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Beards247
September 23rd, 2002, 03:57 PM
I have experienced a few meets that I am absolutely crushed after I swim. In my first meet back after a 8yr "break" I swam a 100 Fr and was toast for the rest of the meet.

Since that point 2 years ago, This seems to only happen in 200's or the 400 IM. Symptoms are totally drained, overheating, even light headed, for 20-40 minutes after I swim. Basically I am incapable of doing anything for this time span.

I would assume it has to do with a level of fitness. But my question is how can I introduce training that will help me minimize this effect? FYI, I swim more or less 3-5x/wk, about 1- 1.5 miles over the course of an hour... I am 5'11" and a portly 230...

Chris

Phil M.
September 23rd, 2002, 08:06 PM
It sounds like severe lactic acid buildup to me. I think that there is training which you can do to build up your body's ability to clear the acid out more efficiently but I'll leave advice to the experts. My suggestion is to enter shorter races and leave at least an hour between events. That way you can push it as hard as you like and live to survive the next race. (that is what I do!) ** Given your height and weight you might want to consult a physician as well...

Lexa
September 23rd, 2002, 08:19 PM
Yes, sounds like lactic acid build up. I wonder about your workouts: do you swim continuously? Or always train at the same speed? Try doing interval training, and make some of your repeats faster/slower than the others. It sounds like your body needs practice in recovering from a high heart rate.

One drill I find helpful to get used to "changing gears" is to swim 100s like this: 25 focus on technique, 25 drill, 25 sprint , 25 recover.

Good luck!

Ion Beza
September 23rd, 2002, 08:50 PM
Originally posted by Beards247

...
Symptoms are totally drained, overheating, even light headed, for 20-40 minutes after I swim. Basically I am incapable of doing anything for this time span.

I would assume it has to do with a level of fitness. But my question is how can I introduce training that will help me minimize this effect?
...
Chris
I wonder Chris:
are you related to Craig Beardsley who had been the world record holder in 200 meter butterfly in 1983, finished third in the 1984 US Olympic Trials, and has a competitive brother?

I ask this for curiosity.

If the answer is yes, then you must have a heavy elite swimming background.

To address your question, I don't have much to say, because I am also assuming that it is due to a current level of fitness.

Myself, I am battling a different fight for being sharp in competitions:
sometimes I am a flat zombie during a race, I cannot bring myself up, and in these instances I would like a second go at the same race, right there on the spot.

Fisch
September 23rd, 2002, 10:24 PM
Hey Chris,
I'll repeat my posting mantra--

"Ya gotta swim fast to swim fast."

Do you practice sprints in your workouts? If you don't,
how do you expect your body to react in competition?

I think you need to practice race pace stuff at least a
couple of times a week. Mel Goldstine has posted some
"middle aged mortal" workouts that sound good.

I'm 49. My body tells me not to race more than one
200 yd+ race per meet, otherwise---toast.

Twice a week, prior to competition, I'll
try to do broken sets with decreasing intervals of the
race pace totalling three times the yardage of the race.

Say your goal is 2:10 for a 200 yd free---

try holding 50's at 30-31 sec x 4 at 60 sec intervals one week.

Do this three times. Rest whatever you need between sets
to complete each set.

Next week, ratchect down to :55, then :50, etc. Do this
three times the race distance or, in this case, 600 yards of race pace.

I swim 3000- 4000 yards /day 4xs/week.

Swim fast to swim fast.;)

Phil Arcuni
September 24th, 2002, 12:55 AM
Try a really long warm down after your race. I warm down until all of that lethargy, pain, whatever is gone. It takes a long time, but not nearly as long to recover as when I don't do the warmdown. It doesn't have to be very intense. After some races, such as a 200 fly, I can't do much more than a slow double arm backstroke. That's OK.

Beards247
September 24th, 2002, 09:58 AM
Thanks to all of you who e-mailed pubicly and privately. I will try to cover each of you in this response:

Phil M. - What struck me most was your suggestion to go see a physician. While I am overwieght, it is an eye opener to think of it in those terms. I think I will take you up on that suggestion.

Lexa - Lactic Acid is one of the causes. But I think the biggest cause is one I have skirted around for years, but not wanted to address - wieght.

Ion - Craig Beardsley and I are not closely related, though we are pretty sure we hang from the same tree. I have not spoken with him in years though.

Fisch - Any chance you swam @ SUNY Geneseo in NY? I remember a person with the last name of Fisch is why I ask... You are right though - You have to swim fast to swim fast.

But thank you to each of you for helping me put into perspective what my season goals need to focus on - I think it is safe to say it will not be best times.

MetroSwim
September 24th, 2002, 10:03 AM
Chris - I swam for SUNY Geneseo under Coach Hinkley for a couple of half-hearted seasons (83-84, 84-85).

When were you there?

Rich Barkan