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hmlee
July 18th, 2005, 01:10 PM
This is going to sound silly, but I can't remember how to do a vertical kick drill...uh...any help?

Seagurl51
July 18th, 2005, 01:22 PM
Get into deep water so you can't touch the bottom and kick. It's like treading water with a flutter kick. To make it harder, hold your hands out of water....the higher you go, the harder it gets.

ande
July 18th, 2005, 02:07 PM
i'm not a fan of vertical kicking
I prefer kicking a particular distance for time or on an interval

ande


Originally posted by hmlee
This is going to sound silly, but I can't remember how to do a vertical kick drill...uh...any help?

scyfreestyler
July 18th, 2005, 02:11 PM
I have never done any vertical kicking but I have been doing a lot of kicking on my back. Not for time or even on intervals, just as much as I can do. Until my legs are on fire!! I want to make certain that I can kick like mad for all of my races in September.

nkace
July 18th, 2005, 02:32 PM
Um, what is the purpose of this exactly? :confused:

Seagurl51
July 18th, 2005, 02:43 PM
Originally posted by nkace
Um, what is the purpose of this exactly? :confused:

That's a good question....never quite figured out why you wouldn't just do a kick set. Does it work a different set of muslces when you kick vertically compared to horizontal?

Rob Copeland
July 18th, 2005, 04:01 PM
Originally posted by nkace
Um, what is the purpose of this exactly? :confused:
1) Variety, swimmers and coaches get bored with just kicking up and down the pool
2) Less stress on lower back than kicking with a board
3) Can be worked much harder than regular kicking, try vertical kicking for 60 seconds while holding a tight streamline
4) Helps to get you in shape for water polo, work on that egg-beater
5) Takes up much less space in the pool
6) Looks almost as silly as water aerobics

hmlee
July 18th, 2005, 04:03 PM
I'm mainly interested because I've seen it show up in sets before to break things up (much like the on the gutter/edge push ups) and I couldn't really remember how to do it, heh.

Matthias
July 18th, 2005, 04:20 PM
Originally posted by nkace
Um, what is the purpose of this exactly? :confused:

I use it as a way to see how effectiv my kick is. If you have a poor kick, you will waste too much energy and swallow water. "Survival instincts will quickly figure out the most effective way to help you stay at the surface" (E.Hines)

brgds

Matthias

Jeff Commings
July 18th, 2005, 06:02 PM
Rob's reason No. 1 is the main purpose of doing it. But for the swimmers, it's a great way to work the abs. Your ab muscles keep you vertical, especially if you're a sinker like me.

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 19th, 2005, 11:46 AM
Jeff has it right. Not only does it work your abs but it will keep your ankles soft and flexible so you don't need ot do ankle & feet flexing at nioght while you're watching tv.

Karen Duggan
July 19th, 2005, 12:14 PM
I love to do vertical kicking. We used to wear shoes and hold weights... It helped me develop a strong kick, I think. :)
It definitely broke up the workout!

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 19th, 2005, 05:48 PM
Originally posted by Karen Duggan
I love to do vertical kicking. We used to wear shoes and hold weights... It helped me develop a strong kick, I think. :)
It definitely broke up the workout!

Holds weights! That sounds like a very mean coach to me. did anyone ever go under?

Michael Heather
July 20th, 2005, 09:49 AM
Even though I am usually averse to drills, this one is a good thing to try on a regular basis. Vertical kicking keeps the workout group honest if done correctly, i.e., with hands out of water, and not near a convenient wall or bottom. It can also be a socially interactive time, if the coach has announcements to make or the swimmers just want to complain to one another (what masters do best/ most).

With the new emphasis on kicking up AND down, it will give a lot of work for the time taken in practice. A very efficient and productive set. After only 60 seconds, you feel it.

lefty
July 20th, 2005, 10:06 AM
I do vertical kicking on an interval: 1 minute on, 15 seconds off 10 times through. My goal for the up coming season is 5 hours of vertical kicking (total for the season). We'll see.

IN addition to the ab work, I have always thought it was the best way to work on ankle flexibility. Try staying afloat with out your feet pointed. Wasn't that you specialty though, Jeff?

nkace
July 20th, 2005, 12:13 PM
So you kick the same way you normally do? or is a there a certain way of kicking you should be doing?
Arms & hands out of the water? Really?

lefty
July 20th, 2005, 12:16 PM
Originally posted by nkace
So you kick the same way you normally do? or is a there a certain way of kicking you should be doing?
Arms & hands out of the water? Really?

I am not sure who you are directing this to, and I do not know what you mean by "Really," but I don't mind answering:

Kick with your arms out of the water. The higher your hands, the more difficult the excercise. I have a 90 degree bend at the elbows and keep my upper arms at water level. Sometimes I bring my arms straight out (a strea line position) but only do that in 20 second spurts.

thisgirl13
July 21st, 2005, 02:10 AM
When I swam high school, I had a coach who absolutely loved vertical kicking drills. He would have the whole team go to the deep end, age groupers included, and we would spend a whole practice down there. We devoted one practice a week to vertical kicking, and most of us hated it. *Some of us* still hate it to this day.

The workout would go as follows: 5 minutes regular treading water flutter kick; 3 minutes with arms out of the water to your elbow; 30 seconds with arms in streamline position; 30 seconds with arms in streamline position dolphin kick. 1 minute rest on wall, repeat set.

At the end of practice, when we all were too exhausted to move, he would have us high schoolers strap ankle weights on, and do streamline with flutter kick until only one person "survived" - i.e. their chins didn't sink below the water. That person would then get to skip the kick set at the next morning's practice.

I will admit, however, that those not-so-blissful times in high school, my kicking was much improved, and so was my core strength - God how I miss those abs! :p

nkace
July 21st, 2005, 12:05 PM
Originally posted by lefty
I am not sure who you are directing this to, and I do not know what you mean by "Really," but I don't mind answering:

Kick with your arms out of the water. The higher your hands, the more difficult the excercise. I have a 90 degree bend at the elbows and keep my upper arms at water level. Sometimes I bring my arms straight out (a strea line position) but only do that in 20 second spurts.

I am trying to picture if your arms are above your head or if they are on the surface of the water.

Frank Thompson
July 21st, 2005, 01:23 PM
I agree with what everyone is saying and will add that as a kicking drill it's a great conditioner. When I put fins on, either zoomers, split fins, or just standard fins you really feel it both in your heart rate and your VO2. In fact when I do these, I feel the same sensations as when doing VO2 Max swims. The body is really working hard and you always have to strive for the perfect extention with your arms while the legs work as hard as they can.