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ande
July 30th, 2005, 12:02 PM
Davis eyes comeback bid amid juggling family life
San Antonio Express (subscription), TX - Jul 23, 2005
San Antonio resident and former Olympic swimmer Josh Davis, at age 32, is planning a comeback. Josh Davis hopes to add to his total of five Olympic medals.

Davis eyes comeback bid amid juggling family life
Web Posted: 07/24/2005 12:00 AM CDT

Lorne Chan
Express-News Staff Writer

San Antonio resident and former Olympic swimmer Josh Davis, at age 32, is planning a comeback.

(William Luther / Express-News)

Josh Davis hopes to add to his total of five Olympic medals.
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Davis took the past year off and is not competing at the World Swimming Championships this week in Montreal.
But he hopes to qualify for the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing.

He began training again Monday and said he will do so three hours a day beginning Aug. 15, when school starts for some of his children.

"I'm still the fastest guy in the world who's 32 years old with five kids," said Davis, a former Churchill and Texas standout.

Davis also has five Olympic medals. He won three gold medals in 1996 in Atlanta and two silvers in 2000 in Sydney. He fell short of making the 2004 team at the U.S. Olympic trials in Long Beach, Calif.

It's a different world for Davis now that he is balancing being a father of five, including 7-month-old Liam, with training.

"It really doesn't have much to do with age. It has to do with the ability to give much time," Davis said. "Some swimmers can spend five hours a day in the pool and I can't."

Between 1996 and 2000, Davis established himself as the top 200-meter freestyle swimmer in the United States. He set the American record in that event at the trials in 2000.

His American record has since been broken by Michael Phelps. Last summer, Davis' dream of a third-straight Olympics ended when he lost in the semifinals of the 200 free at the trials.

"Before the trials, a lot of times I had to choose the kids or the pool," he said. "There were so many days I chose the kids and I don't regret it."

After Davis did not make the Olympic team, he decided to take a year off, coaching at clinics and giving speeches instead.

He is looking for local sponsors to support him so he can devote more time and energy to training.

"My dream sponsor is H-E-B, since we spend all our money there on diapers anyway," he said.

Davis will split time between training in San Antonio pools, including the one named for him at Blossom Athletic Center. He will also commute to Austin occasionally to swim at the UT facility.

"Josh just does so many things right, lives right, trains right," said UT coach Eddie Reese, who coached the U.S. Olympic team in Athens. "I think he can make a comeback, but at some point during a comeback, you have to work harder than you've ever worked."

from
http://www.mysanantonio.com/sports/stories/MYSA072405.5C.SWMdavis.2c83195.html

Sam Perry
July 30th, 2005, 07:33 PM
Would love to see Josh make a comeback. He is such an inspirational guy and the world of swimming definitely needs someone who is so well spoken and represents all that's right with the sport.

valhallan
July 31st, 2005, 08:30 AM
Finding the time to train seems to be his only hurdle. That would be an incredible comeback story.

The Seabiscuit of swimming.

If anything, there are many examples of masters swimmers today who are performing as good as, if not better, than they did in college. Whether or not these people just never hit their potential.... or simply found that the effects age don't creep in as soon as it was believed is something that Josh can prove.

gull
July 31st, 2005, 08:58 AM
Originally posted by valhallan
If anything, there are many examples of masters swimmers today who are performing as good as, if not better, than they did in college. Whether or not these people just never hit their potential.... or simply found that the effects age don't creep in as soon as it was believed is something that Josh can prove.

I think Eddie Reese's comment could be applied to Masters swimmers (or at least those who were out of swimming for several years): "I think he can make a comeback, but at some point during a comeback, you have to work harder than you've ever worked."

valhallan
July 31st, 2005, 10:43 AM
...and not to turn this into the dreaded topic..but at age 'thirty something' he's only dropped 10 beats per minute off of his maximum heart rate. That doesn't seem like it would make a difference in performance.

He's also been actively swimming since his Olympic days....which is contrary to most "older" athletes on the comeback road who may have gone through a brief retirement period. Age may not be a factor for him.

gull
July 31st, 2005, 12:14 PM
In Swimming Fastest, Maglischo makes the point that it takes longer to regain athletic performance (based on various parameters) than it did to lose it.

As for Masters swimmers performing better than they did in college, I wonder how common this really is. I suspect that the top ten, at least in my age group (45-49), is dominated by swimmers who were very fast in college and, while slower now (just like everyone else), are still faster than the competition.

valhallan
July 31st, 2005, 04:09 PM
Originally posted by gull80

As for Masters swimmers performing better than they did in college, I wonder how common this really is.

Probably not a large percentage... but there certainly are some who are performing very close to their times from their twenties. Shorter distances races are probably closest in times by comparison.

Speaking from personal experience, my current 50 free time untapered & unshaved is just slightly over a second slower than my PB of 21.25 circa 1984. This is with only 15,000 yards a week compared to nearly 10,000 per day. Either less practice is better...or my times should have been faster when I was younger. I don't suppose all the beer guzzling back then could have affected performances ? :)

Peter Cruise
July 31st, 2005, 04:59 PM
The beer guzzling doesn't seem to slow down Tall Paul...

craiglll@yahoo.com
August 1st, 2005, 11:19 AM
Originally posted by gull80
In Swimming Fastest, Maglischo makes the point that it takes longer to regain athletic performance (based on various parameters) than it did to lose it.

As for Masters swimmers performing better than they did in college, I wonder how common this really is. I suspect that the top ten, at least in my age group (45-49), is dominated by swimmers who were very fast in college and, while slower now (just like everyone else), are still faster than the competition.

He also says that if you are in good shape prior to getting out of shape, it will take you less time to retrun to form.