in places like Colorado. Ohio's a totally different animal.

The weather here is confused, I think. Most times it's always humid, and the temperature this summer has gone from highs in the mid-60's to 115 on a record weekend we had not too long ago. Rain tends to just appear out of nowhere, on a completely unpredictable pattern, and winters are cold as sin.

So throw a little chlorine in there, and everything's a guessing game. I think I've used every conditioner, hair trick, lotion, and face wash out there (well, maybe not EVERY, but you get my point) The results of my social experiment?:

Regular shampoos work better than those swim-removers, especially for those of you with dry, curly hair.

Aussie's deep conditioners are great, especially if you use that baking soda trick.

Baking soda is not a good trick to use on curly hair.

Most face washes for dry skin are pretty good. However, I've found that some tend to react to the chlorine in my pores, and make my skin drier than it was before - i.e. St. Ives. Aveeno, Dove, and surprise surprise, Noxema, work really well.

Most lotions also work great - Olay in-shower is a miracle, I swear it. It requires a little more shower time, for those in a hurry, but it's worth it. Nivea is another god-send, but Curel works decently too. Aveeno is fantastic too.

As far as face lotions, that's an open work - I usually switch mine to match the seasons here. Right now, it's pure and simple Aloe Vera. WIntertime, it's usually Neutrogena or Dove - Aveeno when I can afford it (hey, poor college student here).

Now, of course, these are all based on how well they worked for me, so I'm not making any promises. But I figured I've tried them all, so I might as well share how well they work.

clyde hedlund
August 14th, 2005, 03:10 PM
When swimming in the open ocean for an hour or more, I just spread cheap petroleum jelly or tanning oil all over the body. It also helps in reducing the severity of acid stings from blue bottles. After an hour, what's left on the skin comes off easy with soap and water. The skin was protected from the sea water and looks good afterwards. clyde

PeirsolFan
August 14th, 2005, 05:15 PM
Originally posted by laineybug
evidently, the baking soda strips chlorine and other chemical deposits out of your hair. I think she let it sit on her hair for a little bit. Remember you have to use one of the deep conditioners afterwards.

In reference to the wet your hair before you get in the pool...

osmosis--Diffusion of fluid through a semipermeable membrane from a solution with a low solute concentration to a solution with a higher solute concentration until there is an equal concentration of fluid on both sides of the membrane.

It would seem to me that human hair would act like a semipermeable membrane and that over the course of a swim chlorine would move across the membrane from the high concentration (pool) to the low concentration (shower water in your hair) until the chlorine was equal on both sides of the membrane.

POP QUIZ: Why doesn't this principle hold for human hair? Or does it, and the wet your hair before you get in the pool just an urban legen?

Lainey

Interesting. What other chemicals are being used with chlorine in the pool, if any? Is diffusion a factor? What about osmotic potential? I'm rusty at this. Chlorine chemically bonds with skin and hair proteins and is easily absorbed.

Yes, cells consist of semi-permeable membranes because of the phospholipid bi-layers which have positively and negatively charged heads which can neutralized with the help of sodium ions (salt) thus making the membranes fully permeable.

Never heard of wetting hair before getting in the pool but it would defy the norms of reason since chlorine is present in all of our water sources.

laineybug
August 14th, 2005, 07:00 PM
evidently the proponents of wet your hair before you get into the pool believe that you fill the hair shaft with water containing less chlorine than pool water, and therefore you hair won't absorb the more highly chlorinated water.

No one either pro or con has been able to provide me with good hard data (LOL, who do I sound like now) to prove that this is effective or ineffective.

Michael Heather
August 14th, 2005, 08:31 PM
Hair is just a byproduct of the body's processing. The answer is to shave yer noggin. Let it shine! Saves a lot of cabbage on hair care products, too.

PeirsolFan
August 15th, 2005, 02:55 AM
I appreciate the exchange of biological theories! :P

If it's more water than chlorine that would be hyperosmotic. You see? You see why I never passed that darn class?

YvonneS
December 15th, 2006, 11:35 AM
Hi,
I am trying to squeeze in a swim during my hour lunch break.
I am female, wear eye makeup and have medium length, thick brown hair, which I color about once per month.

I need to know how to prioritize, and speed-up the time it takes me after I get out of the pool. I do the "wet your hair thing" before I put on my swimming cap, to help with the damage to my hair.

What I need to know, is how really important is it to wash your hair after you swim? Can I just rinse it with water from the shower? Or do I have to both 1) wash it using shampoo (that I will soon add Baking Soda to) and 2) condition it?

Will my hair suffer worse damage if I don't shampoo it immediately after getting out of the pool?

I don't have time to put lotion on immediately after my lunchtime shower, but maybe I should use a moisturizing soap, like Dove.

BTW: I found these great Speedo goggles that helps keep my eye makeup on during my swim.

Any comments, tips, etc. will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!
.ys :frustrated:

tuck
December 15th, 2006, 01:07 PM
I do the lunchtime thing too.

I forgot about the cap and wet hair thing I gave that up over the summer cause it got too hot. Some one even told me about putting conditioner on your wet hair in the cap, but I would think that would get in the pool.

I really can't not wash my hair at least coming out of the pool. I ususually end up taking another shower at home in the evening because I still stink, I condition then. I also just put lotion on places that show like my face and hands.

Everybody knows I swim at lunch, They're all jealouse cause I get half naked.

tuck

YvonneS
December 15th, 2006, 01:23 PM
Hi tuck,
I've tried the hair conditioner before you put your swim cap on thing, but it makes the cap slide off. I guess if you have a cloth cap then it probably will stay on, but I don't know if the cloth cap is protecting your hair though, but it also is cooler than a silicone based or lycra cap, as you can feel the water run through your hair.

I guess I will do a quick, "run some shampoo through my hair", and skip the massage my scalp, while I'm shampooing routing. I was thinking about getting one of those 2-in-1 shampoo / conditioners, then do an intensive conditioner once a week.

One time my hair got really messed up from swimming, and I used to put some thick (cheap, kinda greasy) hair conditioner on before I went to bed, and put some old cotton underwear on my head, so it wouldn't ruin my pillow cases. When I woke up in the morning I would get in the shower and do a quick shampoo, then rinse to get most of the excess, unabsorbed greasy stuff out of my hair. I did this for about 2 months and eventually my hair was soft again. I hope not to let it get this bad though.

Adios!
/ys:banana:

islandsox
December 15th, 2006, 01:44 PM
I am now an open water swimmer only because I live on an island. So moisturizing is not necessary because the humidity is so high.

But when I was in the States and swimming in chlorine, I always put a small amount of conditioner on my hair before I swam and it did not come off in the pool that I know of. And, my cap always stayed on. Maybe it is the amount of conditioner people are using; use less?

The Olay shower gel/soap is a wonder, as is Curel. But my favorite for moisturizing without feeling slightly greasy is Cetaphil---and it's dermatologist recommended.

Slightly off of this thread: there is a product called Avon Skin So Soft and it, too, is a great moisturizer, but is a little oily for awhile. We use it down here instead of bug spray which contains so much deet.

Donna

nkfrench
December 15th, 2006, 04:22 PM
Wear your chlorine-damaged straw-textured, white-bleached broken hair and that scaly itchy skin with pride -- you earned it! :) Then you can also not worry about getting your hair all dried and fixed pretty because it will look just as good drippy wet.

Some of the kids at our pool smear gobs of conditioner in their hair before putting on their swim cap and it is kind of disgusting when you are swimming through that flavored water from somebody else.

I hear that drinking lots of water helps keep your skin moisturized. The stuff out of the tap is cheap and plentiful. Can't vouch, I am a diet coke/coffee girl.

lapswimmr
December 15th, 2006, 07:44 PM
In winter my skin gets dry. Taking a shower first hydrates my skin. I like the St. Ives lotions also. My hair care routine is very simple. I wear a home made "swim band " made from a Speedo silicon cap. Then I wear a bubble strap cap over it. I put the outer cap on so its right even in the front with the inner silicon cap so no red marks on the forehead. I like the Barracuda Standard goggles. Foamy large covers all the eye area and no raccon eyes.
My hair stays anywhere from almost completely dry 99% to very dry 95% depending on exactly how I get the caps on day to day but its the dryest way I have found after lots of experimenting. The swim band can also be worn outside of a regular cap or bubble cap.. See the page

http://www.geocities.com/lapswimr/swimband.html

for details and links to the swim cap guide for more info on swim hair care.

notsofast
December 16th, 2006, 12:44 PM
I never shampoo after swimming. I figure soaking my hair for an hour in a mild bleach solution means its clean. I found that if I shampoo after swimming, my hair ended up stiff and sticking out.
However, I use a lot of conditioner and I think the key is to let it sit on your hair for a couple minutes, so that it has a chance to work. So the shower routine is pretty complicated. To get done quickly, I have to be efficient.
- soak hair
- apply conditioner
- rinse suit
- clean goggles
- rinse out conditioner
- apply more conditioner
- wash the rest of my body
- rinse out conditioner
This seems to work well for me. The conditioner is the cheapest stuff I can find and formulated for dry hair.