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keyone
August 18th, 2005, 12:37 PM
Hi,

I just joined a master's swim team and I don't understand all the lingo on the drill sheets (It's been 20 years since I've been on a swim team). What the heck is "4x100 odds free" or "8x50 Indianna", "200 over kick", "400 Rev IM 50 drill 50 swim"....there's lots more on the sheet that I don't get, but hopefully you get the idea!

I need something like "swim drills for dummies"!

Thanks if you can help. :confused:

Rob Copeland
August 18th, 2005, 02:11 PM
First congratulations on joining a Masters swim team!

If you don’t understand the coach’s workout nomenclature, then ask the coach or a lane mate.

From “swim drills for dummies”
Definitions: 4x100 odds free
4 – this is a number; hold up your right hand with all fingers extender, palm facing in, fold your thumb over your palm, most people will now have “4” fingers extended (an exception to this is aquageek who would have “6” fingers extended)
x – this it the mathematical symbol for times used in multiplication
100 – this is also a number that in this case represents a distance, in yards or meters (an exception to this is thegoodsmith who must be thinking in term of feet, no one is fast enough to do those times in yards)
odds – sometimes refers to the triathletes in the pool with the real swimmers, but in this case refers to odd numbers (such as 1, 3, 5, 9)
free – shorthand for freestyle, which can be any stroke but is usually swum as the crawl stroke (note some will take this free opportunity to demonstrate their butterfly prowess)

So putting it all together; 4x100 odds free – swim 100 yards 4 times, with number 1 and 3 crawl stroke and number 2 and 4 not-crawl.

keyone
August 18th, 2005, 02:50 PM
Thanks for the reply.

> If you don’t understand the coach’s workout
> nomenclature, then ask the coach or a lane mate.

Actually, the coach wasn't there today for my second practice, and I did ask a few questions of my lane mates. But, I didn't want to interrupt their workout with all my stupid questions. So, I just did my own thing, mostly practiced the stroke drills that the coach showed me the first day. (I can't believe how much swim form has changed since 20 years ago).

Anyway, I just thought it would make sense to study up on the lingo before my next practice.

> From “swim drills for dummies”
> Definitions: 4x100 odds free

Is there such a book or website (I could not find a website)?

> odds – sometimes refers to the triathletes in the pool
> with the real swimmers, but in this case...

Uh, guess that makes me an 'odd'. :eek:

sdswimmer
November 15th, 2005, 03:41 PM
I need tha tbook too!
When you are told to swim "base plus 10" and then they write 10 on the side (which I'm told is the rest time) what exactly am I supposed to do? Lets suppsoe this is for 4x100 and that my "normal/easy" 100 is 2:10. Help!

How do i know how long a 200 takes if my time clock only shows seocnds (do I assume the minutes based on previous times), when I have a build set do I need to check the clock each length or just go by general feel, and while we're at it-build vs. decrease?


THis pool stuff sure can be confusing!

craiglll@yahoo.com
November 15th, 2005, 04:00 PM
Originally posted by sdswimmer


How do i know how long a 200 takes if my time clock only shows seocnds (do I assume the minutes based on previous times), when I have a build set do I need to check the clock each length or just go by general feel, and while we're at it-build vs. decrease?



Believe me, what you just said is brilliant. I don't know how many times I've heard coaches say somehting like on 2:10 and there is no regular clock in sight. It is almost impossible for me to figure out the progression. I was once told to do something on 1: 40. I never did get the time down. I just did the swim and waited for what I thought would be the right time. It woudl have been so much more clear if he had said somehting like on 10seconds rest or something. What was even worse was the coach said to do it on hard pace the even and moderate pace the odds. Unbelieveably, that man is now a coach a very good high school.