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squintytwinkie
September 29th, 2005, 05:13 PM
Ugh..i'm so fat. I have a mild gut and like the ugly man boobs...moobs. :( This makes me feel a little self concious especially since i'm starting Club swwimming for the first time. :( I feel so fat. :(

scyfreestyler
September 29th, 2005, 05:18 PM
Hey, at least you are doing something about it! Right? Get out there and swim your heart out. Burn boatloads of calories and transform your body into something that you want. Most importantly, don't worry about what others think. A little gut and "man boobs" are a sight that is quite common at my local pool. I would not sweat it.

jswim
September 29th, 2005, 05:33 PM
I know it's easier said than done, but don't worry about it. When you start to worry about it, you won't enjoy swimming as much, and it may just be self defeating.

There are a couple of guys that swim occasionally with us at practice that have larger physiques and they kick ass! They're just as fast and faster during some sets, as anyone else swimming with us, and no-one thinks of them negatively at all.

Remember we all tend to be more critical of ourselves than of other people (at least most of us). And above all HAVE FUN!

geochuck
September 29th, 2005, 05:47 PM
I am 260 lbs and feel great about it. If people don't like my body they can look the other way. I still wear my speedo. The only shame you can have is if you feel ashamed.

scyfreestyler
September 29th, 2005, 05:52 PM
Originally posted by geochuck
I am 260 lbs and feel great about it. If people don't like my body they can look the other way. I still wear my speedo. The only shame you can have is if you feel ashamed. Good post and an even better attitude George!

geochuck
September 29th, 2005, 05:59 PM
Just a thought in 1964 I started the swim season weighing 255 lbs on July 9th by the time my race season was over swimming 350 miles of races plus training and eating bad fish in Egypt I arrived home on October 23 weighing 182 lbs. Now that was something to be ashamed of, not my weight but eating the bad fish.

dorothyrde
September 29th, 2005, 06:02 PM
If I let fatness get in my way 5 years ago, well, I would still be sitting on the pool deck, so get in there and swim. Honest, no lap swimmers look, they are too busy swimming. And if anyone else looks, tough, you are doing what you need to do to get in shape.

cinc3100
September 29th, 2005, 11:03 PM
I probably one of the fatter swimmers around here. Yesterday there was this woman younger than me and weight a lot less,I was only about 5 seconds behind her in breaststroke kick. For many swimmers if you are heavier probably breastroke is less effective by being overweight.

PeirsolFan
September 30th, 2005, 04:12 AM
My experience has been that you "burn more sugar than you do fat" (Mr. Peirsol said so therefore...) and that my core hasn't
changed much. After reaching my second highest weight ever then losing 15 pounds from swimming I threw the scale out.

The point is you're moving! You're heart and mind healthy! :)

JimCanSwim
September 30th, 2005, 07:51 AM
I agree with all the posters so far.

I've lost alot of weight and I have some saggy bits. You have to just do your own thing.

There seems to be a perception out there that if you're fat, you shouldn't be seen in public trying to exercise. This is JUST WRONG!

Before I started swimming, I would walk to get some aerobic exercise. One day while I was walking on the sidewalk, someone in a car threw an empty bag of fast food at me and yelled out "Get off the street, fatso". It was a little startling when it happened. However, on some level it just ticked me off. And I didn't stop. It spurred me on to walk even more. My feeling was: Screw Them! The sidewalk is for everybody. I'll walk where I want, when I want.

So keep up the good work, squinty! Set your sights on your goals and don't let anyone distract you from them!

waves101
September 30th, 2005, 09:24 AM
I once heard a question asked....

"Did you ever notice all of the people you see out exercising are the ones who don't look like they need to be exercising?"

I think the point is clear.

Mswimming
September 30th, 2005, 12:08 PM
This makes me feel a little self concious especially since i'm starting Club swwimming for the first time.

I was there only a few months ago. When I started again I weighed 230 at 6'2". I felt completely intimidated going to a well known club and starting up with the masters team. And it didn't help when my wife said, "you can't be seen in that! :eek:" seeing me in my speedo before the first practice. My confidence was shaken, but I still went and just focused on the workouts, not my appearance, and the weight has been taking care of itself.

This morning I stepped on the scale and weigh a fairly fit 203!

Kevin

Peter Cruise
September 30th, 2005, 03:27 PM
I think it is disgraceful the way overweight people are treated in our society. Yes, I recognize the health issues, but nothing excuses the rudeness & contempt with which the overweight can be treated (even with retail situations!). There have been situations where a 'fat person' has carried a hidden camera & the reaction of apparently 'normal' people to them is shocking. They wouldn't treat their dogs that way.

It has nothing to do with the issue of overconsumption, just bad manners. The less we 'buy into' that way of thinking, the less stressed we will be about some extra pounds, the more willing we would be to do something about it in public.

And of course, the whole condition of anorexia & related eating disorders is the flip side of the same issues (unhealthy societal fixation on body image), except those who are starving themselves to death gets lots of compliments right up until they're admitted to hospital.

geochuck
September 30th, 2005, 03:51 PM
When I shop for clothing they seldom have my size, I look and then ask if they have any men's clothing as all you have here is boy's clothing.

aquageek
September 30th, 2005, 03:56 PM
Originally posted by Peter Cruise
I think it is disgraceful the way overweight people are treated in our society.

Conversely, they also place an enormous burden on our society by lost productivity, horrific health issues, etc.

geochuck
September 30th, 2005, 03:59 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
Conversely, they also place an enormous burden on our society by lost productivity, horrific health issues, etc. Are you talking about fat people or the Mal nourished skinny ones.

dorothyrde
September 30th, 2005, 04:07 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
Conversely, they also place an enormous burden on our society by lost productivity, horrific health issues, etc.

But treating them rudely is not going to help them overcome the problem. A little compassion goes a long way. If an obese person could snap their fingers and be thin, I am sure they would, it just is not that easy to lose weight, and then once lost keep it off. It is really, really, really hard.

aquageek
September 30th, 2005, 04:12 PM
I do totally understand the issues associated with both gaining and losing weight. Check out your pool next January and then again in February.

Fishgrrl
September 30th, 2005, 04:15 PM
Squintytwinkie -

Please, please, please...I beg of you....try to not let your body image get in the way of getting in the water!! We have all different shapes and sizes at our club - and honestly, when see the "heavier folks" donning a suit and working out, my one thought is "right on!!"

That being said....on a personal note - I have lost and gained over 200 pounds in my time. I've been...shall we say, in bartender lingo - on both sides of the wood. I've suffered from a horrible body image since I was a teen and my life has gone something like this: skinny kid, overweight teen, anorexic/bulimic 20 something, neurotic 30 something and finally (and I hope it's not too little, too late!), in my 40s, I have settled down with my body rather than bucking against. Thankfully, I am more than likely in better shape than I was in my 20s!

I now believe that food is fuel and helps me swim well. I'm not perfect, but I've learned a lot and putting on a suit is not one of life's easy things to do...but I encourage you, from the bottom of my heart, as someone who's kind of been there, to put on that suit and walk out on that pool deck....

Respectfully,
Kari (who is cheering for you in my own corner of the swimming world)

Peter Cruise
September 30th, 2005, 04:17 PM
Geek- but 'they' are us, our brothers, sisters, mom, dad, friends & deserve no worse treatment than everyone else. Anorexic people can place similar burdens on the health care system, yet they are frequently treated with compassion, even as victims.

geochuck
September 30th, 2005, 04:34 PM
I guess I am lucky I am proud of my body at all times fat and skinny times. I am neither mal nourished or feel oversized. Are you healthy when you are thin it all depends are you healthy when you are large it all depends. I am 6'3" tall weigh 260lbs my waist is 42" my butt is 46" my chest is 52", I have not cost the med system anything except half a knee. I am the way I want to be. If I train hard this year I will weigh in at about 225, which would be 110 lbs lighter than my heaviest weight. Did I feel bad about wearing a speedo when I was 335 - no. I felt the same as I do now. To much money is spent on trying to be thin.

aquageek
September 30th, 2005, 04:35 PM
I doubt the anorexic population places the type of strain on our resources that the tens of millions of obese Americans do over the course of their lifetimes.

AquaShrimp
September 30th, 2005, 04:38 PM
At a moderate pace, a swimmer can burn 60% fat and 40% glucose.

dorothyrde
September 30th, 2005, 04:54 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
I doubt the anorexic population places the type of strain on our resources that the tens of millions of obese Americans do over the course of their lifetimes.

"Chet", the original poster is trying to overcome anxiety about being fat, and getting in the water to help do something about it. How is treating that person rudely because they put a strain on our resources going to help get them moving and doing something about it. It is more likely to drive that person to emotional eating, and more problems.

hmlee
September 30th, 2005, 06:33 PM
Please squinty, don't quit (or worse, not even try) swimming! I'm struggling with weight issues myself. I was once a competitive swimmer and in (okay) but not great shape for that length of time. When I quit due to burnout I gained weight and lost self confidence.

I'm now joining my University swim team in an effort to get back to and surpass my old competitive swimmer self. Believe me, it's going to be hard everyday getting into a suit and going out there to swim. I'm swimming with lots of girls who are in so much better shape because they've been consistantly swimming...but I'm going to keep going anyway as long as they let me!

So, keep going to your pool and keep getting in the water. Then, before you know it, you'll be one of the fit ones who gets to help newcomers get over their fears and get into the water too!

newmastersswimmer
October 3rd, 2005, 08:00 AM
I just want to let you know that no matter how overweight you are, I believe you can always still lose it and get back into the kind of shape you want.....I have mentioned here several times before that I can personally vouch for this b/c about 18 months ago when I started back into swimming again (after an 18 year break), I was up to 275 pounds and feeling horrible.....By SCY Nationals last May I was already down to 185 pounds.....So far I have simply been maintaining that weight......I think this is the ideal weight for me....It is still about 10 pounds over what I weighed in college....but none-the-less, I feel really comfortable now at that weight. As long as you workout consistently and eat a healthy balanced diet, I think you will be suprised at how fast the weight will come off. Good Luck and don't give up!


Newmastersswimmer

Kevin in MD
October 3rd, 2005, 09:49 AM
Originally posted by AquaShrimp
At a moderate pace, a swimmer can burn 60% fat and 40% glucose.

You could put just about any numbers in your statement and have it be true. Varies widely over the population.

At my resting metabolic rate test a few months ago i burned 60% glucose and 40% fat. I was just sitting there.

geochuck
October 3rd, 2005, 10:02 AM
When I go to Mexico (ah ha leave Nov 7th to April 6th) I swim, I bike, I walk, I rest a lot, I lose weight, I drink beer, Magaritas, Wine, I eat lots of beef, chicken, pork, rice, fish, especially shrimp and tacos.

I think this is the way to lose fat, but if I don't lose weight I don't care.

art_z
October 3rd, 2005, 11:44 AM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
But treating them rudely is not going to help them overcome the problem. A little compassion goes a long way. If an obese person could snap their fingers and be thin, I am sure they would, it just is not that easy to lose weight, and then once lost keep it off. It is really, really, really hard.

losing weight is as easy as gaining it. just like overweight individuals don't snap their fingers to get fat, they can't snap their fingers and be thin. for all the idiocy being hawked on tv, the sure fire way to lose weight, and to keep it off, is the eat right and exercise, consistently, over a period of time. unless you have a thyroid or other metabolic illness, which some people really do, there is no excuse for not being obese other than laziness.

i've been close to 300lbs, i'm at 240 now (13% body fat), 6'3". for years i just didnt care what i ate or what i looked like, probably making up for the years as an age group/collegiate swimmer that I HAD to care. My blood pressure was through the roof and it was either make corrections to save my health or live on medication for the rest of my life. the choice was easy.

dorothyrde
October 3rd, 2005, 01:38 PM
Did you know that when you gain more than 20-30 pounds, you actually gain more fat cells, the existing ones don't just fill up more. But when you lose weight, those new fat cells are still there, they don't go away. So losing weight is not as easy as gaining weight, and for women, I think it is much harder than it is for men. Those fat cells are just waiting to be refilled.

I am not saying that the obese people of the world should not lose weight, they should especially for their health. I am just saying the rest of us who are more normal weight should not treat them like they are a plague. Just have some compassion, losing weight is hard, keeping it off is harder.

I talk regularly on the Weight Watchers boards. One woman has lost over 100 pounds, would like to lose 20 more, and she goes on plateaus for 6 months at a time where her body just won't budge even though she is doing all the right things including consulting a nutrionist to help her through it. If she did not have the resolve that she has, it would have been easy for her to give up a long time ago. Especially when one of her plateaus was at 200 pounds.

I work with a woman who is discouraged with her weight, but I don't think she mentally has gotten prepared to lose. She often gives in to poor choices in food, is easily swayed by the office sweets laying around. She just has not built up the resistance needed to change her eating habits. She has a lot of health issues and would probably be better off 100 pounds lighter, but mentally I don't think she is ready to take that journey.

When I lost my weight, it took lots of energy and sticktoitofness. It still takes that to keep off weight, and aging only makes it worse. For whatever reason, some people don't have the confidence and support to lose weight. It is not an easy task.

F'ueco
October 4th, 2005, 12:46 AM
Originally posted by Mswimming
I was there only a few months ago. When I started again I weighed 230 at 6'2". I felt completely intimidated going to a well known club and starting up with the masters team. And it didn't help when my wife said, "you can't be seen in that! :eek:" seeing me in my speedo before the first practice. My confidence was shaken, but I still went and just focused on the workouts, not my appearance, and the weight has been taking care of itself.

This morning I stepped on the scale and weigh a fairly fit 203!

Kevin

This rings for me as well. On Memorial Day I decided that I needed to lose some weight. I was at 205 then (at 6'0"). Now I am a relatively trim 180 and getting into crazier and crazier endurance events. Yesterday was the Olympic distance triathlon. Now I'm aiming for a half-Ironman. And some longer swims of course!

dorothyrde
October 4th, 2005, 11:47 AM
This is on MSNBC:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7279844/did/9583615/


Page 2

The study shows Americans live in an “environment in which it’s hard not to become overweight or obese. Unless people actively work against that, that’s what’s most likely to happen to them.”



I think many people don't actively work against it, hence our national problem.

aquageek
October 4th, 2005, 12:04 PM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
...that’s what’s most likely to happen to them.”

There are a lot of tempting tasty treats all around us. For instance, I have it on good authority that some on this forum, who shall remain nameless, have a certain love for fried twinkies. We shouldn't hold this against gull80, he can't help himself.

However, just because there are temptations doesn't mean you have to give in. I believe getting morbidly obese is a full time job whereas doing a marginal amount of fitness activity requires much less action.

Mswimming
October 4th, 2005, 12:39 PM
Originally posted by F'ueco
This rings for me as well. On Memorial Day I decided that I needed to lose some weight. I was at 205 then (at 6'0"). Now I am a relatively trim 180 and getting into crazier and crazier endurance events. Yesterday was the Olympic distance triathlon. Now I'm aiming for a half-Ironman. And some longer swims of course!

That is awesome! Congratulations on the weight loss. It hard to work out just for the sake of losing weight, but when you have some other goal in mind, like a half-Ironman, its somehow easier to focus on that and let the weight take care of itself. You even start to watch what you eat and look at food as (like some else mentioned) fuel.

Good luck with the half-Ironman. Finishing something like that would be a huge accomplishment.

dorothyrde
October 4th, 2005, 02:43 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
There are a lot of tempting tasty treats all around us. For instance, I have it on good authority that some on this forum, who shall remain nameless, have a certain love for fried twinkies. We shouldn't hold this against gull80, he can't help himself.

However, just because there are temptations doesn't mean you have to give in. I believe getting morbidly obese is a full time job whereas doing a marginal amount of fitness activity requires much less action.

I have never had a fried twinkie....that just sounds gross. :eek:


Once an overweight person shifts into that obese column, moving is more painful and a lot more tough. Yes, it is what they need to do, and on the WW boards, when people ask how to get into the habit of exercising, I always say start with 20 minutes a day, and as your body adjusts and gets used to that start. But it is getting started that is so very hard for people.

Nope, no one force feeds people, although I have had friends and family members tell me I am skinny now, why don't I just have...... and someone who is not strong enough would give in, heck I give in at times.

And losing the weight is not as easy as gaining the weight, you can think it is, but it just plain is not.

There is a lot more to being obese than just an eating problem, just as there is a lot more to anoerexia than an eating problem.

Here is a website to read:

www.fatmanwalking.com

gull
October 4th, 2005, 02:50 PM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
I have never had a fried twinkie....that just sounds gross. :eek:

In the South they will fry anything that stands still (including a Snickers bar). I myself have never had a fried twinkie, but I admit to an occasional Krispy Kreme (which I eat in private, of course, since I am a cardiologist).

dorothyrde
October 4th, 2005, 02:58 PM
Now I have had Krispy Kreme, and to be honest I thought, what's the big deal. Guess I am not big on fried foods.

Geek, I have been wondering, how much weight have you lost, or have you been overweight before. You mentioned stopping smoking which is very hard. Did that cause weight gain, or are you a naturally thin person?

gull
October 4th, 2005, 03:05 PM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
Now I have had Krispy Kreme, and to be honest I thought, what's the big deal. Guess I am not big on fried foods.

Yes, but did you eat one hot off of the conveyor belt? That is key.

Not that anyone should be eating these things, of course.

dorothyrde
October 4th, 2005, 03:26 PM
No, usually they are sold by organizations so they have to be brought over from Indy in the wee hours of the morning. So by the time you get them, they are 6-7 hours old. Lotta hype for an old doughnut. No Krispy Kremes in C-U.

aquageek
October 4th, 2005, 03:45 PM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
Geek, I have been wondering, how much weight have you lost, or have you been overweight before. You mentioned stopping smoking which is very hard. Did that cause weight gain, or are you a naturally thin person?

I hit 199 and my mother in law called me fat or, in her parlance, "you gotta be worried about a guy your size who hits 200 before age 30." I was 27 at the time.

I lost about 35 pounds, maybe 45, mostly through starvation and excessive smoking. The swimming came a few years later.

Everyone I know who is fat talks incessantly about two things, their weight and their plans to lose it. I commend you for taking the necessary steps to skip the Doritos aisle and hit the lap lanes.

BTW - gull80 is skinnier than me so he can indulge in the occasional donut. I had to give those up unfortunately.

dorothyrde
October 4th, 2005, 04:01 PM
Oh yes, doughnuts might as well be applied to my hips, cause that is where they end up if I eat them.

I agree that many overweight people do more talking than doing, but I think that is because it is hard to do. Starvation and smoking sure aint the way to do it as you found out. Doing it sensibly takes a long time and lots of perseverance. We live in a I want it now society.

I have a big concern about todays children. when I am at either my sons or daughters schools, kids today are heavy. I would have fit in better now, and been one of the small ones, than in the 70's when I was a teen and was one of the big ones.

Big parents a lot of times, have big kids. The kids are not growing up with the skills they need to stay healthy and fit, because it is not part of their parents lives. These kids are just going to grow up and get heavier and heavier, and likely not have a clue how to lose the weight and keep it off.

They certainly don't learn it at school either. Candy and pop machines make the school money, cutting PE saves the schools money, and the PE classes they have are usually not that active. My son told me last year he liked when they played a certain game, because all the "lazy" kids had an option to stroll around the track while the kids who really wanted to play played.

Just telling someone to lose weight is not going to help. Some people don't even understand what a portion size is, or how much of something they should have each day.

Not sure what the answer is, but I see this getting worse and worse not better.

gull
October 4th, 2005, 04:09 PM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
Doing it sensibly takes a long time and lots of perseverance. We live in a I want it now society.

How about "I want it now, and I don't want to have to work at it"? Which explains the attraction of liposuction, gastric bypass, and TI. It's amazing the number of people who would rather undergo a risky operation than exercise and diet.

hmlee
October 4th, 2005, 05:01 PM
Of course, the other issue is that it is so easy to fail at losing weight - or getting into a healthy exercise routine. You miss going to the gym that one time......and....poof! Your routine collapses.

It's a lot harder at failing to eat a fried twinky or krispy kreme.

Unless you have a hyper metabolisim, gaining weight takes no effort. Losing it does.

aquageek
October 4th, 2005, 05:06 PM
Originally posted by gull80
... and TI.

You just can't help yourself, can you?

People may not understand a portion, dorotyde, but they know a Big Mac supersized sure isn't healthy eating.

My daughter's school does not have soda. They don't allow kindergartners to even get desert except on Friday. They also have a vegetarian diet. This is public school.

I will never forget being at my 5 year old's swim meet last winter and watching this HUGE couple eat hotdogs, a huge bag of candy and 2 liters of soda in two hours. It was disgusting. I saw them a month later do the same thing at the all star meet.

aquageek
October 4th, 2005, 05:10 PM
Originally posted by hmlee
gaining weight takes no effort. Losing it does.

That's a bunch of bologna. Devoting yourself to an unhealthy lifestyle takes just as much effort as devoting yourself to healthy living. People always say it's hard to lose weight forgetting the countless hours spent piling on the pounds leading up to that point.

hmlee
October 4th, 2005, 05:35 PM
Heh. Yes, I suppose you could say that driving to McDs takes just the same effort as driving to the gym....

But it's not like everyone who gains weight eats at McDs or wherever all the time. It doesn't require devotion to a completely unhealthy lifestyle to gain weight. So perhaps to say it takes no effort is incorrect...but at least in the minds of most people it takes considerably more effort to exercise than to not.

dorothyrde
October 4th, 2005, 05:40 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
That's a bunch of bologna. Devoting yourself to an unhealthy lifestyle takes just as much effort as devoting yourself to healthy living. People always say it's hard to lose weight forgetting the countless hours spent piling on the pounds leading up to that point.

Geek, when your daughter is in High School, tell me what kind of soda and candy machines they have. The k-2 here does not have machines either, then wham, there they are 3-12.

If you have a tendency to gain weight, it is very very easy to gain, no effort at all. I have worked my tail off since August, and watched my portions, and eaten a very clean diet.....I have lost 5 pounds in 8 weeks. Granted, I think I have gained some muscle, because I am back into a smaller size, but it can be so disappointing to work really hard, and the body won't budge. I am trying to get 10 pounds off, how much harder would it be to my mental state to work this hard and have 100 pounds to lose.

dorothyrde
October 4th, 2005, 05:43 PM
Oh and Gull, you got me laughing, gotta slip that TI slam in there doncha.

art_z
October 5th, 2005, 10:21 AM
here is proof of how easy it is to lose weight, in your wallet at least !! :)

Dr Phil Weight Loss Plan (http://www.cnn.com/2005/LAW/10/04/dr.phil/index.html)

aquageek
October 5th, 2005, 10:23 AM
Here's all you need to know:

Unhappy dieters told CNN Radio that after listening to McGraw they believed they could lose weight by taking the pills alone.

A fool and his money are soon parted...except if they can file a lawsuit shortly thereafter.

dorothyrde
October 5th, 2005, 11:28 AM
"The suit alleges that the plan is useless. It called for dieters to take 22 herbal supplements and vitamin pills a day and cost about $120 a month. The plan also advised dieters to adopt a low-calorie diet and to exercise. "

Geez, all they had to do is the last sentence and would have been ok, whata crook.

Or maybe I should say crock, people are so stupid.

gull
October 5th, 2005, 01:18 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
Unhappy dieters told CNN Radio that after listening to McGraw they believed they could lose weight by taking the pills alone.


Because that's what they wanted to believe. Much like thinking you can swim like Thorpe via fish-like swimming drills.

dorothyrde
October 5th, 2005, 01:40 PM
Originally posted by gull80
Because that's what they wanted to believe. Much like thinking you can swim like Thorpe via fish-like swimming drills.

Dang I can't?<there you go, bringing TI in, guess it gets the thread back to swimming>

Fitswimmer04
November 17th, 2005, 09:14 PM
I've been away from swimming and exercise for quite a while. It started with an ankle injury, but then turned into lazy. Yes, I'll admit it, I've been lazy about working out and not watching what I ate. So, guess what? I'm FAT! And yes, it is entirely my own fault.
Having said that, going back to the pool and the gym and having the thin people give me "that look" at my fat thighs and my big belly makes the trip a lot more difficult. I'm punishing myself enough, snide comments and looks of contempt are overkill. I logged back on to this board tonight because I needed a little encouragement to push through it.
When I was in my 20's I was a size 4, and self-righteous about it!. Fat people, in my opinion, were lazy and contemptable. If they would just exercise and eat right, they wouldn't be so disgusting. Now,I'm in a size 12 and getting the payback I deserve.
If you have never been overweight, and I never was until my 40's, you really don't know what it is like on the other side.

IndyGal
November 18th, 2005, 11:01 AM
Hhmmnn. Well, speaking as someone with a history of eating disorders (at my low point I weighed about 80 lbs), I think it is horrible the pressure we put on others to be thin. I was a little chubby as a preteen, and I can still remember my grandmother saying, "I don't know why you're fat. You must have gotten that from the other side of the family; no one in our family has a weight problem." Now there's a constructive comment for a young girl, yes? When I see someone heavier at my pool, my thought is generally "good for you, more power to you!" I've seen some heavier folks who are terrific swimmers and some thin people who have terrible technique. I'm much more impressed by good swimmers, no matter their weight.

MichiganHusker
November 18th, 2005, 12:18 PM
Julie, I can totally relate to what you are saying. In college I thought anything over 110 lbs was fat. When I was hired as a Flight Attendant in 1986, we had weekly weigh in and I was 114 lbs.

At some point in the last 10 years - bam! (and I don't mean Emeril) - 80 extra pounds appeared and I have been struggling to get it off.

I started swimming to lose weight 1 month ago and I have done ALOT of research seeking encouragement, advice, tips, etc. In a nutshell, here is what I have learned so far - see also a thread I started - Swimming and Weight Loss.

1. Swimming is excellent exercise to lose weight because it uses alot of different muscles from head to toe. The key is to swim hard enough to get your heartrate up to at least 70-85% of your max heart rate.

2. The next thing is to make sure you get your heart rate up for at least 20-60 mins. For me personally, my metabolism is so out of whack for whatever reason, I don't see any results unless I work out at least 45 mins. for 5-6 times each week. I tried the 3x week thing, but nothing was happening.

3. You will not see immediate results. In fact it will take at least 12-20 weeks before you start seeing results. This is the real hard part because if you are like me, you want IMMEDIATE gratification. I have my calendar marked for 12 weeks from when I started swimming and I am doing other things to keep my motivation up. For example, I am noticing I just FEEL better after swimming. My patience level is up and overall happiness is really great and everyone around me can tell.

4. I bought a scale that was recommended by Dr. Phil (ok, I'm a sucker for celebrity endorsements). The scale allegedly tells me if I am losing fat or holding onto water. Women's weight fluxuates dramatically from day to day. I personally like to weigh myself daily to note the changes and then I analyze why the changes occur. For example, I noticed that I gain weight after working out hard and this is because when muscles are repairing, muscles will hold onto water. (Another reason why you don't see immediate results).

5. Swimming is one form of exercise that you need to watch your eating AFTER you work out. You will notice on your drive home from the pool that you are absolutely starving. You will need to drink alot of water between getting into the pool and getting home to cure any tendencies to clear out the cupboard after eating. Just knowing this helps. I have found that eating a power bar or PBJ sandwich about 1 hour before swimming helps too. Personally, I hate plain water, so I drink Crystal Light. They have those cool "to-go" pouches now that you just pour into bottled water.

6. You need to watch what you eat. I tend to eat healthy so that is why not losing weight is extremely frustrating for me. The main thing is portion control. Think of your stomach as a gas tank. You want to eat until your tank is full, not overflowing. The key here is to eat slowly and stop after one helping. If you are still hungry, eat more. But ask yourself, am I REALLY hungry? I personally have a hard time with eating too much because I love food! If something I eat tastes really good, I just want more and more. Some people are emotional eaters. My best friend overeats out of loneliness, for example. These are issues that you really need to be honest with yourself and try different things to resolve. I started crocheting in the evening and it is really hard to eat when both of your hands are busy AND I have made some really cool throws for my friends (great holiday gifts too).

7. Two great books that talk about weight loss and recap most of the above are Total Immersion and Fitness Swimming - Emmett Hines.

So, if you are wondering how I'm doing after 1 month. Something is starting to happen. First, I feel great and my confidence is back. I have not lost weight on the scale, but my Fat percentage shows I've lost 3 lbs. of Fat. That's all I really care about.

I also take my measurements since I don't care what the scale shows if I can fit into a size 6. I have lost anywhere from 1" to 1/2" from various body parts. Bust - lost 1", Arms - lost 1/2", etc.

This time I refuse to give up. I am going to keep swimming because it is a form of exercise I can do until I die. I plan to be the 100+ Age group national masters' champion. Perhaps you will be my main competition?!?

We should start a weight loss blog/thread of some sort. Good luck!!

dorothyrde
November 18th, 2005, 12:44 PM
Susan, very good tips.

Bags
November 18th, 2005, 02:11 PM
I know this is going to sound flippant, but the only way to reliably lose weight is to burn more calories than you consume.

Most people don't really understand the nutritional contents of what they eat.

My best advice is to get a calorie counting program of some sort (calorieking.com is a great site) and track what you eat obsessively.

If you pick a daily calorie intake level 500 calories per day below what you burn daily, you will lose a pound or two every week.

No guesswork there. It is just a fact.

For me it worked to calculate my BMR (you can find calculators online) at a "sedentary" rate and then add a couple of hundred calories to that. That became my daily intake ceiling.

Then i swam 6 days a week. The weight fell off.

Once you reach your desired weight you can gradually add calories.

The nice thing about this approach is that it takes the uncertainty out of the process. Hit your targets and keep swimming and it's a done deal.

gull
November 18th, 2005, 02:27 PM
The latest national guidelines confirm that an hour of daily exercise is necessary for weight loss. The argument that swimming won't help you lose weight doesn't hold water--the problem is that many people do not swim long enough or hard enough. I don't believe swimming at a recovery pace for 30 minutes will accomplish much.

dorothyrde
November 18th, 2005, 02:45 PM
Bags, it seems as easy as that, but believe me, for some people, it is not that simple. Especially women in their 40's and 50's. The body plays some pretty mean tricks on us at this age, and it gets harder and harder to maintain and not gain, much less lose. The weight does NOT just fall off.

Losing weigh IS mostly diet. Exercise is an added benefit that helps, but if the diet is not under control with reasonable portion sizes, and healthy foods, it is very difficult to lose.

MichiganHusker
November 18th, 2005, 04:12 PM
P.S. I just went to lunch with my team and 2 people said I look like I have lost weight!

knelson
November 18th, 2005, 04:22 PM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
Bags, it seems as easy as that, but believe me, for some people, it is not that simple.

I think it really is as simple as that. The only possible way to lose weight is for your body to "burn" more calories than you consume. If not than we've discovered a perpetual motion machine!!

The thing that is difficult is determining how many calories your body is actually burning and to eat less than that amount.

dorothyrde
November 18th, 2005, 05:28 PM
Yes, and for many people, finding that right amount is very difficult. I think a lot of people who have posted on this thread are people who really have not had a real weight problem. Yes, maybe they gained weight over the years, but they have been blessed with fairly good metabolisms, and when they cut back some, they lose.

I am married to a person like that. Eats whatever he wants, and does not gain. He eats much more than I, eats far worse foods than I, and is much less active than I. If I ate like him, and did not work out, I would easily be over 200 pounds.

It is hard for a person that is like that, to understand a person who is like me. It has been a constant battle since I was 12. I am winning that battle currently, but it is with constant diligence.

Now I am off to eat my low-fat healthy meal, and go swim my 90 minute Masters practice, just so I don't GAIN.

aquageek
November 18th, 2005, 06:08 PM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
but they have been blessed with fairly good metabolisms

...or, alternatively, they have been blessed with self control on the chip aisle.

dorothyrde
November 18th, 2005, 06:15 PM
See, that is what I am talking about. People assume someone who is heavier, must be eating a lot of crap. People would look at my thin husband, and me, and assume that he ate healthy, and exercised, and I did not. Well, it was completely the opposite. And I know many people who are like this. It does take self control, and diligence, but it is a lot harder for some people than others.


PS. I cannot stand chips! :)

Peter Cruise
November 18th, 2005, 07:07 PM
Dorothy- ingnore the Geek, he's just up to his usual pyrotechnics.

Fitswimmer04
November 18th, 2005, 07:27 PM
Learn from my sins Aquageek-I made comments like that for 30 years and now I'm paying for them.

As for everyone else, thanks for all the good advice. I agree that the bottom line is to burn more than I consume, which is why I'm getting back to exercise. I've lost an inch around my waist, hips and thighs since September, not as quick as I'd hoped, but at least it's something. I have done the Weight Watchers Point counting thing, and it does help force portion control. Also, when I have to write down everything I eat, I'm less likely to hit the office candy dish every time I walk by.
I'm not a person who blames the issue on genes, although I think it's clear that some people are genetically less predisposed to gain. My manager at work eats the worst stuff imaginable, donuts, cake, poptarts, candy-all day long, does not exercise and is thin as a rail. However, for most of us it's about personal choice. I chose the relationship with Lazy and Eat Whatever I Want and now I'm choosing the divorce.

aquageek
November 18th, 2005, 08:18 PM
Originally posted by Peter Cruise
Dorothy- ingnore the Geek, he's just up to his usual pyrotechnics.

Cruise is right - eat all the twinkies, chips and lard you want and blame it on metabolism.

I always find it amusing that when people lose weight they all agree it's diet and exercise that did it but when they are all tubby it's metabolism, society and McDonalds that makes them obese.

Peter Cruise
November 18th, 2005, 08:30 PM
Lard? I thought that lard was the official hair tonic of North Carolina....

dorothyrde
November 18th, 2005, 09:58 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
Cruise is right - eat all the twinkies, chips and lard you want and blame it on metabolism.

I always find it amusing that when people lose weight they all agree it's diet and exercise that did it but when they are all tubby it's metabolism, society and McDonalds that makes them obese.

Hmmm, since I eat none of those things, I guess I can blame it on metabolism. Geek, you know my point is, some people have a more difficult time maintaining optimal weight than others. And yes, some people don't even try, and then blame it on metabolism.

I know what I have to do to maintain my weight and not gain, and I do that. However, don't make light of the effort it takes and how difficult it is for people.

And it makes it worse when certain people in this world look down on them for being heavy. It takes a lot of courage to put on a swimsuit and swim laps when you are over weight. It is embarrassing. You think the whole world is looking down at you, is disgusted with you, and hey, apparently there is at least one person in Charlotte who is.

Bob McAdams
November 19th, 2005, 12:07 AM
Originally posted by Bags
I know this is going to sound flippant, but the only way to reliably lose weight is to burn more calories than you consume.

An equally reliable and much faster way to lose weight is to cut off an arm or leg. If this approach doesn't appeal to you, it's probably because what you really want to lose is not weight but fat.

The two are not synonymous! You will lose weight if you lose fat and everything else remains the same. But it is possible (though increasingly difficult as you get older) to put on lean body mass as you lose fat, and as a result to have your total weight remain the same. And it is also possible to lose weight but to have a significant amount of that weight loss be lean body mass rather than fat.

In fact, it has been estimated that if you lose weight through dieting and aren't doing heavy exercise when you do it, only about 75% of the weight you lose will be fat. And, to make matters worse, if you put weight back on and aren't doing heavy exercise, about 90% of the weight you put on will be fat.


Bob

Zirconium
November 19th, 2005, 12:29 AM
Here is an article to further support Bob's explanation:

The Zigzag Diet For Fast Fat Loss!
http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/drsquat6.htm

dvarner
November 19th, 2005, 06:54 PM
Wow.

There were times in the past when I felt like I lost weight during hard training when I actually ate more than normal.

Is there a summary for the Master's crowd that could be assimilated from this thread? Seems like age, family and professional issues complicate the reality as well.

In my own personal case, maybe as with others, I have odd workout times - before work (shower, rush to the office, stress, stress, stress) and late (8:30 - 9:30 at night). One requires eating on the run from the food court, the other requires eating before (but not too much and early enough...) but I wonder if I should eat other strategies rather than go to sleep exhausted and possibly undernourished or eat a cheap breakfast.

Would like to lose 20 lbs, swimming from 15,000 - 19,000 yds/wk over the last year and a half has not made one dent in my weight. But I am in better shape and swimming faster.

Opinions welcome, this thread is fascinating.

Thanks,

DV

aquageek
November 19th, 2005, 07:30 PM
Originally posted by bud
I have way more respect for those folks than for the ones who are out there and "don't seem to need it".

This is complete nonsense. Did you ever stop to think that the people who you claim "don't seem to need it" are the folks who have been out there for years on end maintaining a healthy weight while others were at home doing nothing about it? Why should the obese person get more credit than the devoted athlete?

Fitswimmer04
November 19th, 2005, 09:45 PM
Actually, I think everyone who makes the effort to exercise and eat right is definately bucking the societal trend and deserves equal admiration. It's so much easier to stay in bed in the morning than to get up and exercise, so much easier to eat processed food then to take the time to buy healthier foods and cook-anyone making efforts to achieve those goals should be proud of themselves and supported by others-no matter what they look like.

synergy
December 9th, 2005, 05:32 AM
Sorry. Nevermind.