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rrmjr
December 28th, 2005, 12:00 AM
Some years back I finished a novel about swimming—specifically, about three swimming brothers growing up on the age-group circuit in suburban Pittsburgh of the 60s; actually, kind of a combination swimming / coming-of-age novel. I sent the ms. around to a handful of agents and publishers and got a nibble or two, but shelved it when I felt I had exhausted my legitimate contacts. My lack of persistence was a problem, but another might have been timing: one agent responded that swimming wasn’t the hot sport at the moment; golf (i. e. Tiger Woods) was. I’m hoping that the subject of swimming might be more of a selling point in the wake of Michael Phelps. Without making any claims for the quality of the novel (though ordinarily I’m happy to write my own blurbs), I thought I might enlist the help of my fellow swimmers as I prepare to submit it to the publishing world again. Best case would be to come across an agent or publisher who was also an avid swimmer. But short of that I was wondering if any master swimmer might have any contacts in the publishing world, even a tenuous one, that he or she could put me on to. Sometimes that’s what it takes. Please feel free to write me back with suggestions or questions about the novel.

Anthony Thompson
December 28th, 2005, 10:19 AM
Why not send a note to Phil Whitten at Sport Publication International (who publish Swimmer, Swimming World, Swimming Technique... magazines) ? Phil is a recent inductee into the Swimming Hall of Fall and an avid supportor of masters swimming.

Contact information is on thier website swiminfo.com

They might event be interested in publishing the book ?

Anthony Thompson

ande
December 28th, 2005, 11:09 AM
take the plunge

into self publishing

there's print on demand companies like
www.Xlibris.com
www.Iuniverse.com
www.lulu.com

here's an NPR report:
Taking the Plunge into Book Self-Publishing
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4699387

find out how your book competes in the market
why wait to get an agent then for the agent to place the book.
just get it to market
If it sells, publishers will come to you

Ande

MichiganHusker
December 28th, 2005, 12:05 PM
Did you ever teach at Lincoln East High School in Lincoln Nebraska?

ande
September 23rd, 2006, 08:25 PM
How are things going?
Do you have any updates to report?

ande


Originally posted by rrmjr
Some years back I finished a novel about swimming—specifically, about three swimming brothers growing up on the age-group circuit in suburban Pittsburgh of the 60s; actually, kind of a combination swimming / coming-of-age novel. I sent the ms. around to a handful of agents and publishers and got a nibble or two, but shelved it when I felt I had exhausted my legitimate contacts. My lack of persistence was a problem, but another might have been timing: one agent responded that swimming wasn’t the hot sport at the moment; golf (i. e. Tiger Woods) was. I’m hoping that the subject of swimming might be more of a selling point in the wake of Michael Phelps. Without making any claims for the quality of the novel (though ordinarily I’m happy to write my own blurbs), I thought I might enlist the help of my fellow swimmers as I prepare to submit it to the publishing world again. Best case would be to come across an agent or publisher who was also an avid swimmer. But short of that I was wondering if any master swimmer might have any contacts in the publishing world, even a tenuous one, that he or she could put me on to. Sometimes that’s what it takes. Please feel free to write me back with suggestions or questions about the novel.

FindingMyInnerFish
September 23rd, 2006, 11:04 PM
That novel sounds interesting! I hope you publish it!

You might want to look into Breakaway Books. They publish a lot of sports related books. While they started with mainly running books, they have branched into other sports. Here's a link with their guidelines for submission:

http://www.breakawaybooks.com/submissions/submissions.html

Hope this proves helpful!

KaizenSwimmer
September 24th, 2006, 07:29 AM
Originally posted by Anthony Thompson
Why not send a note to Phil Whitten

Phil is no longer with SPI. He is now executive director of CSCAA - the college coaches' organization.

lindsay
September 26th, 2006, 05:22 AM
I am the one who often suffers from elbow injury but never experienced shoulder problems. My elbow is more prone to injury because I used to play tennis when I was a teenager and my rocket was much too heavy.

By the way, I already started to wander if there is something severely wrong with my technique. My logic was the following: if shoulder injuries are popular among swimmers, I should have the same problems, because I expose the same joints to the risk. Then, if my problems are different, it means that I use more briskly different joints than the najority of good (technically correct) swimmers do. So it follows, that my technique must be seriously faulty.

KaizenSwimmer
September 26th, 2006, 06:50 AM
So it follows, that my technique must be seriously faulty.

That's a reasonable supposition. Shoulder injury has far less to do with volume than with volume-practice of biomechanically unsound movements.

The specific movement/position most responsible for shoulder injury in swimming is the long reach entry in freestyle, followed by quick catch. That position or technique puts great pressure on a long lever (fully extended arm) at a time when the shoulder is highly unstable.

If you read the article by Jonty Skinner on the USA Swimming website which I referenced in my initial post on the thread "the effect of scy training on technique" you can learn more about a sounder, safer technique - earlier, steeper entry, with arm in a more vertical position, and flexed at the elbow, before applying pressure to hand/forearm.

lindsay
September 26th, 2006, 07:59 AM
That's a reasonable supposition. Shoulder injury has far less to do with volume than with volume-practice of biomechanically unsound movements.

The specific movement/position most responsible for shoulder injury in swimming is the long reach entry in freestyle, followed by quick catch. That position or technique puts great pressure on a long lever (fully extended arm) at a time when the shoulder is highly unstable.

If you read the article by Jonty Skinner on the USA Swimming website which I referenced in my initial post on the thread "the effect of scy training on technique" you can learn more about a sounder, safer technique - earlier, steeper entry, with arm in a more vertical position, and flexed at the elbow, before applying pressure to hand/forearm.

I have a feeling that you missed my idea. My supposition was that my technique must be faulty not because I suffer from shoulder injury but rather because I do not experience anything like that but, instead, I happen to have some very untypical problems for swimmers. I was reasoning that if my injuries are untypical, it is probably because I use different joints than normally swimmers do. And this led me to the conclusion, that my technique must somehow diverge from what is accepted as correct.

Sorry if I did not get your point. I am Polish, English is my second language. But I inferred from your message that you think I complain of shoulder injury. And it is just the opposite.