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some_girl
July 28th, 2005, 09:36 PM
How embarrassed do you feel for getting out before the workout is over if you don't feel well? This evening, I was at practice for my new team and I was swimming so poorly that I got bumped down a lane. Then, I began to feel even worse, so finally I just got out at one hour and went home. Now that I feel a bit better, I'm totally mortified for not finishing. Extenuating circumstance: I'm new to this team and am very slow compared to them--normally I swim in lane 2. So I'm always a little embarassed jsut for being slow.

Donna
July 28th, 2005, 10:05 PM
Some days you just have to listen to your body and do what you think is best for you. Don't worry about it. You have to get used to a new team and figure out where you fit in with this group. Once you get more used to this group you will feel more comfortable.

You'll also find that you'll make some good friends along the way so just go and enjoy the challenge.

Getting out early once in a while is something everyone does and you learn to just move on. Some days the motivation or the body just need some time off.

Enjoy

Sabretooth Tiger
July 28th, 2005, 10:13 PM
Not at all . . . this is masters . . . we're adults . . . we get in when we can and get out when we have to or want to. No one will think poorly of you . . . and if they do, it's their problem, not yours.

At least that's how it works on my team.

carl

waves101
July 29th, 2005, 08:32 AM
If this was age group swimming, my coach would have said puke in the gutters and keep swimming. Since this is masters, you did fine. If you don't feel good/right, then certainly do what you need to do. When you get to feeling better just go back and work your way up a lane or two. It takes time but you'll get there!

aquageek
July 29th, 2005, 08:47 AM
With all that adults have going on in their lives, I've never seen anyone say a word to someone who gets out early. I think that would be quite rude.

Now, when someone shows up late, they get their fair share of ribbing. Since we swim at 6 am, if someone shows up at 6:10 or 6:15 they will customarily get a "good evening" from the rest of us.

valhallan
July 29th, 2005, 09:49 AM
During the school year many of the teachers in our club have to hop out early to get ready for morning classes. I'm right there with them, as my wife is a teacher and I've got to rush home and help get the kids ready for school.

Don't ever be ashamed of having to get out. This isn't age group swimming, and you're not vying for a college scholarship. :)

Have fun and sooner than later your body will adapt to the new stresses of tougher intervals. Accept the lane change as a challenge to become a better swimmer without hurting yourself in the process.

Sonic Swimmer78
July 29th, 2005, 10:39 AM
I read everyone's posts here and I agree with everyone who has replied. You shouldn't feel embarrassed for getting out early. You were exhausted and needed some rest. I can tell you that I've done the same. Once when I got a really nasty stomach flu back in February, which wasn't pretty.

Not to bludgeon a dead horse here, but we're in Masters Swimming, we're all adults with open minds, so if you have to leave early because of fatigue or some other circumstance (preparing dinner for the kids or getting to your evening shift at work on time) we will all understand.

Those days of being chewed out by your High School Swim Coach are over.

With all that being said, Masters isn't about who can do the entire workout the quickest, it's not about who can swim the fastest either, it's about having one hell of a good swim with others who are just as fond of swimming as you are, so have fun.

geochuck
July 29th, 2005, 11:00 AM
Never get embarrassed about getting out get embarrassed if you don't even go in... The pool in town closes for the nmonth of August and the closest pool is 45 min away. I think our town should be embarrassed about closing for a month.

ande
July 29th, 2005, 11:21 AM
In masters
it's NOT AT ALL embarassing to get out early
from any practice
at any time
for any reason.

same goes with arriving late.

Though it probably would be embarrassing if you had gastric issues, visibly tainted a lane and caused the entire pool to evacuate and get scrubbed like the pool scene in "Caddy Shack"

it's great that you showed up and did something
we all live lives beyond swimming
people get out early all the time for a whole host of reasons from
business meetings, not feeling well, not wanting to do a set, tapering and not needing to do a set.

when you need to leave,
walk up to the coach and say I need to leave, thank you for the practice, and walk out

OK USMS Boarders:
What's the flimsiest reason you ever got out of practice early for?

Ande


Originally posted by some_girl
How embarrassed do you feel for getting out before the workout is over if you don't feel well? This evening, I was at practice for my new team and I was swimming so poorly that I got bumped down a lane. Then, I began to feel even worse, so finally I just got out at one hour and went home. Now that I feel a bit better, I'm totally mortified for not finishing. Extenuating circumstance: I'm new to this team and am very slow compared to them--normally I swim in lane 2. So I'm always a little embarassed jsut for being slow.

craiglll@yahoo.com
July 29th, 2005, 11:21 AM
I almost always have to leave the pool once during a practice. I have had my colon removed. If I'm doing IM work, no way can I stay through the entire set or I have to leave as soon as the set is finished. Usually, though I get back as soon as possible.

Sonic Swimmer78
July 29th, 2005, 01:26 PM
Ande, to answer your question, I think my flimsiest reason was back in February when I started feeling nausious and puked out stomach acid in the shower room.

I was sick with the stomach flu that whole day.

Guvnah
July 29th, 2005, 01:29 PM
When I get out early, the regulars in the pool know that there is something wrong with me and I get sympathy, not derision.

When I see another regular get out early (if they're not a regular, I don't know what early is for them) I know something is wrong and I hold him/her in high esteem for getting into the pool in the first place on an off-day.

geochuck
July 29th, 2005, 01:36 PM
I raced in Mexico, sick, sick, sick from all over, before and after however able to swim and not do it in the pool. It was the food, also sun stroke, sunburnt blood coming from my shoulders. I still got the silver medal.

ande
July 29th, 2005, 01:50 PM
that's not a flimsy reason
that's legit in my book

flimsy would be
didn't like a set
just felt like leaving for no particular reason

ande


Originally posted by Sonic Swimmer78
Ande, to answer your question, I think my flimsiest reason was back in February when I started feeling nausious and puked out stomach acid in the shower room.

I was sick with the stomach flu that whole day.

kernow
July 29th, 2005, 02:01 PM
'flimsy would be
didn't like a set
just felt like leaving for no particular reason"

I do that all of the time. My coach is used to me.

:D

To the poster from Brooklyn: forget about it!

It sounds like you were just tired and needed a rest. Remember: You pay your training fees- no one else does- so take what you need from the training. Loyalty is very important, but you also need to do what you need to do.

shoalsswimmer
July 29th, 2005, 02:14 PM
Being hungover is a flimsy reason for getting out or getting in late.

I happened to get into the pool late one day for a Saturday morning practice. Had a pretty bad headache though I was there on time but was kind of incapacitated. Told my teammates I had an awful headache.

On the way to practice I choked down half of a little cinnamon roll, 16 oz water and a Goody Powder for the head.

I stood under a shower of warm water for about ten minutes right next to the pool during warm up.

Felt a little better; missed most of the warm up. I got in and about halfway through the mainset, I was cured. The first few flip turns were nauseating.

Lesson learned? If you have an early moring practice, be careful of how many adult beverages you consume the night before.

Guvnah
July 29th, 2005, 04:10 PM
Something shoalswimmer said made me think of this...

Sometimes I get headaches when my blood pressure is too LOW. It's hard to differentiate these headaches from other types of headaches, but a sure cure for it is doing some vigorous activity (like a swimming workout!) to get things pumping better. My tendency is to pull into my shell when I get a headache. Vegetate. Sleep. But the low-blood-pressure headaches will not get better for me that way.

The problem with doing a workout to try curing such a headache is that it may not be a low-blood-pressure headache, and then I just make it worse. I know it pretty quickly into the workout, and that's a time I'll get out early.

hmlee
July 29th, 2005, 06:35 PM
So are college coaches as evil as high school/ age group coaches? I'm starting to get nervous now, hah.

It's not like I plan on not showing up for practice or climbing out in the middle, but .....well sometimes I might have a headache...or feel a little queasy...from...late night..festivities...yeah.....

Karen Duggan
July 30th, 2005, 01:22 AM
I didn't get out today, but I know I'm fighting a cold and just don't feel well, really sluggish in the water. I did try this though: at the end of my crappy workout I asked for a timed push 50. I figured that I know I feel like crap, what would my time be? If it was bad I attribute it to feeling bad, if it was OK then I'm stoked because I'll go even faster when I feel better!

It was better than I expected :) So I left on a cheery note!

How's that for positive thinking?

some_girl
July 30th, 2005, 12:38 PM
Thanks for cheering me up, everyone. I never swam age group or college, so it isn't a hangover from that--just don't like not finishing. Something like stubborness, pride, and perfectionism mixed together or something. Anyway, thanks, you're all awesome.

julesmom
July 30th, 2005, 03:56 PM
I get in when I get there and get out when I have to or can't anymore. I just started a diet so am trying to get caught up with my energy levels or should I say, I don't want to overdo it so I get out after 30-45 mins. I just started swimming a month ago anyways and now want to build up a little at a time, so no I don't feel bad for getting out early.

Matt S
August 1st, 2005, 02:19 PM
Some,

Not only is leaving early excusable, I believe that in some circumstances it is ESSENTIAL to pull the plug on a bad workout.

- Injury avoidance: one of the most valuable lessons I learned as a masters swimmer was knowing when to back off. I had a very wise, former swimmer himself for a coach in my early to mid 30s. Up until that time, I went after every workout like I was back in college, max speed, lowest sustainable interval, work at the edge of tollerable pain threshold. He taught me when to recognize I needed to back off. Why? I ain't 21 anymore. My body could recover from a pounding then that would leave me incapacitated for weeks today. Listen to your body. As my yoga coach has pointed out, sometimes if you "ask it nicely" and work into it gradually, you'll be able to do difficult things. Conversely, when it says no, pushing through can get you hurt. Knowing routine, normal workout pain, from the kind that should tell you you're going to hurt yourself is difficult, but you got to recognize that the latter does exist.

- Keeping mentally fresh: why are you in masters swimming, and how long do you plan on participating? Me, I'm in this for the VERY long term (think decades of swimming and enjoying it). If I have a lousy workout, the zest is not there, or I can't do today the work on my off strokes, I have two choices. I can gut it through, be in pain during and after the workout, wonder what I accomplished, and have a negative experience causing me to consider whether I still want to do this. Or, I can modify the work out to something I can do, or simply leave and try to do better next time. I sometimes chose the latter if it's a truly crappy workout, because that is easier to write off as a bad day, and I am happier about coming back for the next workout. My swimming is no longer about a personal record in the next 3 weeks (or it is not very often). It is about participating for the next 30 years. You are older; you will have crappy workouts for inexplicable reasons, and be perfectly fine in a day or two. Flush the bad before it becomes horrendous. Forget about "character building." You're a grown up and your character is pretty well set.

- Seeing the warning signs: suppose you have one bad workout, and you gut it through, but the next couple of weeks you have one bad workout after another and you gut through all of them. Are you working yourself to a frazzle and you need rest, or is something else wrong? When Lance Armstrong had the first symptoms of testicular cancer, he assumed he was out of shape and just kept working harder. Finally, when he realized it was not conditioning and went to a doc, they found it had metasticized. In contrast, I went through a few months with about every other workout being so bad, I just got up and left. I knew I had enough rest between that was not the problem, so I went to see a doc. Tests indicated I was borderline anemic (duh, gee, that might acount for something in an endurance sport like swimming), and he told me to take some vitamins with iron. Worked like magic.

- Not practicing lousy stroke technique: if you are tired, your stroke falls apart. If you don't have it today, and you are really stressed just keeping up, odds are high your stroke is falling apart as a side-effect. Don't practice bad technique. 'Nuff said.

Please keep in mind you are in control of your participation. You get to decide what you are willing to do, and you (much more so than your coach) are responsible to yourself to do only things that are safe for you. You can chose to do that long fly set, but only because YOU want to. Once you realize it is about what you want, and not what is written on the dry eraser board, it is a very liberating feeling.

Matt

Bob McAdams
August 1st, 2005, 03:20 PM
Originally posted by Matt S
Injury avoidance: one of the most valuable lessons I learned as a masters swimmer was knowing when to back off. I had a very wise, former swimmer himself for a coach in my early to mid 30s. Up until that time, I went after every workout like I was back in college, max speed, lowest sustainable interval, work at the edge of tollerable pain threshold. He taught me when to recognize I needed to back off. Why? I ain't 21 anymore. My body could recover from a pounding then that would leave me incapacitated for weeks today.

Actually, this is a consideration for swimmers of all ages. About a week ago, I had the experience of coaching a 12-year-old girl who had had shoulder surgery earlier this year. I've even heard of competitive swimmers as young as 9 having shoulder problems. Hopefully, though, we who are adults have acquired enough sense to know that we shouldn't keep pushing our bodies even when they are telling us to stop.


Bob