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View Full Version : Speedsuits: fact, fiction, fantasy? Anybody else confused?



SCAQ Member
December 23rd, 2005, 03:13 AM
I am looking at TYR's Aquablade with the "tripwires" that create drag to remove different kinds of drags. Fastskin II's which strategically place dimples to redirect eddies and flow, Arena's Powerskin with the light and slippery, water-resistant, superhero fabric and one or two other brands.

The statistics stating that the most gold medal winners wore Speedo fastskins doesn't hold water. (get it? Pun intended.) If Speedo paid Phelps 100 million dollars to wear a dead cow around his neck and swim, he would have. And if they paid him 100 million more he would have won too.

USMS has an article saying speedsuits are primarily psychological.

Are any of you satisfied with your speedsuits? Have you tried several brands? What's your take?

Right now I have been very happy with TYR's quality over that off Speedo. I am wearing a TYR fusion and it feels fast and is extremely durable. now wear TYR suits but Speedo gogles

Dolphin 2
December 23rd, 2005, 02:53 PM
While some promote these high tech suits as a performance-enhancing breakthrough, many others (and myself) view them as just an attempt to add technological gimmickry to the swimming art. They are merely a commercial product that can be simply bought for a price (and they are pretty expensive too) any advantage (such as increased speed) they might provide is artificial and does not reflect the true ability of each individual swimmer.

Interestingly, the definition (from my Webster's Dictionary) of an athlete is "A person possessing naturally acquired traits, such as the physique, strength, agility, and endurance, which are required for competitive sports." A swimmer is probably the most eloquent example of the definition of a true athlete.

Technological improvements are OK for mechanized sports like NASCAR and the Indy 500. However, the true art of swimming should be left to reflect the mind and body of the individual athlete regardless of which commercial product they use.

The bottom line (no pun intended) let's keep the traditional Racer briefs as "standard equipment". They are the most comfortable to wear in the water too.

Happy Holidays

gull
December 23rd, 2005, 03:06 PM
Originally posted by Dolphin 2
The bottom line (no pun intended) let's keep the traditional Racer briefs as "standard equipment". They are the most comfortable to wear in the water too.

Judging from this photo of Geek at the Charlotte meet last year, I'd say he agrees:

aquageek
December 23rd, 2005, 04:01 PM
I've had it with you, Pigeon Boy. For this latest outburst you shall pay dearly. For instance, let's put your new $400 swim suit up as a bet.

gull
December 23rd, 2005, 04:12 PM
Originally posted by aquageek
I've had it with you, Pigeon Boy. For this latest outburst you shall pay dearly. For instance, let's put your new $400 swim suit up as a bet.


It's really not your color. Besides, it's a competition suit. Which you are not.

Did I mention that the beard looks good on you?

dorothyrde
December 23rd, 2005, 04:31 PM
aaaaaaghhhhh not that picture again.

SCAQ Member
December 23rd, 2005, 05:47 PM
That guy rules! You know how much courage or lack of self awareness it took to wear a red speedo in public like that? Nonetheless, please stay on topic, are any of you satisfied with your suits, have you tried any other brands, what has been your experienced?

gull
December 23rd, 2005, 06:18 PM
I have an FSII bodyskin (sleeveless)--I think it's great. Much better than the FSI legskins. Haven't tried any other brands.

By the way, Geek has no self awareness.

aquageek
December 23rd, 2005, 08:43 PM
Being a man who chooses not to flash my money so publically, I just compete in your average pair of jammers or a brief at a meet. I will say I buy a new one for meets every few months so they are a little tighter, not as tight as the FSII aka "the poseur's choice."

breastroker
December 23rd, 2005, 09:14 PM
I remember very clearly at the US Olympic trials the best swimmers got the latest and best swimming gear.

The TYR was fast, but tore easily.

Since these are not free to us, I would go with the Speedo Fastskin II's. My Fastskin has lasted two years of competition with zero wear yet. :D

As to your question, there have been several other studies showing these suits are faster than the older competition lycra suits. I know several older gentlemen, like Frank Pieme, who swears by the full body suits. No way arround it, he is old and his skin is loose. The suit keeps it all tight!

Tom Ellison
December 23rd, 2005, 09:20 PM
In order to compete in a field of swimmers using Speedo 2000 racing suites a few years ago I purchased one. I discovered that it dropped 15 to 30 seconds off my 1650/1500 meter times. I did not want to shell out the dollars to buy this suit, but I wanted to remain as competitive as everyone else in my field. Trust me, they work, they reduce times and if you want to run with the big dogs…..you are going to have to step up to the plate and buy one.

Now to the question that still lingers…..Should these type racing suits be allowed? My vote is no…..it detracts from the purity of the sport and event. Keep it simple…..make a rule where all suits are made of the same fiber and fabric….then it amounts to who is the fastest and in the best shape….not who wore a factory think tank suit that was smoother then shaved skin….

I will say it one more time….I believe they reduce drag and make your times faster…..and unless you have that edge….you are giving up time.

Merry Christmas to all my friends here at USMS……

God Bless….

Tom Ellison

PS: Geek......you should wear that suit out on the Left Bank in meets....:) Hey Man....you had it going on there....:)

valhallan
December 24th, 2005, 09:03 AM
Originally posted by dorothyrde
aaaaaaghhhhh not that picture again.

It appears that anyone unfortunate enough to have had their corneas burned by this visage....would undoubtedly swim much much faster than usual to get away. Ergo...this would be classified as a "speed suit".


...and craig....please stop posting that thing.

gull
December 24th, 2005, 12:32 PM
Originally posted by valhallan
...and craig....please stop posting that thing.

I will not stop until the racing brief advocates stop.


Originally posted by aquageek
Being a man who chooses not to flash my money so publically [sic], I just compete in your average pair of jammers or a brief at a meet. I will say I buy a new one for meets every few months so they are a little tighter, not as tight as the FSII aka "the poseur's choice."

The way I look at it, my golfing friends pour thousands of dollars into a "sport" they play only on weekends. Since many of us train five or six days/week, year after year, a $300 FSII is not that extravagant.

Besides, this gives you an excuse when I kick your butt.

Peter Cruise
December 24th, 2005, 01:11 PM
Craig...close your eyes and imagine the same guy in a full body suit...

valhallan
December 24th, 2005, 03:37 PM
Originally posted by gull80
I will not stop until the racing brief advocates stop.



Then this one is just for you my friend. Fastskins are not just for fast swimming as Peter pointed out.

Tom Ellison
December 24th, 2005, 07:37 PM
Their aint enough Tequila.....Trust me!

A.K.
December 24th, 2005, 11:51 PM
Bring me a Bucket !

mattson
December 25th, 2005, 10:41 AM
Originally posted by breastroker
As to your question, there have been several other studies showing these suits are faster than the older competition lycra suits. I know several older gentlemen, like Frank Pieme, who swears by the full body suits. No way arround it, he is old and his skin is loose. The suit keeps it all tight!

I was thinking that these suits might help the typical Masters swimmer more than the elite (<10% body fat) athletes. I notice that when I am rolling well in freestyle, my hip stops, but my spare tire keeps rotating. :( A body suit helps everything move or stop at the same time, so less wasted energy.

PoulsboH20
December 25th, 2005, 11:48 PM
Assuming that these suits are as good as advertised, are they directed more at any particular races? I only seem to hear testimonials from those in the distance lanes.
By the way, thanks for the pictures. I feeling downright svelt in comparision!:D

Suit Chaser
December 26th, 2005, 01:27 PM
I think what needs the most explanation is gull80's "bear" fetish...

Jeff Commings
December 27th, 2005, 12:22 PM
Originally posted by Tom Ellison
In order to compete in a field of swimmers using Speedo 2000 racing suites a few years ago I purchased one. I discovered that it dropped 15 to 30 seconds off my 1650/1500 meter times. I did not want to shell out the dollars to buy this suit, but I wanted to remain as competitive as everyone else in my field. Trust me, they work, they reduce times and if you want to run with the big dogs…..you are going to have to step up to the plate and buy one.

I have swum with my Aquablade brief since the dawn of time (well, since 2002). I've used against "big dogs" and "little dogs." I've won more races against them than I've lost. I think for most (I empahasize MOST) masters swimmers the use of full bodysuits substitutes for weight and flexibility training, as well as extra pool training.

When I'm getting ready for a race, I don't judge my competition by the suit they are wearing. It's idiotic. The suit you wear has about 5 percent to do with the outcome of a race. Sixty percent of it is mental. The rest is from training and pool conditions.

And Tom, it's wrong to praise your Speedo 2000 for your amazing drop in time. Did you train harder? Did you lift weights? Did you tone your body? I believe you would have had an amazing drop with a different suit.


I will say it one more time….I believe they reduce drag and make your times faster…..and unless you have that edge….you are giving up time.


I will say it one more time. I have no problem with body suits. Just don't sit on your butt for six months thinking you don't need to train because of that $200 suit in your closet. If you don't train, it won't help at all.

gull
December 27th, 2005, 12:47 PM
Originally posted by Jeff Commings
I think for most (I empahasize MOST) masters swimmers the use of full bodysuits substitutes for weight and flexibility training, as well as extra pool training.

I would say "some" or even "many," but "most" seems a bit harsh. Look, don't assume that if a Masters swimmer shows up wearing a bodysuit he (or she) has not put in the work and is not "worthy" of the suit. Consider what the average weekend warrior spends on running shoes, tennis rackets, golf clubs, etc. There shouldn't be a bias against those of us who choose to wear these suits.

Swimmer Bill
December 27th, 2005, 12:54 PM
Originally posted by Jeff Commings
don't sit on your butt for six months thinking you don't need to train because of that $200 suit in your closet. If you don't train, it won't help at all.

LOL!

When I sit on my butt for six months, my suit doesn't fit anymore!

:)

craiglll@yahoo.com
December 27th, 2005, 12:59 PM
The way I look at it, my golfing friends pour thousands of dollars into a "sport" they play only on weekends. Since many of us train five or six days/week, year after year, a $300 FSII is not that extravagant.

Besides, this gives you an excuse when I kick your butt. [/B][/QUOTE]

Craig,

My friend's sons told me that they had purchased a pair of pants for me. Instead, it was a speedo brief and a framed picture of this guy. I don't know where they got the picture. I kept asking ifthe pants were golfing pants so that I woudl have something unique to wear when we went golfing this summer ( both have just now gotten into golfing). I told them that I wanteda pair of lime green and yellow plaid pants like many used to have in the 70s.

Jeff Commings
December 27th, 2005, 03:45 PM
I have no bias against people who wear them. My fiance wears them. Some of my best friends in swimming wear them. And they are great technology.

I have personally heard people -- fewer than a lot, more than a few -- say that they bought the suits because it would make up for the training they hadn't done.

I just have an issue with people who wear the suits thinking they are automatically going to win races. And I have heard from those people as well.

gull
December 27th, 2005, 04:07 PM
A golfer told me today he'd bought a $400 driver for Christmas. He said, "You can't buy a swing, so buy a driver."

I noticed a difference with the bodyskin. Was it really better training and a taper? Was it psychological? Or did the suit affect resistance and buoyancy that much? I think it was a combination. I will say that two years ago my legskins did not compensate for my lack of training at that time.

Tom Ellison
December 29th, 2005, 09:21 PM
Jeff:
When I wore my Speedo 2000 it was in the middle of my being in the best Masters condition I was ever in.....I worked hard both in the pool along with some dry land work and honestly found that suit reduced my times. When I was in shape and working out (not bragging) there were few people who worked harder.....I had very, very good coaching and top of the line swimmers to work out with every morning....and when the coach told me to leave it all in the pool during practice....that is what I did.

Heck, I have nothing to gain by saying that suit made my times drop...except to share what I believe happened....

Peter Cruise
December 30th, 2005, 03:39 PM
Tom- did you wear the full-full body type that covers antlers?

valhallan
December 30th, 2005, 05:46 PM
...The Moose probably sheds his antlers during the taper season.

On another note...this was an interesting link regarding the pros and cons of various suits and manufacturers.

http://www-rohan.sdsu.edu/dept/coachsci/swimming/bodysuit/table.htm

Tom Ellison
December 30th, 2005, 08:28 PM
The Speedo 2000 suit was not full body, it was just like a standard woman Speedo with no legs.

I wasn't Mr. Moose back then ....and.... it took me another year or two to find Ralph in here....;) Gosh, I never thought about my rack and now I'm wondering what I am going to do when I start getting in shape after the first of the year....Oh well, I shed them from winter until summer so I have a few months to figure it out....

Maybe I can get that fox in the Red suit at the bottom of page two to trim my horns come summer time....:cool:

Peter Cruise
December 31st, 2005, 01:36 AM
Tom, Tom,Tom,Tom...I am speechless,

Peter Cruise
December 31st, 2005, 01:38 AM
No wonder so many moose get creamed by freight trains during the wintertime...

breastroker
January 1st, 2006, 04:17 PM
Brent is a friend and is 100% correct on this:

The Speedo Fastskin is very helpful when it is dry. When it becomes wet, which could take as much as 3-5 minutes in a race, it is slower than an "old" Aquablade. The Fastskin is not a suit for distance (more than 200 m) swimmers.

I have used the Speedo Fastskin for many years, even when not in the best of shape it cuts about half a second on my 50 breast. I was one of the first Masters to use the Speedo 2000. I use the kneeskin, which is what breaststrokers use. And yes, the suit does not make up for my lack of training.

Jeff should try one:D

Jeff Commings
January 3rd, 2006, 11:37 AM
I have.

A.K.
January 3rd, 2006, 09:48 PM
Originally posted by breastroker


I have used the Speedo Fastskin for many years, even when not in the best of shape it cuts about half a second on my 50 breast. I was one of the first Masters to use the Speedo 2000. I use the kneeskin, which is what breaststrokers use. And yes, the suit does not make up for my lack of training.
Jeff should try one:D

I swim Breaststroke too

I was looking to get either the Aquablade of Fastskin I or II, however in a jammer instead of kneeskin. ?s

What do you see are the major differences?

Is the Aquablade impacted much if swum with while wet?

How would you dry a FS suit and how long does it take?

breastroker
January 3rd, 2006, 10:02 PM
I have used both the Fastskin I Jammer and the kneeskin. The kneeskin is faster! The best thing about the kneeskin is there is still good shoulder flexibility.

You don't have to worry about these suits drying off, they dry so fast they feel like a cooler. They wick away the water and evaporate so fast you have to worry about getting chilled.

A.K.
January 4th, 2006, 11:31 PM
Do you just leave the suit on for the whole meet or should it be taken off between events?

The Fortress
October 31st, 2006, 12:34 PM
This is a very funny thread. Geek, I never knew.... On another thread, Paul Smith said the average Fastskin II bodysuit only lasts, i.e., retains its water repellancy, for 3-4 meets or 10-12 swims. For $300, that seems like kind of a lot. Plus, I know swimmers who've had their bodyskins for years. Do they really only last such a short time? Personally, I think they make a difference, but not a huge difference. No substitute whatsoever for hard work.

AK: Don't use it in warm up. Put it on after. Taking it off and on during a meet ? Forget it, too much work involved with that.

born2fly
November 2nd, 2006, 01:20 PM
I love my speedo fastskin. I remember 2 meets I did two weekends in a row two years ago. The first meet, I did not wear the fast skin and the following weekend I did. The difference in time was big drop for me, and no, I was not rested the second meet. I have gone thru a lot of fast skins but I do save one that is worn. I will use this at times when I am tapering and get used to the feel of it.

without fast skin in first meet.
100 fly 56 then 54 with fastskin
200 fly 2:04 to 2:00
100 free 51 to 49
200 free 1:54 1:49

I basically only sport the fast skin at the big meets that I shave and taper for but sometimes I will wear one in a regular meet.

greg