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View Full Version : Ginger for Motion Sickness on mythbusters



Kevin in MD
December 16th, 2005, 08:51 PM
Last night on the show mythbusters they were working on motion sickness. They built a replica of the NASA motion sickness chair. You sit in it blindfolded and it rotates. As it spins you then tilt your head all the way forward, then all the way to one side, all the way to the other side, then all the way back. You repeat that *LITERALLY* ad nauseum.

They tested remedies.

There were two guys who would get seasick in the chair, these poor guys did it repeatedly to test the different "cures". One guy would get it in about 3 minutes, the other about 20.

Off they went,
Electric wrist bands - no change in time to seasickness

Some sort of spray - no change

Ginger - they both lasted 30 minutes at which point they stopped the tests and called it victory - this was the arbitrary standard they used in the beginning to see of others would get seasick.

Placebo - one guy no change, the less sensitive guy lasted 30 minutes.

Over the counter pills - they both lasted 30 minutes but there was a very entertaining interview afterward when both guys were obviously VERY loopy.

They did not mention if the pill was "original" dramamine or the new "less drowsy" dramamine. The newer one is a large improvement but still does make you drowsy.

I learned about ginger here, and thought you guys would like to know.

Alicat
December 17th, 2005, 10:33 AM
It took me a moment to realize it was the spice ginger rather than a women named Ginger! Too much clorine on the brain!:D

gemich
December 20th, 2005, 09:05 PM
Did they try the prescription drug Scopolamine [sic]? It's a patch that has worked for me on a number of longer distance open water relay swims where the swells have been a little much.

PoulsboH20
December 23rd, 2005, 02:51 PM
Originally posted by gemich
Did they try the prescription drug Scopolamine [sic]? It's a patch that has worked for me on a number of longer distance open water relay swims where the swells have been a little much.

I've never used scopolamine, but I'd like to know if you noted any of the side affects.

"Structurally similar to the nerve substance acetylcholine, scopolamine acts by interfering with the transmission of nerve impulses by acetylcholine in the parasympathetic nervous system and produces symptoms typical of parasympathetic system depression: dilated pupils, rapid heartbeat, and dry skin, mouth, and respiratory passages. Because scopolamine depresses the central nervous system, it is used as a sedative prior to anesthesia and as an antispasmodic in certain disorders characterized by restlessness and agitation, e.g., delirium tremens, psychosis, mania, and Parkinsonism."

Maybe I'll try the ginger...

MegSmath
December 24th, 2005, 03:49 PM
My husband used the scopalamine patch on a cruise to Alaska this summer. He's very susceptible to motion sickness, and was definitely green before he gave in and used the patch. It was a vacation saver for him. He did note dry mouth, but had no other side effects.

Kevin in MD
December 25th, 2005, 05:02 PM
Originally posted by gemich
Did they try the prescription drug Scopolamine [sic]? It's a patch that has worked for me on a number of longer distance open water relay swims where the swells have been a little much.

They only used over the counter remedies.

Last year for the tampa bay marathon, my head crewman was an ER doc (he still is) and offered to bring scopolamine. I told him I wouldn't take it if he brought it. The thinking being that I would only take what is available to every swimmer.

Keep in mind that the tampa bay marathon swim is a race, not a solo crossing.

There are many issues here that come into play. Is it really fair play to use prescription drugs during an event? Can a swimmer take prescriptin anti inflammatories to get through the 200 yd free at nationals? Should they?

In this case motion sickness is definitely part of the challenge of open water racing. I am not sure it is exactly sporting to take prescription medicine to keep it away.

Somehow in my mind it would pertain mostly to open water races, on a solo crossing it would bother me less.

I don't know that that makes much sense, but I think it deserves consideration by the participants.

With open water racing added to the olympics, there is an outside chance that the wada could address it but probably not. In any case the fina races are usually contested on loop courses in rather flat water. And 10k for the olympic level wouldn't take that long anyway.